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See detailKepler observations of the variability in B-type stars
Balona, L. A.; Pigulski, A.; Cat, P De et al

in Monthly Notices of the Royal Astronomical Society (2011), 413

The analysis of the light curves of 48 B-type stars observed by Kepler is presented. Among these are 15 pulsating stars, all of which show low frequencies, characteristic of slowly pulsating B (SPB) stars ... [more ▼]

The analysis of the light curves of 48 B-type stars observed by Kepler is presented. Among these are 15 pulsating stars, all of which show low frequencies, characteristic of slowly pulsating B (SPB) stars. Seven of these stars also show a few weak, isolated high frequencies and they could be considered as SPB/β Cephei (β Cep) hybrids. In all cases, the frequency spectra are quite different from what is seen from ground-based observations. We suggest that this is because most of the low frequencies are modes of high degree which are predicted to be unstable in models of mid-B stars. We find that there are non-pulsating stars within the β Cep and SPB instability strips. Apart from the pulsating stars, we can identify stars with frequency groupings similar to what is seen in Be stars but which are not Be stars. The origin of the groupings is not clear, but may be related to rotation. We find periodic variations in other stars which we attribute to proximity effects in binary systems or possibly rotational modulation. We find no evidence for pulsating stars between the cool edge of the SPB and the hot edge of the δ Sct instability strips. None of the stars shows the broad features which can be attributed to stochastically excited modes as recently proposed. Among our sample of B stars are two chemically peculiar stars, one of which is a HgMn star showing rotational modulation in the light curve. [less ▲]

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See detailKepler observations of the beaming binary KPD 1946+4340
Bloemen, S.; Marsh, T. R.; Ostensen, R. H. et al

in Monthly Notices of the Royal Astronomical Society (2011), 410

The Kepler Mission has acquired 33.5 d of continuous 1-min photometry of KPD 1946+4340, a short-period binary system that consists of a subdwarf B star (sdB) and a white dwarf. In the light curve ... [more ▼]

The Kepler Mission has acquired 33.5 d of continuous 1-min photometry of KPD 1946+4340, a short-period binary system that consists of a subdwarf B star (sdB) and a white dwarf. In the light curve, eclipses are clearly seen, with the deepest occurring when the compact white dwarf crosses the disc of the sdB (0.4 per cent) and the more shallow ones (0.1 per cent) when the sdB eclipses the white dwarf. As expected, the sdB is deformed by the gravitational field of the white dwarf, which produces an ellipsoidal modulation of the light curve. Spectacularly, a very strong Doppler beaming (also known as Doppler boosting) effect is also clearly evident at the 0.1 per cent level. This originates from the sdB's orbital velocity, which we measure to be 164.0 ± 1.9 km s-1 from supporting spectroscopy. We present light-curve models that account for all these effects, as well as gravitational lensing, which decreases the apparent radius of the white dwarf by about 6 per cent, when it eclipses the sdB. We derive system parameters and uncertainties from the light curve using Markov chain Monte Carlo simulations. Adopting a theoretical white dwarf mass-radius relation, the mass of the subdwarf is found to be 0.47 ± 0.03 Msun and the mass of the white dwarf 0.59 ± 0.02 Msun. The effective temperature of the white dwarf is 15 900 ± 300 K. With a spectroscopic effective temperature of Teff= 34 730 ± 250 K and a surface gravity of log g= 5.43 ± 0.04, the subdwarf has most likely exhausted its core helium, and is in a shell He burning stage. The detection of Doppler beaming in Kepler light curves potentially allows one to measure radial velocities without the need of spectroscopic data. For the first time, a photometrically observed Doppler beaming amplitude is compared to a spectroscopically established value. The sdB's radial velocity amplitude derived from the photometry (168 ± 4 km s-1) is in perfect agreement with the spectroscopic value. After subtracting our best model for the orbital effects, we searched the residuals for stellar oscillations but did not find any significant pulsation frequencies. [less ▲]

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See detailFirst Kepler results on compact pulsators - I. Survey target selection and the first pulsators
Ostensen, R. H.; Silvotti, R.; Charpinet, S. et al

in Monthly Notices of the Royal Astronomical Society (2010), 409

We present results from the first two quarters of a survey to search for pulsations in compact stellar objects with the Kepler spacecraft. The survey sample and the various methods applied in its ... [more ▼]

We present results from the first two quarters of a survey to search for pulsations in compact stellar objects with the Kepler spacecraft. The survey sample and the various methods applied in its compilation are described, and spectroscopic observations are presented to separate the objects into accurate classes. From the Kepler photometry we clearly identify nine compact pulsators and a number of interesting binary stars. Of the pulsators, one shows the strong, rapid pulsations typical of a V361 Hya-type sdB variable (sdBV); seven show long-period pulsation characteristics of V1093 Her-type sdBVs; and one shows low-amplitude pulsations with both short and long periods. We derive effective temperatures and surface gravities for all the subdwarf B stars in the sample and demonstrate that below the boundary region where hybrid sdB pulsators are found, all our targets are pulsating. For the stars hotter than this boundary temperature a low fraction of strong pulsators (<10 per cent) is confirmed. Interestingly, the short-period pulsator also shows a low-amplitude mode in the long-period region, and several of the V1093 Her pulsators show low-amplitude modes in the short-period region, indicating that hybrid behaviour may be common in these stars, also outside the boundary temperature region where hybrid pulsators have hitherto been found. [less ▲]

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See detailSynthetic pulsational line profile variations
Oreiro, R.; Telting, J. H.; Østensen, R. H. et al

in Astrophysics & Space Science (2010), 329

We have produced simulated time series of high resolution spectroscopy for sdBs. We present the first results of testing classical mode identification techniques. Here, in particular, we analyse the ... [more ▼]

We have produced simulated time series of high resolution spectroscopy for sdBs. We present the first results of testing classical mode identification techniques. Here, in particular, we analyse the behaviour of individual spectral lines and discuss the results and applicability of the moment method. [less ▲]

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See detailAn estimate of V348 SGR effective temperature
Heber, U.; Heck, A.; Houziaux, Léo ULg et al

in Fourth European IUE Conference (1984, July 01)

The IUE low dispersion spectra of the irregular variable V348 Sgr taken close to maximum light were compared with those of the B-type stars HD 53138 and HD 58350 and with those of the extreme helium stars ... [more ▼]

The IUE low dispersion spectra of the irregular variable V348 Sgr taken close to maximum light were compared with those of the B-type stars HD 53138 and HD 58350 and with those of the extreme helium stars HD 12448 and LS II + 33 deg 005. Energy distribution of V348 Sgr was compared with a theoretical continuous distribution based on UBVRI and uvby photometric measurements close to maximum brightness. Results show that V348 Sgr has a carbon-rich atmosphere and a spectral type between s+B3 and s+B5 in the UV (corresponding to between B3 Ia and B5 Ia in the visible). The object probably belongs to the group of extreme helium stars with an effective temperature of 15,000 to 16,000 K. [less ▲]

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