References of "Hennuy, Benoît"
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See detailIn Vivo Tumorigenesis Was Observed after Injection of In Vitro Expanded Neural Crest Stem Cells Isolated from Adult Bone Marrow
Wislet, Sabine ULg; Poulet, Christophe ULg; Neirinckx, Virginie ULg et al

in PLoS ONE (2012), 7(10), 46425

Bone marrow stromal cells are adult multipotent cells that represent an attractive tool in cellular therapy strategies. Several studies have reported that in vitro passaging of mesenchymal stem cells ... [more ▼]

Bone marrow stromal cells are adult multipotent cells that represent an attractive tool in cellular therapy strategies. Several studies have reported that in vitro passaging of mesenchymal stem cells alters the functional and biological properties of those cells, leading to the accumulation of genetic aberrations. Recent studies described bone marrow stromal cells (BMSC) as mixed populations of cells including mesenchymal (MSC) and neural crest stem cells (NCSC). Here, we report the transformation of NCSC into tumorigenic cells, after in vitro long-term passaging. Indeed, the characterization of 6 neural crest-derived clones revealed the presence of one tumorigenic clone. Transcriptomic analyses of this clone highlighted, among others, numerous cell cycle checkpoint modifications and chromosome 11q down-regulation (suggesting a deletion of chromosome 11q) compared with the other clones. Moreover, unsupervised analysis such as a dendrogram generated after agglomerative hierarchical clustering comparing several transcriptomic data showed important similarities between the tumorigenic neural crest-derived clone and mammary tumor cell lines. Altogether, it appeared that NCSC isolated from adult bone marrow represents a potential danger for cellular therapy, and consequently, we recommend that phenotypic, functional and genetic assays should be performed on bone marrow mesenchymal and neural crest stem cells before in vivo use, to demonstrate whether their biological properties, after ex vivo expansion, remain suitable for clinical application. [less ▲]

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See detailMesenchymal stem cells and neural crest stem cells from adult bone marrow: characterization of their surprising similarities and differences.
Wislet, Sabine ULg; Laudet, Emerence ULg; Neirinckx, Virginie ULg et al

in Cellular and Molecular Life Sciences : CMLS (2012), 69(15), 2593-2608

The generation of neuronal cells from stem cells obtained from adult bone marrow is of significant clinical interest in order to design new cell therapy protocols for several neurological disorders. The ... [more ▼]

The generation of neuronal cells from stem cells obtained from adult bone marrow is of significant clinical interest in order to design new cell therapy protocols for several neurological disorders. The recent identification in adult bone marrow of stem cells derived from the neural crest stem cells (NCSC) might explain the neuronal phenotypic plasticity shown by bone marrow cells. However, little information is available about the nature of these cells compared to mesenchymal stem cells (MSC), including their similarities and differences. In this paper, using transcriptomic as well as proteomic technologies, we compared NCSC to MSC and stromal nestin-positive cells, all of them isolated from adult bone marrow. We demonstrated that the nestin-positive cell population, which was the first to be described as able to differentiate into functional neurons, was a mixed population of NCSC and MSC. More interestingly, we demonstrated that MSC shared with NCSC the same ability to truly differentiate into Tuj1-positive cells when co-cultivated with paraformaldehyde-fixed cerebellar granule neurons. Altogether, those results suggest that both NCSC and MSC can be considered as important tools for cellular therapies in order to replace neurons in various neurological diseases. [less ▲]

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See detailExpression of specific pathways in the inflamed synovial membrane of osteoarthritis patient: Identification of new potential key intermediates
Lambert, Cécile ULg; Dubuc, Jean-Emile; Hennuy, Benoît ULg et al

in Osteoarthritis and Cartilage (2012, April), 20(Supplement 1), 56

Purpose: Synovitis is a key factor in osteoarthritis (OA) pathophysiology, contributing to both patient symptoms and disease progression. In this study, using an original methodology comparing normal ... [more ▼]

