References of "Heinesch, Bernard"
     in
Bookmark and Share    
Full Text
See detailImpact of tillage on CO2 and N2O efflux in an agricultural crop
Lognoul, Margaux ULg; Theodorakopoulos, Nicolas ULg; Hiel, Marie-Pierre ULg et al

Poster (2016, April 20)

CO2 and N2O fluxes exchanged by a maize crop were measured from June to Octboer 2015 using a homemade automated system of dynamic closed chambers. We studied the impact of tillage (reduced and ... [more ▼]

CO2 and N2O fluxes exchanged by a maize crop were measured from June to Octboer 2015 using a homemade automated system of dynamic closed chambers. We studied the impact of tillage (reduced and conventional) on greenhouse gas emissions and nitrous oxide flux dynamics. [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 23 (6 ULg)
Full Text
See detailAre BVOC exchanges in agricultural ecosystems overestimated? Insights from fluxes measured in a maize field over a whole growing season
Bachy, Aurélie ULg; Aubinet, Marc ULg; Schoon, Niels et al

Conference (2016, April 18)

This oral communication aims to present the main outputs of the BVOC (Biogenic Volatile Organic Compounds) flux measurement campaign performed on a maize field in Belgium. It begins by highligthing the ... [more ▼]

This oral communication aims to present the main outputs of the BVOC (Biogenic Volatile Organic Compounds) flux measurement campaign performed on a maize field in Belgium. It begins by highligthing the interest of investigating BVOC exchanges on maize; then measurement techniques are briefly presented. The second half of the communication aims to present and discuss the main outputs of this measurement campaign (similar BVOC composition, lower exchange rate than other maize and cropland/grassland studies, significant importance of soil in ecosystem exchanges, strong differences between exchanges rates observed in this study and those used by up-scaling models). [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 8 (2 ULg)
Full Text
See detailCanopy proximity estimation and impact on long term turbulent fluxes above a heterogeneous forest
Hurdebise, Quentin ULg; Vincke, Caroline; De Ligne, Anne ULg et al

Poster (2016, April 18)

With the development of eddy covariance networks like Fluxnet, ICOS or NEON, long-term data series of carbon dioxide, water vapor and other gas exchanges between terrestrial ecosystems and atmosphere will ... [more ▼]

With the development of eddy covariance networks like Fluxnet, ICOS or NEON, long-term data series of carbon dioxide, water vapor and other gas exchanges between terrestrial ecosystems and atmosphere will become more and more numerous. However, long-term analyses of such exchanges require a good understanding of measurement conditions during the investigated period. Independently of climate drivers, measurements may indeed be influenced by measurement conditions themselves subjected to long-term variability due to vegetation growth or set-up changes. The present research refers to the Vielsalm Terrestrial Observatory (VTO) where fluxes of momentum, carbon dioxide, latent and sensible heat have been continuously measured by eddy covariance during twenty years. VTO is an ICOS site installed in a mixed forest (beech, silver fir, Douglas fir, Norway spruce) in the Belgian Ardennes. A multidisciplinary approach was developed in order to investigate the spatial and temporal evolution of several site characteristics: - displacement height (d) and relative measurement height (z-d) were determined using a spectral approach that compared observed and theoretical cospectra; - turbulence statistics were analyzed in the context of Monin-Obukhov similarity theory; - tree height during the measurement period was obtained by combining tree height inventories, a LIDAR survey and tree growth models; - measurement footprint was determined by using a footprint model. A good agreement was found between the three first approaches. Results show notably that z-d was subjected to both temporal and spatial evolution. Temporal evolution resulted from continuous tree growth as well as from a tower raise, achieved in 2009. Spatial evolution, due to canopy heterogeneity, was also observed. The impacts of these changes on measurements are investigated. In particular, it was shown that they affect measurement footprint, flux spectral corrections and flux quality. All these effects must be taken into consideration in order to disentangle long-term flux evolutions due to climate or phenology from changes resulting from measurement set-up changes. [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 15 (1 ULg)
Full Text
Peer Reviewed
See detailImpact of tillage on N2O and CO2 efflux in an agricultural crop
Lognoul, Margaux ULg; Theodorakopoulos, Nicolas ULg; Hiel, Marie-Pierre ULg et al

