References of "Hennuy, Benoît"
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See detailDelayed neuroendocrine sexual maturation in female rats after a very low dose of Bisphenol A through altered GABAergic neurotransmission and opposing effects of a high dose.
Franssen, Delphine ULg; GERARD, Arlette ULg; HENNUY, Benoit ULg et al

in Endocrinology (2016)

Rat sexual maturation is preceded by a reduction of the interpulse interval (IPI) of gonadotropinreleasing hormone (GnRH) neurosecretion. This work aims at studying disruption of that neuroendocrine event ... [more ▼]

Rat sexual maturation is preceded by a reduction of the interpulse interval (IPI) of gonadotropinreleasing hormone (GnRH) neurosecretion. This work aims at studying disruption of that neuroendocrine event in females after early exposure to a very low dose of Bisphenol A (BPA), a ubiquitous endocrine disrupting chemical. Female rats were exposed to vehicle or BPA 25 ng/kg.day, 25 g/kg.day, or 5 mg/kg.day from postnatal day (PND) 1 to 5 or 15. Exposure to 25 ng/kg.day of BPA for 5 or 15 days was followed by a delay in developmental reduction of GnRH IPI studied ex vivo on PND 20. After 15 days of exposure to that low dose of BPA, vaginal opening tended to be delayed. In contrast, exposure to BPA 5 mg/kg.day for 15 days resulted in a premature reduction inGnRHIPI and a trend toward early vaginal opening. RNAseq analysis on PND20 indicated that exposure to BPA resulted in opposing dose effectsonthemRNAexpression of hypothalamic genes involved inGABAA neurotransmission. The study of GnRH secretion in vitro in the presence of GABAA receptor agonist/antagonist confirmed an increased or a reduced GABAergic tone after in vivo exposure to the very low or the high dose of BPA, respectively. Overall, we show for the first time that neonatal exposure to BPA leads to opposing dose-dependent effects on the neuroendocrine control of puberty in the female rat. A very low and environmentally relevant dose of BPA delays neuroendocrine maturation related to puberty through increased inhibitory GABAergic neurotransmission. [less ▲]

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See detailA Membrane-Type-1 Matrix Metalloproteinase (MT1-MMP) - Discoidin Domain Receptor 1 Axis Regulates Collagen-Induced Apoptosis in Breast Cancer Cells.
Assent, Delphine; Bourgot, Isabelle ULg; Hennuy, Benoît ULg et al

in PloS one (2015), 10(3), 0116006

During tumour dissemination, invading breast carcinoma cells become confronted with a reactive stroma, a type I collagen-rich environment endowed with anti-proliferative and pro-apoptotic properties. To ... [more ▼]

During tumour dissemination, invading breast carcinoma cells become confronted with a reactive stroma, a type I collagen-rich environment endowed with anti-proliferative and pro-apoptotic properties. To develop metastatic capabilities, tumour cells must acquire the capacity to cope with this novel microenvironment. How cells interact with and respond to their microenvironment during cancer dissemination remains poorly understood. To address the impact of type I collagen on the fate of tumour cells, human breast carcinoma MCF-7 cells were cultured within three-dimensional type I collagen gels (3D COL1). Using this experimental model, we have previously demonstrated that membrane type-1 matrix metalloproteinase (MT1-MMP), a proteinase overexpressed in many aggressive tumours, promotes tumour progression by circumventing the collagen-induced up-regulation of BIK, a pro-apoptotic tumour suppressor, and hence apoptosis. Here we performed a transcriptomic analysis to decipher the molecular mechanisms regulating 3D COL1-induced apoptosis in human breast cancer cells. Control and MT1-MMP expressing MCF-7 cells were cultured on two-dimensional plastic plates or within 3D COL1 and a global transcriptional time-course analysis was performed. Shifting the cells from plastic plates to 3D COL1 activated a complex reprogramming of genes implicated in various biological processes. Bioinformatic analysis revealed a 3D COL1-mediated alteration of key cellular functions including apoptosis, cell proliferation, RNA processing and cytoskeleton remodelling. By using a panel of pharmacological inhibitors, we identified discoidin domain receptor 1 (DDR1), a receptor tyrosine kinase specifically activated by collagen, as the initiator of 3D COL1-induced apoptosis. Our data support the concept that MT1-MMP contributes to the inactivation of the DDR1-BIK signalling axis through the cleavage of collagen fibres and/or the alteration of DDR1 receptor signalling unit, without triggering a drastic remodelling of the transcriptome of MCF-7 cells. [less ▲]