Purpose: Synovitis is a key factor in osteoarthritis (OA) pathophysiology, contributing to both patient symptoms and disease progression. In this study, using an original methodology comparing normal/reactive (N/R) and inflammatory (I) synovial membranes zones, we investigated the gene expression profiles of synovial cells from these areas and identified differentially regulated pathways. <br />Methods: Synovial cells (SC) were isolated from OA synovial specimens obtained from 12 patients undergoing knee replacement. The inflammatory status of the synovial membrane was characterized by the surgeon according to macroscopic criteria including the synovial vascularization, the villi formation and the hypertrophic aspect of the tissue. At the surgery time, the synovial membrane was dissected and biopsies from N/R and I areas cultured separately for a period of 7 days. Total RNA was extracted using the RNeasy Mini Kit. RNA purity and quality were evaluated using the Experion RNA StdSens Analysis kit (Bio-rad Laboratories). Gene expression profiling between N/R and I areas was performed using Illumina’s multi-sample format Human HT-12 BeadChip (Illumina Inc.). Differential analysis was performed with the BRB array tools software. Class Comparison test between N/R and I areas was based on paired t-test where N/R and I were paired for each patient. The biological relevance of up- and down-regulated genes was analyses with Ingenuity Pathways Analysis (Ingenuity® Systems). Western blot was performed to confirm certain intermediate expression. <br />Results: From among 47000 probes, 17500 were filtered out. Probes with a p-value below than 0.005 were chosen and classified as up- or down-regulated ones. By this way, 896 differentially expressed genes between N/R and I zones were identified. Among these, 576 genes were upregulated (I/NR > 1.5) and 320 downregulated (I/NR < 0.75). With Ingenuity Pathways Analysis, a significant number of the top ranking differentially expressed genes were identified as inflammatory, Wnt and angiogenic pathways. Interleukin (IL)-6 and -8, chemokines (CXCL1, CXCL2, CXCL5, CXCL6, CXCL16) and arachidonate 5-lipoxygenase (ALOX5) were identified as the most upregulated in I zones in the inflammatory pathway. Interestingly, the alarmin S100A9 was found strongly upregulated in this pathway. Wnt5A and LRP (Low density lipoprotein receptor-related protein) 5 were upregulated whereas FZD (Frizzled homolog) 2 and DKK (dickkopf homolog) 3 were downregulated in the Wnt signaling pathway. Finally, stanniocalcin (STC)-1, an intermediate in angiogenesis was identified as the most upregulated gene in I zones compared to N/R zones. This difference of expression was confirmed at the protein level. <br />Conclusions: Using a unique culture system, this study is the first to identify different expression pattern between two areas of synovial membrane from the same OA patient. These differences concern several key pathways involved in OA pathogenesis, i.e. inflammation, Wnt and angiogenesis. This analysis also provided interesting information regarding new potent intermediates as S100A9 and STC-1. They could be potential targets for chondroitin sulfate, one of the most used molecules in the management of OA. New experiments are being perfomed at the moment to elucidate the potential effect of this molecule on these specific differentially expressed genes in the same culture system. [less ▲]

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See detailWnt1 and BMP2: two factors recruiting multipotent neural crest progenitors isolated from adult bone marrow
Glejzer, Aneta ULg; Laudet, Emerence ULg; Leprince, Pierre ULg et al

in Cellular and Molecular Life Sciences : CMLS (2011), 68/12

Recent studies have shown that neural crestderived progenitor cells can be found in diverse mammalian tissues including tissues that were not previously shown to contain neural crest derivatives, such as ... [more ▼]

Recent studies have shown that neural crestderived progenitor cells can be found in diverse mammalian tissues including tissues that were not previously shown to contain neural crest derivatives, such as bone marrow. The identification of those ‘‘new’’ neural crest-derived progenitor cells opens new strategies for developing autologous cell replacement therapies in regenerative medicine. However, their potential use is still a challenge as only few neural crest-derived progenitor cells were found in those new accessible locations. In this study, we developed a protocol, based on wnt1 and BMP2 effects, to enrich neural crest-derived cells from adult bone marrow. Those two factors are known to maintain and stimulate the proliferation of embryonic neural crest stem cells, however, their effects have never been characterized on neural crest cells isolated from adult tissues. Using multiple strategies from microarray to 2D-DIGE proteomic analyses, we characterized those recruited neural crest-derived cells, defining their identity and their differentiating abilities. [less ▲]

