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See detailValidation of subject-specific cardiovascular system models from porcine measurements.
Revie, J. A.; Stevenson, D. J.; Chase, J. G. et al

in Computer Methods & Programs in Biomedicine (2013), 109(2),

A previously validated mathematical model of the cardiovascular system (CVS) is made subject-specific using an iterative, proportional gain-based identification method. Prior works utilised a complete set ... [more ▼]

A previously validated mathematical model of the cardiovascular system (CVS) is made subject-specific using an iterative, proportional gain-based identification method. Prior works utilised a complete set of experimentally measured data that is not clinically typical or applicable. In this paper, parameters are identified using proportional gain-based control and a minimal, clinically available set of measurements. The new method makes use of several intermediary steps through identification of smaller compartmental models of CVS to reduce the number of parameters identified simultaneously and increase the convergence stability of the method. This new, clinically relevant, minimal measurement approach is validated using a porcine model of acute pulmonary embolism (APE). Trials were performed on five pigs, each inserted with three autologous blood clots of decreasing size over a period of four to five hours. All experiments were reviewed and approved by the Ethics Committee of the Medical Faculty at the University of Liege, Belgium. Continuous aortic and pulmonary artery pressures (P(ao), P(pa)) were measured along with left and right ventricle pressure and volume waveforms. Subject-specific CVS models were identified from global end diastolic volume (GEDV), stroke volume (SV), P(ao), and P(pa) measurements, with the mean volumes and maximum pressures of the left and right ventricles used to verify the accuracy of the fitted models. The inputs (GEDV, SV, P(ao), P(pa)) used in the identification process were matched by the CVS model to errors <0.5%. Prediction of the mean ventricular volumes and maximum ventricular pressures not used to fit the model compared experimental measurements to median absolute errors of 4.3% and 4.4%, which are equivalent to the measurement errors of currently used monitoring devices in the ICU ( approximately 5-10%). These results validate the potential for implementing this approach in the intensive care unit. [less ▲]

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See detailPatient specific identification of the cardiac driver function in a cardiovascular system model.
Hann, C. E.; Revie, J.; Stevenson, D. et al

in Computer Methods & Programs in Biomedicine (2011)

The cardiac muscle activation or driver function, is a major determinant of cardiovascular dynamics, and is often approximated by the ratio of the left ventricle pressure to the left ventricle volume. In ... [more ▼]

The cardiac muscle activation or driver function, is a major determinant of cardiovascular dynamics, and is often approximated by the ratio of the left ventricle pressure to the left ventricle volume. In an intensive care unit, the left ventricle pressure is usually never measured, and the left ventricle volume is only measured occasionally by echocardiography, so is not available real-time. This paper develops a method for identifying the driver function based on correlates with geometrical features in the aortic pressure waveform. The method is included in an overall cardiovascular modelling approach, and is clinically validated on a porcine model of pulmonary embolism. For validation a comparison is done between the optimized parameters for a baseline model, which uses the direct measurements of the left ventricle pressure and volume, and the optimized parameters from the approximated driver function. The parameters do not significantly change between the two approaches thus showing that the patient specific approach to identifying the driver function is valid, and has potential clinically. [less ▲]

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See detailProcessing aortic and pulmonary artery waveforms to derive the ventricle time-varying elastance
Stevenson, D; Chase, JG; Hann, CE et al

in Proceedings of the 18th IFAC World Congress, 2011 (2011)

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See detailProcessing aortic and pulmonary artery waveforms to derive the ventricle time-varying elastance
Stevenson, D. J.; Hann, C. E.; Chase, G. J. et al

in IFAC Proceedings Volumes (IFAC-PapersOnline) (2011), 18(PART 1), 587-592

Time-varying elastance of the ventricles is an important metric both clinically and as an input for a previously developed cardiovascular model. However, currently time-varying elastance is not normally ... [more ▼]

Time-varying elastance of the ventricles is an important metric both clinically and as an input for a previously developed cardiovascular model. However, currently time-varying elastance is not normally available in an Intensive Care Unit (ICU) setting, as it is an invasive and ethically challenging metric to measure. A previous paper developed a method to map less invasive metrics to the driver function, enabling an estimate to be achieved without invasive measurements. This method requires reliable and accurate processing of the aortic and pulmonary artery pressure waveforms to locate the specific points that are required to estimate the driver function. This paper details the method by which these waveforms are processed, using a data set of five pigs induced with pulmonary embolism, and five pigs induced with septic shock (with haemofiltration), adding up to 88 waveforms (for each of aortic and pulmonary artery pressure), and 616 points in total to locate. 98.2% of all points were located to within 1% of their true value, 0.81% were between 1% and 5%, 0.65% were between 5% and 10%, the remaining 0.32% were below 20%.© 2011 IFAC. [less ▲]

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See detailPatient specific modelling of cardiac muscle activation
Stevenson, D; Hann, CE; Revie, JA et al

in Proceedings of the Health Research Society of Canterbury (HRSC) Clinical Meeting 2010 (2010)

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See detailModel-based cardiac disease diagnosis in critical care
Revie, JA; Hann, CE; Stevenson, D et al

in Proceedings of the Health Research Society of Canterbury (HRSC) Clinical Meeting 2010 (2010)

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See detailEstimating the driver function of a cardiovascular system model
Stevenson, D; Hann, CE; Chase, JG et al

in Proceedings of CONTROL 2010 (2010)

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See detailA Model-based Approach to Cardiovascular Monitoring of Pulmonary Embolism
Revie, JA; Hann, CE; Stevenson, D et al

in Proceedings of CONTROL 2010 (2010)

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See detailPatient-specific modelling of cardiovascular dysfunction: Identifying models of pulmonary embolism in pigs
Desaive, Thomas ULg; Revie, J; Hann, CE et al

in Proceedings of the 19th International Conference of the Cardiovascular System Dynamics Society (2010)

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