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See detailNF-kappaB-induced KIAA1199 promotes survival through EGFR signalling.
Shostak, Kateryna ULg; Zhang, Xin; Hubert, Pascale ULg et al

in Nature communications (2014), 5

Constitutive activation of EGFR- and NF-kappaB-dependent pathways is a hallmark of cancer, yet signalling proteins that connect both oncogenic cascades are poorly characterized. Here we define KIAA1199 as ... [more ▼]

Constitutive activation of EGFR- and NF-kappaB-dependent pathways is a hallmark of cancer, yet signalling proteins that connect both oncogenic cascades are poorly characterized. Here we define KIAA1199 as a BCL-3- and p65-dependent gene in transformed keratinocytes. KIAA1199 expression is enhanced on human papillomavirus (HPV) infection and is aberrantly expressed in clinical cases of cervical (pre)neoplastic lesions. Mechanistically, KIAA1199 binds Plexin A2 and protects from Semaphorin 3A-mediated cell death by promoting EGFR stability and signalling. Moreover, KIAA1199 is an EGFR-binding protein and KIAA1199 deficiency impairs EGF-dependent Src, MEK1 and ERK1/2 phosphorylations. Therefore, EGFR stability and signalling to downstream kinases requires KIAA1199. As such, KIAA1199 promotes EGF-mediated epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT). Taken together, our data define KIAA1199 as an oncogenic protein induced by HPV infection and constitutive NF-kappaB activity that transmits pro-survival and invasive signals through EGFR signalling. [less ▲]

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See detailIn Vivo Tumorigenesis Was Observed after Injection of In Vitro Expanded Neural Crest Stem Cells Isolated from Adult Bone Marrow
Wislet, Sabine ULg; Poulet, Christophe ULg; Neirinckx, Virginie ULg et al

in PLoS ONE (2012), 7(10), 46425

Bone marrow stromal cells are adult multipotent cells that represent an attractive tool in cellular therapy strategies. Several studies have reported that in vitro passaging of mesenchymal stem cells ... [more ▼]

Bone marrow stromal cells are adult multipotent cells that represent an attractive tool in cellular therapy strategies. Several studies have reported that in vitro passaging of mesenchymal stem cells alters the functional and biological properties of those cells, leading to the accumulation of genetic aberrations. Recent studies described bone marrow stromal cells (BMSC) as mixed populations of cells including mesenchymal (MSC) and neural crest stem cells (NCSC). Here, we report the transformation of NCSC into tumorigenic cells, after in vitro long-term passaging. Indeed, the characterization of 6 neural crest-derived clones revealed the presence of one tumorigenic clone. Transcriptomic analyses of this clone highlighted, among others, numerous cell cycle checkpoint modifications and chromosome 11q down-regulation (suggesting a deletion of chromosome 11q) compared with the other clones. Moreover, unsupervised analysis such as a dendrogram generated after agglomerative hierarchical clustering comparing several transcriptomic data showed important similarities between the tumorigenic neural crest-derived clone and mammary tumor cell lines. Altogether, it appeared that NCSC isolated from adult bone marrow represents a potential danger for cellular therapy, and consequently, we recommend that phenotypic, functional and genetic assays should be performed on bone marrow mesenchymal and neural crest stem cells before in vivo use, to demonstrate whether their biological properties, after ex vivo expansion, remain suitable for clinical application. [less ▲]

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See detailMesenchymal stem cells and neural crest stem cells from adult bone marrow: characterization of their surprising similarities and differences.
Wislet, Sabine ULg; Laudet, Emerence ULg; Neirinckx, Virginie ULg et al

in Cellular and Molecular Life Sciences : CMLS (2012), 69(15), 2593-2608

The generation of neuronal cells from stem cells obtained from adult bone marrow is of significant clinical interest in order to design new cell therapy protocols for several neurological disorders. The ... [more ▼]