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See detailAn insight into normal and pathological pregnancies using large-scale microarrays: lessons from microarrays
Chaouat, G. R.; Rodde, N.; Petitbarat, M. et al

in Journal of Reproductive Immunology (2011), 89(2), 163-72

In the introduction, we briefly recall old but classic evidence that there is no tolerance to paternal alloantigens in a first pregnancy. Therefore, we performed small- and large-scale microarrays in CBA ... [more ▼]

In the introduction, we briefly recall old but classic evidence that there is no tolerance to paternal alloantigens in a first pregnancy. Therefore, we performed small- and large-scale microarrays in CBA × DBA/2 and CBA × BALB/c combinations, recently described as a murine model for preeclampsia. Our results are in line with other data suggesting a very early deregulation of local immune vascular events rather than a break of immune tolerance. Other data presented at the Tioman 2010 Preeclampsia Workshop supporting this hypothesis are briefly summarised, as well as indications and caveats from a recent human microarray on implantation failure and recurrent pregnancy loss. [less ▲]

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See detailThe repressing function of the oncoprotein BCL-3 requires CtBP while its polyubiquitination and degradation involve the E3 ligase TBLR1
Keutgens, Aurore ULg; Shostak, Kateryna ULg; Close, Pierre ULg et al

in Molecular & Cellular Biology (2010), 30

The nuclear and oncogenic BCL-3 protein activates or represses gene transcription when bound to NF-kB proteins p50 and p52, yet the molecules that specifically interact with BCL-3 and drive BCL-3-mediated ... [more ▼]

The nuclear and oncogenic BCL-3 protein activates or represses gene transcription when bound to NF-kB proteins p50 and p52, yet the molecules that specifically interact with BCL-3 and drive BCL-3-mediated effects on gene expression remain largely uncharacterized. Moreover, GSK3-mediated phosphorylation of BCL-3 triggers its degradation through the proteasome, but the proteins involved in this degradative pathway are poorly characterized. Biochemical purification of interacting partners of BCL-3 led to the identification of CtBP as a molecule required for the ability of BCL-3 to repress gene transcription. CtBP is also required for the oncogenic potential of BCL-3 and for its ability to inhibit UV-mediated cell apoptosis in keratinocytes. We also defined the E3 ligase TBLR1 as a protein involved in BCL-3 degradation through a GSK3-independent pathway. Thus, our data demonstrate that the LSD1/CtBP complex is required for the repressing abilities of an oncogenic IkB protein, and they establish a functional link between the E3 ligase TBLR1 and NF-kB. [less ▲]

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See detailMatrix Metalloproteinase-9 gene induction by a truncated oncogenic NF-κB2 protein involves the recruitment of MLL1 and MLL2 H3K4 histone methyltransferase complexes.
Robert, Isabelle ULg; Aussems, Marie ULg; Keutgens, Aurore ULg et al

in Oncogene (2009), 28(13), 1626-1638

Constitutive nuclear factor (NF)-kappaB activation in haematological malignancies is caused in several cases by loss of function mutations within the coding sequence of NF-kappaB inhibitory molecules such ... [more ▼]