Poster (2016, April)

In an experiment conducted in the Belgian loess belt between June and October 2015, the effect of two tillage treatments (CT - conventional tillage and RT - reduced tillage) on CO2 and N2O fluxes ... [more ▼]

In an experiment conducted in the Belgian loess belt between June and October 2015, the effect of two tillage treatments (CT - conventional tillage and RT - reduced tillage) on CO2 and N2O fluxes exchanged by a maize crop were compared. Fluxes were measured using two fully automated sets of dynamic closed chambers, allowing a 4.5h temporal resolution. Soil water content and temperature were also monitored as well as pH, total N (TN) and total organic C (TOC) content. [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 50 (6 ULg)
Full Text
See detailLINKING CATTLE GRAZING BEHAVIOR TO METHANE AND CARBON DIOXIDE DYNAMICS
Blaise, Yannick ULg; Lebeau, Frédéric ULg; Andriamandroso, Andriamasinoro ULg et al

in Communications in Agricultural and Applied Biological Sciences (2016, February), 81(1), 107-112

Various methods are presently used to measure methane (CH4) emissions of ruminants on pasture. Those measurements are essential to evaluate nutritional strategies to mitigate enteric CH4 emissions as well ... [more ▼]

Various methods are presently used to measure methane (CH4) emissions of ruminants on pasture. Those measurements are essential to evaluate nutritional strategies to mitigate enteric CH4 emissions as well as addressing the selection of low producing individuals. On pasture and in the barn, variations in CH4 emissions are observed depending on the time of the day. However, no studies have been made to link these diurnal fluctuations to behavioural phases, especially on pasture. The aim of this study was to understand the individual dynamics of CH4 production and their links to the grazing behaviour. For this purpose, a new tool was specifically developed. Five red-pied dry cows were equipped with infrared CH4 and carbon dioxide (CO2) sensors measuring concentrations in the exhaled air at 4 Hz. The animals were equipped with a heart rate belt (HR) and motion sensors to detect their feeding behaviours (grazing vs. rumination) for periods of 8 h/d. Wind speed (WS) was also monitor to verify interference with sampled gas concentrations. Results showed that using the CH4:CO2 ratio reduced the interference with WS that was observed on raw CH4 and CO2 concentration signals. CH4:CO2 ratio average over 5 min periods indicated that CH4 emissions were lower during grazing than rumination (P<0.01). The eructation frequency during grazing (0.48 eructation/min, P<0.01) was also lower than during rumination (0.65 eructation/min). HR was higher during grazing that rumination. Because HR is usually linked to metabolic CO2 production intensity, hence influencing the denominator of the CH4:CO2 ratio, further investigation should focus on the quantification of changes in fermentative and metabolic CO2 emissions along the day to estimate total CH4 production more accurately and the relationship between CH4 emissions patterns and post-feeding times. [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 114 (22 ULg)
Full Text
See detailOUTDOOR MEASUREMENT OF CATTLE METHANE EMISSIONS USING THE EDDY-COVARIANCE TECHNIQUE IN COMBINATION WITH GEOLOCALIZATION DEVICES
Dumortier, Pierre ULg; Andriamandroso, Andriamasinoro ULg; Aubinet, Marc ULg et al

Poster (2016, February)

Methane emissions account for 8% of the EU-15 GHG emissions and livestock generates approximately half of these emissions [1]. In order to improve emissions reporting and properly test mitigation options ... [more ▼]