The generation of neuronal cells from stem cells obtained from adult bone marrow is of significant clinical interest in order to design new cell therapy protocols for several neurological disorders. The recent identification in adult bone marrow of stem cells derived from the neural crest stem cells (NCSC) might explain the neuronal phenotypic plasticity shown by bone marrow cells. However, little information is available about the nature of these cells compared to mesenchymal stem cells (MSC), including their similarities and differences. In this paper, using transcriptomic as well as proteomic technologies, we compared NCSC to MSC and stromal nestin-positive cells, all of them isolated from adult bone marrow. We demonstrated that the nestin-positive cell population, which was the first to be described as able to differentiate into functional neurons, was a mixed population of NCSC and MSC. More interestingly, we demonstrated that MSC shared with NCSC the same ability to truly differentiate into Tuj1-positive cells when co-cultivated with paraformaldehyde-fixed cerebellar granule neurons. Altogether, those results suggest that both NCSC and MSC can be considered as important tools for cellular therapies in order to replace neurons in various neurological diseases. [less ▲]

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See detailExpression of specific pathways in the inflamed synovial membrane of osteoarthritis patient: Identification of new potential key intermediates
Lambert, Cécile ULg; Dubuc, Jean-Emile; Hennuy, Benoît ULg et al

in Osteoarthritis and Cartilage (2012, April), 20(Supplement 1), 56

Purpose: Synovitis is a key factor in osteoarthritis (OA) pathophysiology, contributing to both patient symptoms and disease progression. In this study, using an original methodology comparing normal ... [more ▼]

Purpose: Synovitis is a key factor in osteoarthritis (OA) pathophysiology, contributing to both patient symptoms and disease progression. In this study, using an original methodology comparing normal/reactive (N/R) and inflammatory (I) synovial membranes zones, we investigated the gene expression profiles of synovial cells from these areas and identified differentially regulated pathways. <br />Methods: Synovial cells (SC) were isolated from OA synovial specimens obtained from 12 patients undergoing knee replacement. The inflammatory status of the synovial membrane was characterized by the surgeon according to macroscopic criteria including the synovial vascularization, the villi formation and the hypertrophic aspect of the tissue. At the surgery time, the synovial membrane was dissected and biopsies from N/R and I areas cultured separately for a period of 7 days. Total RNA was extracted using the RNeasy Mini Kit. RNA purity and quality were evaluated using the Experion RNA StdSens Analysis kit (Bio-rad Laboratories). Gene expression profiling between N/R and I areas was performed using Illumina’s multi-sample format Human HT-12 BeadChip (Illumina Inc.). Differential analysis was performed with the BRB array tools software. Class Comparison test between N/R and I areas was based on paired t-test where N/R and I were paired for each patient. The biological relevance of up- and down-regulated genes was analyses with Ingenuity Pathways Analysis (Ingenuity® Systems). Western blot was performed to confirm certain intermediate expression. <br />Results: From among 47000 probes, 17500 were filtered out. Probes with a p-value below than 0.005 were chosen and classified as up- or down-regulated ones. By this way, 896 differentially expressed genes between N/R and I zones were identified. Among these, 576 genes were upregulated (I/NR > 1.5) and 320 downregulated (I/NR < 0.75). With Ingenuity Pathways Analysis, a significant number of the top ranking differentially expressed genes were identified as inflammatory, Wnt and angiogenic pathways. Interleukin (IL)-6 and -8, chemokines (CXCL1, CXCL2, CXCL5, CXCL6, CXCL16) and arachidonate 5-lipoxygenase (ALOX5) were identified as the most upregulated in I zones in the inflammatory pathway. Interestingly, the alarmin S100A9 was found strongly upregulated in this pathway. Wnt5A and LRP (Low density lipoprotein receptor-related protein) 5 were upregulated whereas FZD (Frizzled homolog) 2 and DKK (dickkopf homolog) 3 were downregulated in the Wnt signaling pathway. Finally, stanniocalcin (STC)-1, an intermediate in angiogenesis was identified as the most upregulated gene in I zones compared to N/R zones. This difference of expression was confirmed at the protein level. <br />Conclusions: Using a unique culture system, this study is the first to identify different expression pattern between two areas of synovial membrane from the same OA patient. These differences concern several key pathways involved in OA pathogenesis, i.e. inflammation, Wnt and angiogenesis. This analysis also provided interesting information regarding new potent intermediates as S100A9 and STC-1. They could be potential targets for chondroitin sulfate, one of the most used molecules in the management of OA. New experiments are being perfomed at the moment to elucidate the potential effect of this molecule on these specific differentially expressed genes in the same culture system. [less ▲]