Constitutive nuclear factor (NF)-kappaB activation in haematological malignancies is caused in several cases by loss of function mutations within the coding sequence of NF-kappaB inhibitory molecules such as IkappaBalpha or p100. Hut-78, a truncated form of p100, constitutively generates p52 and contributes to the development of T-cell lymphomas but the molecular mechanism underlying this oncogenic potential remains unclear. We show here that MMP9 gene expression is induced through the alternative NF-kappaB-activating pathway in fibroblasts and also on Hut-78 or p52 overexpression in fibroblasts as well as in lymphoma cells. p52 is critical for Hut-78-mediated MMP9 gene induction as a Hut-78 mutant as well as other truncated NF-kappaB2 proteins that are not processed into p52 failed to induce the expression of this metalloproteinase. Conversely, MMP9 gene expression is impaired in p52-depleted HUT-78 cells. Interestingly, MLL1 and MLL2 H3K4 methyltransferase complexes are tethered by p52 on the MMP9 but not on the IkappaBalpha promoter, and the H3K4 trimethyltransferase activity recruited on the MMP9 promoter is impaired in p52-depleted HUT-78 cells. Moreover, MLL1 and MLL2 are associated with Hut-78 in a native chromatin-enriched extract. Thus, we identified a molecular mechanism by which the recruitment of a H3K4 histone methyltransferase complex on the promoter of a NF-kappaB-dependent gene induces its expression and potentially the invasive potential of lymphoma cells harbouring constitutive activity of the alternative NF-kappaB-activating pathway. [less ▲]

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See detailNew asthma biomarkers: lessons from murine models of acute and chronic asthma.
Di Valentin, Emmanuel ULg; Crahay, Céline; Garbacki, Nancy ULg et al

in American Journal of Physiology - Lung Cellular and Molecular Physiology (2009), 296(2), 185-97

Many patients suffering from asthma are not fully controlled by currently available treatments, and some of them display an airway remodeling leading to exaggerated lung function decline. The aim of the ... [more ▼]

Many patients suffering from asthma are not fully controlled by currently available treatments, and some of them display an airway remodeling leading to exaggerated lung function decline. The aim of the present study was to unveil new mediators in asthma to better understand pathophysiology and propose or validate new potential therapeutic targets. A mouse model of asthma mimicking acute or chronic asthma disease was used to select genes undergoing a modulation in both acute and chronic conditions. Mice were exposed to ovalbumin or PBS for 1, 5, and 10 wk [short-, intermediate-, and long-term model (ST, IT, and LT)], and gene expression in the lung was studied using an Affymetrix 430 2.0 genome-wide microarray and further confirmed by RT-PCR and immunohistochemistry for selected targets. We report that 598, 1,406, and 117 genes were upregulated and 490, 153, 321 downregulated at ST, IT, and LT, respectively. Genes related to mucous secretion displayed a progressively amplified expression during the allergen exposure protocol, whereas genes corresponding to growth and differentiation factors, matrix metalloproteinases, and collagens were mainly upregulated at IT. By contrast, genes related to cell division were upregulated at ST and IT and were downregulated at LT. In this study, besides confirming that Arg1, Slc26a4, Ear11, and Mmp12 genes are highly modulated throughout the asthma pathology, we show for the first time that Agr2, Scin, and Cd209e genes are overexpressed throughout the allergen exposure and might therefore be considered as suitable new potential targets for the treatment of asthma. [less ▲]

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See detailDeregulated expression of pro-survival and pro-apoptotic p53-dependent genes upon Elongator deficiency in colon cancer cells.
Cornez, Isabelle ULg; Creppe, Catherine ULg; Gillard, Magali ULg et al

in Biochemical Pharmacology (2008), 75

Elongator, a multi-subunit complex assembled by the IkappaB kinase-associated protein (IKAP)/hELP1 scaffold protein is involved in transcriptional elongation in the nucleus as well as in tRNA ... [more ▼]

Elongator, a multi-subunit complex assembled by the IkappaB kinase-associated protein (IKAP)/hELP1 scaffold protein is involved in transcriptional elongation in the nucleus as well as in tRNA modifications in the cytoplasm. However, the biological processes regulated by Elongator in human cells only start to be elucidated. Here we demonstrate that IKAP/hELP1 depleted colon cancer-derived cells show enhanced basal expression of some but not all pro-apoptotic p53-dependent genes such as BAX. Moreover, Elongator deficiency causes increased basal and daunomycin-induced expression of the pro-survival serum- and glucocorticoid-induced protein kinase (SGK) gene through a p53-dependent pathway. Thus, our data collectively demonstrate that Elongator deficiency triggers the activation of p53-dependent genes harbouring opposite functions with respect to apoptosis. [less ▲]