Methane emissions account for 8% of the EU-15 GHG emissions and livestock generates approximately half of these emissions [1]. In order to improve emissions reporting and properly test mitigation options, techniques for measuring methane emissions from cattle must be developed and adapted to each management system. Among available micrometeorological methods, the use of eddy-covariance is still in its infancy [2] and its relevance and robustness for cattle flux estimation has still to be proved. On one hand, it is well adapted to seasonal grazing systems, is non-invasive, needs little animal handling and allows detection of daily emission patterns. On the other hand, it has the drawback of requiring cattle geo-localization and long periods of measurements (typically one month). In this study, we combined measured CH4 fluxes with a footprint model [3] and cattle positions (GPS devices) over several one-month campaigns at key periods in the grazing season in order to obtain CH4 emissions per cow at herd scale. Accelerometers were also added to the system for behaviour detection, opening the possibility of linking emissions to feeding behaviour. Measurements were performed and are still ongoing at the Dorinne Terrestrial Observatory in 2014/2015. The first campaign provided a mean emission per cow of 65±6 kg CH4.LSU-1.year-1. Cattle emission pattern was tightly linked with behaviour pattern, emissions being higher during and shortly after grazing (i.e. at dawn and dusk). Uncertainties linked to the method will be discussed and quantified (footprint model validity, geo-localization precision, eddy covariance corrections and filtering specificities linked to CH4 measurements). Compilation of data from multiple campaigns will allow quantification of the effects of forage quality, animal weight and lactating state on emissions per cow. [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 34 (6 ULg)
Full Text
See detailPhénologie des hêtres dans une forêt ardennaise: comparaison de méthodes de suivi et relations avec les flux de CO2
Hurdebise, Quentin ULg; Vincke, Caroline; De Ligne, Anne ULg et al

Poster (2015, November 18)

Bien caractériser la phénologie des essences forestières dans un contexte climatique changeant est indispensable. Dans cette optique, confronter les différentes sources d’informations phénologiques ... [more ▼]

Bien caractériser la phénologie des essences forestières dans un contexte climatique changeant est indispensable. Dans cette optique, confronter les différentes sources d’informations phénologiques (relevé de terrain, modélisation, capteurs de rayonnement, caméra phénologique, satellite, eddy covariance…) est une démarche essentielle. Les différences et la complémentarité de ces sources d’informations ont été mises en évidence en utilisant les données provenant d’une forêt mixte de l’Est de la Belgique, principalement composée de hêtres. Par ailleurs, ces informations ont été utilisées pour étudier l’influence de la phénologie des hêtres sur les échanges annuels de CO2 de ces derniers. [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 27 (5 ULg)
Full Text
Peer Reviewed
See detailInterpreting canopy development and physiology using a European phenology camera network at flux sites
Wingate, L.; Ogée, J.; Cremonese, E. et al

in Biogeosciences (2015), 12(10), 5995-6015

Plant phenological development is orchestrated through subtle changes in photoperiod, temperature, soil moisture and nutrient availability. Presently, the exact timing of plant development stages and ... [more ▼]

Plant phenological development is orchestrated through subtle changes in photoperiod, temperature, soil moisture and nutrient availability. Presently, the exact timing of plant development stages and their response to climate and management practices are crudely represented in land surface models. As visual observations of phenology are laborious, there is a need to supplement long-term observations with automated techniques such as those provided by digital repeat photography at high temporal and spatial resolution. We present the first synthesis from a growing observational network of digital cameras installed on towers across Europe above deciduous and evergreen forests, grasslands and croplands, where vegetation and atmosphere CO2 fluxes are measured continuously. Using colour indices from digital images and using piecewise regression analysis of time series, we explored whether key changes in canopy phenology could be detected automatically across different land use types in the network. The piecewise regression approach could capture the start and end of the growing season, in addition to identifying striking changes in colour signals caused by flowering and management practices such as mowing. Exploring the dates of green-up and senescence of deciduous forests extracted by the piecewise regression approach against dates estimated from visual observations, we found that these phenological events could be detected adequately (RMSE < 8 and 11 days for leaf out and leaf fall, respectively). We also investigated whether the seasonal patterns of red, green and blue colour fractions derived from digital images could be modelled mechanistically using the PROSAIL model parameterised with information of seasonal changes in canopy leaf area and leaf chlorophyll and carotenoid concentrations. From a model sensitivity analysis we found that variations in colour fractions, and in particular the late spring `green hump' observed repeatedly in deciduous broadleaf canopies across the network, are essentially dominated by changes in the respective pigment concentrations. Using the model we were able to explain why this spring maximum in green signal is often observed out of phase with the maximum period of canopy photosynthesis in ecosystems across Europe. Coupling such quasi-continuous digital records of canopy colours with co-located CO2 flux measurements will improve our understanding of how changes in growing season length are likely to shape the capacity of European ecosystems to sequester CO2 in the future. [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 32 (6 ULg)
Full Text
See detailSetting up an eddy covariance system to measure N2O fluxes exchanged by a production crop - First steps
Lognoul, Margaux ULg; SALERNO, Giovanni ULg; Debacq, Alain ULg et al