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See detailWnt1 and BMP2: two factors recruiting multipotent neural crest progenitors isolated from adult bone marrow
Glejzer, Aneta ULg; Laudet, Emerence ULg; Leprince, Pierre ULg et al

in Cellular and Molecular Life Sciences : CMLS (2011), 68/12

Recent studies have shown that neural crestderived progenitor cells can be found in diverse mammalian tissues including tissues that were not previously shown to contain neural crest derivatives, such as ... [more ▼]

Recent studies have shown that neural crestderived progenitor cells can be found in diverse mammalian tissues including tissues that were not previously shown to contain neural crest derivatives, such as bone marrow. The identification of those ‘‘new’’ neural crest-derived progenitor cells opens new strategies for developing autologous cell replacement therapies in regenerative medicine. However, their potential use is still a challenge as only few neural crest-derived progenitor cells were found in those new accessible locations. In this study, we developed a protocol, based on wnt1 and BMP2 effects, to enrich neural crest-derived cells from adult bone marrow. Those two factors are known to maintain and stimulate the proliferation of embryonic neural crest stem cells, however, their effects have never been characterized on neural crest cells isolated from adult tissues. Using multiple strategies from microarray to 2D-DIGE proteomic analyses, we characterized those recruited neural crest-derived cells, defining their identity and their differentiating abilities. [less ▲]

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See detailAn insight into normal and pathological pregnancies using large-scale microarrays: lessons from microarrays
Chaouat, G. R.; Rodde, N.; Petitbarat, M. et al

in Journal of Reproductive Immunology (2011), 89(2), 163-72

In the introduction, we briefly recall old but classic evidence that there is no tolerance to paternal alloantigens in a first pregnancy. Therefore, we performed small- and large-scale microarrays in CBA ... [more ▼]

In the introduction, we briefly recall old but classic evidence that there is no tolerance to paternal alloantigens in a first pregnancy. Therefore, we performed small- and large-scale microarrays in CBA × DBA/2 and CBA × BALB/c combinations, recently described as a murine model for preeclampsia. Our results are in line with other data suggesting a very early deregulation of local immune vascular events rather than a break of immune tolerance. Other data presented at the Tioman 2010 Preeclampsia Workshop supporting this hypothesis are briefly summarised, as well as indications and caveats from a recent human microarray on implantation failure and recurrent pregnancy loss. [less ▲]

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See detailThe repressing function of the oncoprotein BCL-3 requires CtBP while its polyubiquitination and degradation involve the E3 ligase TBLR1
Keutgens, Aurore ULg; Shostak, Kateryna ULg; Close, Pierre ULg et al

in Molecular & Cellular Biology (2010), 30

The nuclear and oncogenic BCL-3 protein activates or represses gene transcription when bound to NF-kB proteins p50 and p52, yet the molecules that specifically interact with BCL-3 and drive BCL-3-mediated ... [more ▼]

The nuclear and oncogenic BCL-3 protein activates or represses gene transcription when bound to NF-kB proteins p50 and p52, yet the molecules that specifically interact with BCL-3 and drive BCL-3-mediated effects on gene expression remain largely uncharacterized. Moreover, GSK3-mediated phosphorylation of BCL-3 triggers its degradation through the proteasome, but the proteins involved in this degradative pathway are poorly characterized. Biochemical purification of interacting partners of BCL-3 led to the identification of CtBP as a molecule required for the ability of BCL-3 to repress gene transcription. CtBP is also required for the oncogenic potential of BCL-3 and for its ability to inhibit UV-mediated cell apoptosis in keratinocytes. We also defined the E3 ligase TBLR1 as a protein involved in BCL-3 degradation through a GSK3-independent pathway. Thus, our data demonstrate that the LSD1/CtBP complex is required for the repressing abilities of an oncogenic IkB protein, and they establish a functional link between the E3 ligase TBLR1 and NF-kB. [less ▲]