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See detailRole of IKK and ERK pathways in intrinsic inflammation of cystic fibrosis airways
Verhaeghe, Catherine ULg; Remouchamps, Caroline ULg; Hennuy, Benoît ULg et al

in Biochemical Pharmacology (2007), 73(12), 1982-1994

in cystic fibrosis (CF) patients, pulmonary inflammation is a major cause of morbidity and mortality and may precede bacterial colonization. The aim of the present study was to investigate the molecular ... [more ▼]

in cystic fibrosis (CF) patients, pulmonary inflammation is a major cause of morbidity and mortality and may precede bacterial colonization. The aim of the present study was to investigate the molecular mechanisms underlying intrinsic inflammation in cystic fibrosis air-ways. Using different cystic fibrosis cell models, we first demonstrated that, beside a high constitutive nuclear factor of kappaB (NF-kappa B) activity, CF cells showed a higher activator protein-1 (AP-1) activity as compared to their respective control cells. Gene expression profiles, confirmed by RT-PCR and ELISA, showed over-expression of numerous NF-KB and AP-1-dependent pro-inflammatory genes in CF cells in comparison with control cells. Activation of NF-KB was correlated with higher inhibitor of kappa B kinase (IKK) activity. In addition, Bio-plex phosphoprotein assays revealed higher extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK) phosphorylation in CFT-2 cells. Inhibition of this kinase strongly decreased expression of pro-inflammatory genes coding for growth-regulated proteins (Gro-alpha, Gro-beta and Gro-gamma) and interleukins (IL-1 beta, IL-6 and IL-8). Moreover, inhibition of secreted interleukin-1 beta (IL-1 beta) and basic fibroblast growth factor (bFGF) with neutralizing antibodies reduced pro-inflammatory gene expression. Our data thus demonstrated for the first time that the absence of functional cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) at the plasma membrane leads to an intrinsic AP-1, in addition to NF-kappa B, activity and consequently to a pro-inflammatory state sustained through autocrine factors such as IL-1 beta and bFGF. (c) 2007 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved. [less ▲]

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See detailAlpha-fetoprotein controls female fertility and prenatal development of the gonadotropin-releasing hormone pathway through an antiestrogenic action
De Mees, Christelle; Laes, Jean-François; Bakker, Julie ULg et al

in Molecular and Cellular Biology (2006), 26(5), 2012-2018

It has been shown previously that female mice homozygous for an alpha-fetoprotein (AFP) null allele are sterile as a result of anovulation, probably due to a defect in the hypothalamic-pituitary axis ... [more ▼]

It has been shown previously that female mice homozygous for an alpha-fetoprotein (AFP) null allele are sterile as a result of anovulation, probably due to a defect in the hypothalamic-pituitary axis. Here we show that these female mice exhibit specific anomalies in the expression of numerous genes in the pituitary, including genes involved in the gonadotropin-releasing hormone pathway, which are underexpressed. In the hypothalamus, the gonadotropin-releasing hormone gene, Gnrh1, was also found to be down-regulated. However, pituitary gene expression could be normalized and fertility could be rescued by blocking prenatal estrogen synthesis using an aromatase inhibitor. These results show that AFP protects the developing female brain from the adverse effects of prenatal estrogen exposure and clarify a long-running debate on the role of this fetal protein in brain sexual differentiation. [less ▲]

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See detailChromosomal patterns of gene expression from microarray data: methodology, validation and clinical relevance in gliomas.
Turkheimer, Federico E; Roncaroli, Federico; Hennuy, Benoît ULg et al

in BMC Bioinformatics (2006), 7

BACKGROUND: Expression microarrays represent a powerful technique for the simultaneous investigation of thousands of genes. The evidence that genes are not randomly distributed in the genome and that ... [more ▼]