Poster (2015, October 20)

In order to study N2O exchanges by a Belgian production crop, we installed an eddy covariance system at the Terrestrial Observatory of Lonzée (Belgium), using a H2O and N2O quantum cascade laser analyzer ... [more ▼]

In order to study N2O exchanges by a Belgian production crop, we installed an eddy covariance system at the Terrestrial Observatory of Lonzée (Belgium), using a H2O and N2O quantum cascade laser analyzer and a sonic anemometer. We obtained three days of measurements and were able to investigate data preprocessing and flux calculation. We observed a drifting time-lag between the analyzer and the anemometers time series, presumably caused by an internal clock drift. Time-lag determination (using the covariance function maximum method) was more difficult for N2O than H2O, suggesting that this routine should be adapted to gas characterized by low fluxes. We investigated high frequency loss and found a system cut-off frequency of 0.5Hz for H2O, comparing its cospectrum to sensible heat cospectrum. We were not able to retrieve a neat cospectrum for N2O because of low fluxes during turbulent conditions. Further work and more data will be needed in order to bring answers to pending questions. [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 22 (3 ULg)
See detailAir-sea ice gases exchange: update of recent findings, outcomes from sea ice models, caveats and open questions
Delille, Bruno ULg; Zhou, Jiayun; Kotovitch, Marie ULg et al

Conference (2015, September 21)

There are growing evidences that sea ice exchanges climate gases with the atmosphere. We will rapidly present a state of the art of current large scale assessment of spring and summer uptake of ... [more ▼]

There are growing evidences that sea ice exchanges climate gases with the atmosphere. We will rapidly present a state of the art of current large scale assessment of spring and summer uptake of atmospheric CO2. We will challenge these assessments with 1) new evidence of significant winter CO2 release for winter experiments 2) new finding of the role of bubbles formation and transport within sea ice and 3) impurities expulsion derived from combined artificial ice experiment and modelling. Finally, comparison of air-ice fluxes derived from automated chamber and micrometeorological method and, mechanistic and box models show significant discrepancies that suggest that the contribution of sea ice to the air-ocean fluxes of CO2 remain an open question. We will also highlight that sea ice contribute to the fluxes of other gases as CH4 ,N2O and DMS [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 25 (4 ULg)
Full Text
See detailYear Round Survey of Ocean-Sea Ice-Air Exchanges – the YROSIAE survey
Delille, Bruno ULg; Van Der Linden, Fanny ULg; Fripiat, François et al

Poster (2015, September 08)

YROSIAE survey aimed to carry out a year-round integrated survey of land-fast sea ice focusing on the study of sea ice physics and biogeochemistry in order to a) better understand and budget exchanges of ... [more ▼]

YROSIAE survey aimed to carry out a year-round integrated survey of land-fast sea ice focusing on the study of sea ice physics and biogeochemistry in order to a) better understand and budget exchanges of energy and matter across the ocean-sea ice-atmosphere interfaces during sea ice growth and decay and b) quantify their potential impact on fluxes of climate gases (CO2, DMS, CH4, N2O) to the atmosphere and on carbon and macro- nutrients and micro-nutrients export to the ocean. We will present the aims, overall approach and integrated sampling strategy of the YROSIAE survey. We will also discuss CO2 and N2O dynamics within sea ice. It appears that sea ice acts as a source of CO2 for the atmosphere in winter, counterbalancing spring sink. In addition, mineralization in spring appears to alleviate spring CO2 uptake. Intense nitrification in sea ice in spring fosters emission of N2O at the air-ice interface. [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 24 (3 ULg)
Full Text
Peer Reviewed
See detailAn ecosystem-scale perspective of the net land methanol flux: synthesis of micrometeorological flux measurements
Wohlfahrt, G.; Amelynck, C.; Ammann, C. et al

in Atmospheric Chemistry and Physics (2015), (15), 7413-7427

Methanol is the second most abundant volatile organic compound in the troposphere and plays a significant role in atmospheric chemistry. While there is consensus about the dominant role of living plants ... [more ▼]