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See detailMatrix Metalloproteinase-9 gene induction by a truncated oncogenic NF-κB2 protein involves the recruitment of MLL1 and MLL2 H3K4 histone methyltransferase complexes.
Robert, Isabelle ULg; Aussems, Marie ULg; Keutgens, Aurore ULg et al

in Oncogene (2009), 28(13), 1626-1638

Constitutive nuclear factor (NF)-kappaB activation in haematological malignancies is caused in several cases by loss of function mutations within the coding sequence of NF-kappaB inhibitory molecules such ... [more ▼]

Constitutive nuclear factor (NF)-kappaB activation in haematological malignancies is caused in several cases by loss of function mutations within the coding sequence of NF-kappaB inhibitory molecules such as IkappaBalpha or p100. Hut-78, a truncated form of p100, constitutively generates p52 and contributes to the development of T-cell lymphomas but the molecular mechanism underlying this oncogenic potential remains unclear. We show here that MMP9 gene expression is induced through the alternative NF-kappaB-activating pathway in fibroblasts and also on Hut-78 or p52 overexpression in fibroblasts as well as in lymphoma cells. p52 is critical for Hut-78-mediated MMP9 gene induction as a Hut-78 mutant as well as other truncated NF-kappaB2 proteins that are not processed into p52 failed to induce the expression of this metalloproteinase. Conversely, MMP9 gene expression is impaired in p52-depleted HUT-78 cells. Interestingly, MLL1 and MLL2 H3K4 methyltransferase complexes are tethered by p52 on the MMP9 but not on the IkappaBalpha promoter, and the H3K4 trimethyltransferase activity recruited on the MMP9 promoter is impaired in p52-depleted HUT-78 cells. Moreover, MLL1 and MLL2 are associated with Hut-78 in a native chromatin-enriched extract. Thus, we identified a molecular mechanism by which the recruitment of a H3K4 histone methyltransferase complex on the promoter of a NF-kappaB-dependent gene induces its expression and potentially the invasive potential of lymphoma cells harbouring constitutive activity of the alternative NF-kappaB-activating pathway. [less ▲]

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See detailNew asthma biomarkers: lessons from murine models of acute and chronic asthma.
Di Valentin, Emmanuel ULg; Crahay, Céline; Garbacki, Nancy ULg et al

in American Journal of Physiology - Lung Cellular and Molecular Physiology (2009), 296(2), 185-97

Many patients suffering from asthma are not fully controlled by currently available treatments, and some of them display an airway remodeling leading to exaggerated lung function decline. The aim of the ... [more ▼]

Many patients suffering from asthma are not fully controlled by currently available treatments, and some of them display an airway remodeling leading to exaggerated lung function decline. The aim of the present study was to unveil new mediators in asthma to better understand pathophysiology and propose or validate new potential therapeutic targets. A mouse model of asthma mimicking acute or chronic asthma disease was used to select genes undergoing a modulation in both acute and chronic conditions. Mice were exposed to ovalbumin or PBS for 1, 5, and 10 wk [short-, intermediate-, and long-term model (ST, IT, and LT)], and gene expression in the lung was studied using an Affymetrix 430 2.0 genome-wide microarray and further confirmed by RT-PCR and immunohistochemistry for selected targets. We report that 598, 1,406, and 117 genes were upregulated and 490, 153, 321 downregulated at ST, IT, and LT, respectively. Genes related to mucous secretion displayed a progressively amplified expression during the allergen exposure protocol, whereas genes corresponding to growth and differentiation factors, matrix metalloproteinases, and collagens were mainly upregulated at IT. By contrast, genes related to cell division were upregulated at ST and IT and were downregulated at LT. In this study, besides confirming that Arg1, Slc26a4, Ear11, and Mmp12 genes are highly modulated throughout the asthma pathology, we show for the first time that Agr2, Scin, and Cd209e genes are overexpressed throughout the allergen exposure and might therefore be considered as suitable new potential targets for the treatment of asthma. [less ▲]

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