BACKGROUND: Expression microarrays represent a powerful technique for the simultaneous investigation of thousands of genes. The evidence that genes are not randomly distributed in the genome and that their coordinated expression depends on their position on chromosomes has highlighted the need for mathematical approaches to exploit this dependency for the analysis of expression data-sets. RESULTS: We have devised a novel mathematical technique (CHROMOWAVE) based on the Haar wavelet transform and applied it to a dataset obtained with the Affymetrix HG-U133_Plus_2 array in 27 gliomas. CHROMOWAVE generated multi-chromosomal pattern featuring low expression in chromosomes 1p, 4, 9q, 13, 18, and 19q. This pattern was not only statistically robust but also clinically relevant as it was predictive of favourable outcome. This finding was replicated on a data-set independently acquired by another laboratory. FISH analysis indicated that monosomy 1p and 19q was a frequent feature of tumours displaying the CHROMOWAVE pattern but that allelic loss on chromosomes 4, 9q, 13 and 18 was much less common. CONCLUSION: The ability to detect expression changes of spatially related genes and to map their position on chromosomes makes CHROMOWAVE a valuable screening method for the identification and display of regional gene expression changes of clinical relevance. In this study, FISH data showed that monosomy was frequently associated with diffuse low gene expression on chromosome 1p and 19q but not on chromosomes 4, 9q, 13 and 18. Comparative genomic hybridisation, allelic polymorphism analysis and methylation studies are in progress in order to identify the various mechanisms involved in this multi-chromosomal expression pattern. [less ▲]

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See detailProstatic androgen repressed message-1 (PARM-1) may play a role in prostatic cell immortalisation.
Cornet, Anne ULg; Hanon, Emmanuel; Reiter, Eric R et al

in Prostate (The) (2003), 56(3), 220-30

BACKGROUND: Prostatic androgen-repressed message-1 (PARM-1) has been cloned from the prostate. The transcript of the PARM-1 gene is overexpressed during regression of the prostate after androgen ... [more ▼]

BACKGROUND: Prostatic androgen-repressed message-1 (PARM-1) has been cloned from the prostate. The transcript of the PARM-1 gene is overexpressed during regression of the prostate after androgen withdrawal. The regulation of PARM-1 by androgens is limited to this organ. We have studied the effects of PARM-1 overexpression in malignant prostate cells. METHODS: The PARM-1 cDNA was introduced into the rat cancer cell line MAT LyLu along with a doxycycline-dependent regulator. RESULTS: Maximal expression of PARM-1 (fivefold induction) was achieved by incubating the cells with 2 microM doxycycline for 48 hr. A study investigating the effect of PARM-1 overexpression on the transcription of 588 genes has shown that the TLP1 gene (encoding rat telomerase protein component 1) was the most up-regulated (fourfold). In addition, a dose-dependent increase in telomerase activity was observed in cells overexpressing PARM-1. In vivo, the androgen-deprived prostate showed an increased TLP1 level and increased telomerase activity. CONCLUSIONS: Increased telomerase activity is often associated with the immortalisation of cancer cell lines, particularly prostatic ones. This could mean that PARM-1 is involved, via increased telomerase activity, in a survival program enabling certain prostatic cells to resist apoptosis, thus conferring a selective advantage to pre-cancerous or cancerous cells. [less ▲]

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See detailA novel messenger ribonucleic acid homologous to human MAGE-D is strongly expressed in rat Sertoli cells and weakly in Leydig cells and is regulated by follitropin, lutropin, and prolactin.
Hennuy, Benoît ULg; Reiter, E.; Cornet, Anne ULg et al

in Endocrinology (2000), 141(10), 3821-31

We have cloned a novel complementary DNA whose expression was decreased in rat Sertoli cell cultures after treatment with FSH. This complementary DNA encodes a protein of 570 amino acids and shares 92 ... [more ▼]