Methanol is the second most abundant volatile organic compound in the troposphere and plays a significant role in atmospheric chemistry. While there is consensus about the dominant role of living plants as the major source and the reaction with OH as the major sink of methanol, global methanol budgets diverge considerably in terms of source/sink estimates, reflecting uncertainties in the approaches used to model and the empirical data used to separately constrain these terms. Here we compiled micrometeorological methanol flux data from eight different study sites and reviewed the corresponding literature in order to provide a first cross-site synthesis of the terrestrial ecosystem-scale methanol exchange and present an independent data-driven view of the land–atmosphere methanol exchange. Our study shows that the controls of plant growth on production, and thus the methanol emission magnitude, as well as stomatal conductance on the hourly methanol emission variability, established at the leaf level, hold across sites at the ecosystem level. Unequivocal evidence for bi-directional methanol exchange at the ecosystem scale is presented. Deposition, which at some sites even exceeds methanol emissions, represents an emerging feature of ecosystem-scale measurements and is likely related to environmental factors favouring the formation of surface wetness. Methanol may adsorb to or dissolve in this surface water and eventually be chemically or biologically removed from it. Management activities in agriculture and forestry are shown to increase local methanol emission by orders of magnitude; however, they are neglected at present in global budgets. While contemporary net land methanol budgets are overall consistent with the grand mean of the micrometeorological methanol flux measurements, we caution that the present approach of simulating methanol emission and deposition separately is prone to opposing systematic errors and does not allow for full advantage to be taken of the rich information content of micrometeorological flux measurements. [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 16 (3 ULg)
Full Text
See detailCritical periods and critical values explaining fluxes inter-annual variability in a temperate mixed forest
Hurdebise, Quentin ULg; Vincke, Caroline; De Ligne, Anne ULg et al

Poster (2015, June 04)

In order to explain inter-annual variability of Net Ecosystem CO2 Exchange (NEE) above a mixed temperate forest, two approaches were followed: •Detection of critical periods using the R-squared of the ... [more ▼]

In order to explain inter-annual variability of Net Ecosystem CO2 Exchange (NEE) above a mixed temperate forest, two approaches were followed: •Detection of critical periods using the R-squared of the regression between annual NEE and cumulated NEE on a mobile window. •Identification of critical values of a threshold used to decompose annual and seasonal NEE in two components. [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 41 (6 ULg)
Full Text
See detailThe CROSTVOC project – an integrated approach to study the effect of stress on BVOC exchange between agricultural crops and grassland ecosystems and the atmosphere
Amelynck, Crist; Heinesch, Bernard ULg; Aubinet, Marc ULg et al

in Geophysical Research Abstracts (2015, April), 17

Global changes in atmospheric composition and climate are expected to affect BVOC exchange between terrestrial vegetation and the atmosphere through changes in the drivers of constitutive BVOC emissions ... [more ▼]