We have cloned a novel complementary DNA whose expression was decreased in rat Sertoli cell cultures after treatment with FSH. This complementary DNA encodes a protein of 570 amino acids and shares 92% homology with the human MAGE-D protein. In contrast to other MAGE genes (A, B, or C), we have shown that MAGE-D expression was ubiquitous in healthy rat tissues. In the seminiferous tubules, the MAGE-D was expressed in Sertoli cells but not in germ cells as demonstrated by RT-PCR and in situ hybridization, whereas for the other MAGE genes, expression has been shown to be restricted to germ cells. Interestingly, MAGE-D was also detected for the first time in the female gonad by Northern blotting. In MLTC-1 cells (mouse Leydig tumor cell line-1), LH and PRL stimulated MAGE-D expression. Using hypophysectomized rats, it was confirmed that FSH decreased MAGE-D expression, whereas LH and PRL increased MAGE-D messenger RNA level in the whole testis most probably through a direct action on Leydig cells. As MAGE-D is present in both the seminiferous compartment and interstitium and hormonally regulated in each, it is possible that it has specific functions in each compartment during the development and the maintenance of the testis. [less ▲]

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See detailEffects of pituitary hormones on the prostate.
Reiter, E.; Hennuy, Benoît ULg; Bruyninx, M. et al

in Prostate (1999), 38(2), 159-65

BACKGROUND: Although essential, androgens alone are not sufficient to induce normal growth and functionality of the prostate. Nonandrogenic hormones must also be involved in the proliferation of the ... [more ▼]

BACKGROUND: Although essential, androgens alone are not sufficient to induce normal growth and functionality of the prostate. Nonandrogenic hormones must also be involved in the proliferation of the prostate cancer cells which do not respond to antiandrogenic therapy and which thus become androgen-independent. Prolactin, but also growth hormone and luteinizing hormone, are potentially able to act on both normal and abnormal prostatic cells. METHODS: In this review we summarize data from the literature concerning the physiological and pathological implications of prolactin, growth hormone, and luteinizing hormone on the prostate. RESULTS: In rodent prostates, prolactin and growth hormone can induce a variety of effects independently of androgens (e.g., transactivation of certain genes, or synthesis of the major secretion products). Moreover, hyperprolactinemia is responsible for inflammation and dysplasia of the gland, while growth hormone promotes the development of prostate tumors in vivo in the mouse and rat. Growth hormone acts on the gland directly, through prostatic growth hormone receptors, and/or indirectly via the stimulation of insulin-like growth factor-I (IGF-I) synthesis in the liver. Luteinizing hormone receptor is expressed in rat and human prostates. Luteinizing hormone increases the amount of various transcripts in the rat prostate through an androgen-independent pathway. CONCLUSIONS: Prolactin, growth hormone, and luteinizing hormone, alone or synergistically with androgens, play physiologically significant roles in the normal prostate. The involvement of these hormones in the development of benign prostatic hyperplasia and prostatic carcinoma is an issue that needs to be addressed. [less ▲]

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See detailA novel gene overexpressed in the prostate of castrated rats: hormonal regulation, relationship to apoptosis and to acquired prostatic cell androgen independence.
Bruyninx, M.; Hennuy, Benoît ULg; Cornet, Anne ULg et al

in Endocrinology (1999), 140(10), 4789-99

We have identified a novel complementary DNA (cDNA) corresponding to a gene overexpressed in the rat ventral prostate after castration. This cDNA displays 89.4% identity with 453 bp of a mouse EST and 81 ... [more ▼]

We have identified a novel complementary DNA (cDNA) corresponding to a gene overexpressed in the rat ventral prostate after castration. This cDNA displays 89.4% identity with 453 bp of a mouse EST and 81.5% identity with 157 bp of a human EST and was named PARM-1 for prostatic androgen-repressed message-1. The complete cDNA is 1187 bp long and codes for a protein of 298 amino acids that contains four potential glycosylation sites and three half cystinyl residues. The PARM-1 gene was found to be expressed at quite low levels in most rat tissues including those of the urogenital tract. The kinetic of induction of PARM-1 gene in the prostate was highly correlated to the development of apoptosis in the whole organ. Supplementation of castrated animals with androgens reversed both the process of apoptosis and the overexpression of PARM-1 gene. Supplementation with estrogens did not result in an increase in the PARM-1 messenger RNA levels when compared with the castration alone. However, the treatment resulted in a more rapid return to intact levels in the castrated plus estrogen group. When apoptosis of testis and prostate was induced in vivo by hypophysectomy, it was found that PARM-1 was only overexpressed in the prostate. Therefore, PARM-1 seems to be regulated by androgens only in the prostate. Using in situ hybridization and immunohistological techniques, we have shown that PARM-1 gene product is found exclusively in the epithelial cells of involuting prostate. Analysis by flow cytometry of MAT LyLu epithelial cells transiently expressing PARM-1 protein did not allow us to demonstrate a direct effect of PARM-1 gene overexpression on the programmed death of the transfected cells. Treatment of MAT LyLu cells by transforming growth factor-beta induced apoptosis but had no effect on PARM-1 production. However PARM-1 protein has been detected by Western blotting in various cell lines such as MAT LyLu, MAT Lu, and PIF, which are androgen independent. This would suggest that PARM-1 gene product would be a marker for acquired androgen-independence of these tumor cells. [less ▲]

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See detailGènes impliqués dans l'apoptose prostatique provoquée par un déficit androgénique
Bruyninx, Marc; Cornet, Anne ULg; Hennuy, Benoît ULg et al

in Medecine Sciences : M/S (1998), 14(5), 572-579

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See detailLuteinizing hormone increases the abundance of various transcripts, independently of the androgens, in the rat prostate.
Reiter, E.; Poncin, Joseph ULg; Hennuy, Benoît ULg et al

in Biochemical and Biophysical Research Communications (1997), 233(1), 108-12

Differential display analysis was carried out to find, in the rat prostate, genes that could be regulated by Luteinizing Hormone (LH), independently of the androgens. Hypophysectomized and castrated adult ... [more ▼]

Differential display analysis was carried out to find, in the rat prostate, genes that could be regulated by Luteinizing Hormone (LH), independently of the androgens. Hypophysectomized and castrated adult rats were treated with either LH, testosterone or saline. Regulated discrete bands have been eluted and reamplified. After Northern blotting, the levels of mRNA corresponding to 8 PCR fragments were significantly increased by LH treatment. None of these inserts were found to be induced by testosterone. One insert was subcloned, sequenced and identified as the ribosomial protein S 23. A competitive RT-PCR assay was carried out on the full length S 23 cDNA and confirmed that its mRNA levels were stimulated by LH but not by testosterone. These results strongly suggest that the LH membrane receptor, previously shown to be expressed in the rat prostate, has a physiological significance in this organ. Moreover, it appears that the effect of LH on the rat prostate are independent of the androgens. [less ▲]

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See detailChloride Permeability of Rat Brain Membrane Vesicles Correlates with Thiamine Triphosphate Content
Bettendorff, Lucien ULg; Hennuy, Benoît ULg; De Clerck, Anne et al

in Brain Research (1994), 652(1), 157-160

Incubation of rat brain homogenates with thiamine or thiamine diphosphate (TDP) leads to a synthesis of thiamine triphosphate (TTP). In membrane vesicles subsequently prepared from the homogenates ... [more ▼]

Incubation of rat brain homogenates with thiamine or thiamine diphosphate (TDP) leads to a synthesis of thiamine triphosphate (TTP). In membrane vesicles subsequently prepared from the homogenates, increased TTP content correlates with increased 36Cl- uptake. A hyperbolic relationship was obtained with a K0.5 of 0.27 nmol TTP/mg protein. In crude mitochondrial fractions from the brains of animals previously treated with thiamine or sulbutiamine, a positive correlation between 36Cl- uptake and TTP content was found. These results, together with other results previously obtained with the patch-clamp technique, suggest that TTP is an activator of chloride channels having a large unit conductance. [less ▲]

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