Global changes in atmospheric composition and climate are expected to affect BVOC exchange between terrestrial vegetation and the atmosphere through changes in the drivers of constitutive BVOC emissions and by increases in frequency and intensity of biotic or abiotic stress episodes. Indeed, several studies indicate changes in the emission patterns of constitutive BVOCs and emission of stress-induced BVOCs following heat, drought and oxidative stress, amongst others. Relating changes in BVOC emissions to the occurrence of one or multiple stressors in natural environmental conditions is not straightforward and only few field studies have dealt with it, especially for agricultural crop and grassland ecosystems. The CROSTVOC project aims to contribute in filling this knowledge gap in three ways. Firstly, it aims at performing long-term BVOC emission field measurements from maize (Zea mays L.) and wheat (Triticum aestivum L.), two important crop species on the global scale, and from grassland. This should lead to a better characterization of (mainly oxygenated) BVOC emissions from these understudied ecosystems, allowing a better representation of those emissions in air quality and atmospheric chemistry and transport models. BVOC fluxes are obtained by the Disjunct Eddy Covariance by mass scanning (DEC-MS) technique, using a hs-PTR-MS instrument for BVOC analysis. Secondly, the eddy covariance BVOC flux measurements (especially at the grassland site) will be accompanied by ozone flux, chlorophyll fluorescence, photosynthesis and soil moisture measurements, amongst others, to allow linking alterations in BVOC emissions to stress episodes. Simultaneously, automated dynamic enclosures will be deployed in order to detect specific abiotic and biotic stress markers by PTR-MS and identify them unambiguously by GC-MS. Thirdly, the field measurements will be accompanied by laboratory BVOC flux measurements in an environmental chamber in order to better disentangle the responses of the BVOC emissions to driving factors that co-occur in field conditions and to determine the influence of single abiotic stressors on BVOC emissions. Next to a general presentation, some preliminary results of the project will be shown. [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 129 (14 ULg)
Full Text
See detailImproving energy partitioning and the nighttime energy balance by implementation of a multi-layer energy budget in ORCHIDEE-CAN
Chen, Yiying; Ryder, James; Naudts, Kim et al

in Geophysical Research Abstracts (2015, April), 17

Canopy structure is one of the most important vegetation characteristics for land-atmosphere interactions as it determines the energy and scalar exchanges between land surface and overlay air mass. In ... [more ▼]

Canopy structure is one of the most important vegetation characteristics for land-atmosphere interactions as it determines the energy and scalar exchanges between land surface and overlay air mass. In this study we evaluated the performance of a newly developed multi-layer energy budget (Ryder et al., 2014) in a land surface model, ORCHIDEE-CAN (Naudts et al., 2014), which simulates canopy structure and can be coupled to an atmospheric model using an implicit procedure. Furthermore, a vertical discrete drag parametrization scheme was also incorporated into this model, in order to obtain a better description of the sub-canopy wind profile simulation. Site level datasets, including the top-of-the-canopy and sub-canopy observations made available from eight flux observation sites, were collected in order to conduct this evaluation. The geo-location of the collected observation sites crossed climate zones from temperate to boreal and the vegetation types included deciduous, evergreen broad leaved and evergreen needle leaved forest with maximum LAI ranging from 2.1 to 7.0. First, we used long-term top-of-the-canopy measurements to analyze the performance of the current one-layer energy budget in ORCHIDEE-CAN. Three major processes were identified for improvement through the implementation of a multi-layer energy budget: 1) night time radiation balance, 2) energy partitioning during winter and 3) prediction of the ground heat flux. Short-term sub-canopy observations were used to calibrate the parameters in sub-canopy radiation, turbulence and resistances modules with an automatic tuning process following the maximum gradient of the user-defined objective function. The multi-layer model is able to capture the dynamic of sub-canopy turbulence, temperature and energy fluxes with imposed LAI profile and optimized parameter set at a site level calibration. The simulation result shows the improvement both on the nighttime energy balance and energy partitioning during winter and presents a better Taylor skill score, compared to the result from single layer simulation. The importance of using the multi-layer energy budget in a land surface model for coupling to the atmospheric model will also be discussed in this presentation. [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 90 (3 ULg)
Full Text
See detailModelling carbon fluxes of forest and grassland ecosystems in Western Europe using the CARAIB dynamic vegetation model: evaluation against eddy covariance data.
Henrot, Alexandra-Jane ULg; François, Louis ULg; Dury, Marie ULg et al

in Geophysical Research Abstracts (2015, April), 17

Eddy covariance measurements are an essential resource to understand how ecosystem carbon fluxes react in response to climate change, and to help to evaluate and validate the performance of land surface ... [more ▼]

Eddy covariance measurements are an essential resource to understand how ecosystem carbon fluxes react in response to climate change, and to help to evaluate and validate the performance of land surface and vegetation models at regional and global scale. In the framework of the MASC project (« Modelling and Assessing Surface Change impacts on Belgian and Western European climate »), vegetation dynamics and carbon fluxes of forest and grassland ecosystems simulated by the CARAIB dynamic vegetation model (Dury et al., iForest - Biogeosciences and Forestry, 4:82-99, 2011) are evaluated and validated by comparison of the model predictions with eddy covariance data. Here carbon fluxes (e.g. net ecosystem exchange (NEE), gross primary productivity (GPP), and ecosystem respiration (RECO)) and evapotranspiration (ET) simulated with the CARAIB model are compared with the fluxes measured at several eddy covariance flux tower sites in Belgium and Western Europe, chosen from the FLUXNET global network (http://fluxnet.ornl.gov/). CARAIB is forced either with surface atmospheric variables derived from the global CRU climatology, or with in situ meteorological data. Several tree (e.g. Pinus sylvestris, Fagus sylvatica, Picea abies) and grass species (e.g. Poaceae, Asteraceae) are simulated, depending on the species encountered on the studied sites. The aim of our work is to assess the model ability to reproduce the daily, seasonal and interannual variablility of carbon fluxes and the carbon dynamics of forest and grassland ecosystems in Belgium and Western Europe. [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 114 (21 ULg)
Full Text
See detailBiogenic Volatile Organic Compound (BVOC) emissions from agricultural crop species: is guttation a possible source for methanol emissions following light/dark transition?
Mozaffar, Ahsan ULg; Amelynck, Crist; Bachy, Aurélie ULg et al

in Geophysical Research Abstracts (2015, April), 17(EGU2015-2110-1),

In the framework of the CROSTVOC (CROp STress VOC) project, the exchange of biogenic volatile organic compounds (BVOCs) between two important agricultural crop species, maize and winter wheat, and the ... [more ▼]

In the framework of the CROSTVOC (CROp STress VOC) project, the exchange of biogenic volatile organic compounds (BVOCs) between two important agricultural crop species, maize and winter wheat, and the atmosphere has recently been measured during an entire growing season by using the eddy covariance technique. Because of the co-variation of BVOC emission drivers in field conditions, laboratory studies were initiated in an environmental chamber in order to disentangle the responses of the emissions to variations of the individual environmental parameters (such as PPFD and temperature) and to diverse abiotic stress factors. Young plants were enclosed in transparent all-Teflon dynamic enclosures (cuvettes) through which BVOC-free and RH-controlled air was sent. BVOC enriched air was subsequently sampled from the plant cuvettes and an empty cuvette (background) and analyzed for BVOCs in a high sensitivity Proton-Transfer Reaction Mass Spectrometer (hs-PTR-MS) and for CO2 in a LI-7000 non-dispersive IR gas analyzer. Emissions were monitored at constant temperature (25 °C) and at a stepwise varying PPFD pattern (0-650 µmol m-2 s-1). For maize plants, sudden light/dark transitions at the end of the photoperiod were accompanied by prompt and considerable increases in methanol (m/z 33) and water vapor (m/z 39) emissions. Moreover, guttation droplets appeared on the sides and the tips of the leaves within a few minutes after light/dark transition. Therefore the assumption has been raised that methanol is also coming out with guttation fluid from the leaves. Consequently, guttation fluid was collected from young maize and wheat plants, injected in an empty enclosure and sampled by PTR-MS. Methanol and a large number of other compounds were observed from guttation fluid. Recent studies have shown that guttation from agricultural crops frequently occurs in field conditions. Further research is required to find out the source strength of methanol emissions by this guttation phenomenon in real environmental conditions. [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 102 (10 ULg)
See detailHow snow affects air-sea ice CO2 fluxes ?
Delille, Bruno ULg; Kotovitch, Marie ULg; Van Der Linden, Fanny ULg et al

Poster (2015, March)

Detailed reference viewed: 26 (7 ULg)