References of "Harris, Nigel"
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See detailThe influence of specific training on the plyometric profile
Jidovtseff, Boris ULg; Harris, Nigel; Carpent, Nicolas et al

Poster (2016, November 30)

Sprinting, jumping and change of direction involve the stretch-shorten cycle (SSC) and therefore plyometric training is used to improve these factors. It has been demonstrated that the jumping strategy ... [more ▼]

Sprinting, jumping and change of direction involve the stretch-shorten cycle (SSC) and therefore plyometric training is used to improve these factors. It has been demonstrated that the jumping strategy utilized can influence the biomechanical profile of the exercise and subsequent adaptation. For example, in some cases, it is important to jump as high as possible while in other cases it is important to reduce the ground contact time. Our hypothesis is that the choice of plyometric exercise has to be matched to the desired biomechanical adaptation. Hence we investigated the influence of 8 weeks of different programs on the plyometric profile of recreational athletes. In each of five groups, very specific exercises were selected according to the training objective: ground contact time group (CT, n=9); vertical jump height group (JH, n=9); CT and JH combination group (CT-JH, n=11); JH + strength training group (JH-S, n=9); and control group (CO, n=8). The plyometric profile performed prior to and post training included measures of jump height, contact time, stiffness and reactivity at different bounding intensities. The results demonstrated that JH and JH-S programs were more effective for improving jump height performance (+7-9%; p<0.005) compared to insignificant jump height changes in the CT and CO groups. CT-JH was the most effective on the reactivity index (+14%, p<0.005) although significant increases (+8%, p<0.05) were also observed in CT, JH and JH-S groups. CT was the only group to significantly decrease short contact time (-5%, p<0.05). ANOVA analysis revealed significant groups*session effect for jump height (p<0.01) and reactivity (p<0.005) but not for short contact time. The present study confirms that the principle of specificity is fundamental in plyometric training so the exercise selection should be developed cognizant of intended adaptations. Jump height and reactivity appear to be differentially affected by specific training practices. [less ▲]

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See detailINFLUENCE OF JUMPING STRATEGY ON KINETIC PARAMETERS
Jidovtseff, Boris ULg; Quievre, Jacques; Harris Nigel et al

in Journal of sports medicine and physical fitness (2014), 54

Aim: Different jumping strategies can be used during plyometric training. Understanding how manipulating variables such as the counter-movement, flexion amplitude, the drop and the load could influence ... [more ▼]

Aim: Different jumping strategies can be used during plyometric training. Understanding how manipulating variables such as the counter-movement, flexion amplitude, the drop and the load could influence neuromuscular adaptation would be beneficial for coaches and athletes. The purpose of this study was to analyze how these variations in the vertical jump influenced kinematic and kinetic parameters as measured by a force platform. Methods: Ten male subjects performed, eight kinds of vertical jumps on a force platform : (1) squat jump (SJ); (2) shallow counter-movement jump (S-CMJ); (3) natural counter-movement jump (N-CMJ); (4) deep counter-movement jump (D-CMJ); (5) loaded (20kg) counter-movement jump (20-CMJ); (6) shallow drop jump (S-DJ); (7) deep drop jump (D-DJ); (8) six consecutive jump test (6CJ). Customised Labview software was used to calculate time, displacement, velocity, acceleration, force, power, impulse and stiffness. After statistical analysis, jumping variables were grouped to achieve spécific training objectives. Results: The mechanical parameters were largely influenced by the jump strategy, all the deep jumps produced superior jump heights and concentric velocities as compared to the shallow jumps. The exercises associated with greater power outputs were the S-DJ (5386±1095w) and 6CJ (5795±1365w) that involved short impulse durations and very high accelerations. The greatest values of muscle stiffness were not recorded during the highest vertical jumps, meaning that stiffness is not critical for jumping high. Conclusion: This study gives an overview of what is changing when we manipulate jumping variables and instructions given to the athletes. Plyometric exercises should be carefully selected according to the sport and specific individual needs. [less ▲]

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See detail1RM PREDICTION AND LOAD-VELOCITY RELATIONSHIP
Jidovtseff, Boris ULg; Cronin, John; Villaret, Jérémy et al

Poster (2012, October)

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See detail1RM PREDICTION AND LOAD-VELOCITY RELATIONSHIP
Jidovtseff, Boris ULg; Cronin, John; Crielaard, Jean-Michel ULg et al

in Abstract book of 8th International Conference on Strength Training (2012, October)

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See detailMODELING RELATIONSHIPS BETWEEN JUMP HEIGHT, GROUND CONTACT TIME, REACTIVITY AND STIFFNESS
Jidovtseff, Boris ULg; Apolloni, Jérémy; Harris, Nigel et al

in Abstract book of 8th International Conference on Strength Training (2012, October)

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See detail1RM PREDICTION AND LOAD-VELOCITY RELATIONSHIP
Jidovtseff, Boris ULg; Cronin, John; Crielaard, Jean-Michel ULg et al

in Abstract book of 17th ECSS congres (2012, July)

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See detailMechanical comparison of eight vertical jump exercises
Jidovtseff, Boris ULg; Cronin, John; Harris, Nigel et al

in Computer Methods in Biomechanics & Biomedical Engineering (2010, September), 13(S1), 77-78

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See detailUnderstanding position transducer technology for strength and conditioning practitioners
Harris, Nigel; Cronin, John; Taylor, Kristie-Lee et al

in Strength & Conditioning Journal (2010), (34), 66-79

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See detailAcceleration and gravity power: A concept for understanding total power output
Quievre, Jacques; Cronin, John; Harris, Nigel et al

in Computer Methods in Biomechanics & Biomedical Engineering (2010, August), 13(S1), 113-114

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See detailUSING INERTIA MEASUREMENT UNIT (IMU) FOR EXERCISE ANALYSIS
Jidovtseff, Boris ULg; Bruls, Olivier ULg; Tubez, François ULg et al

in 7th International conference on strength training - abstract book (2010)

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See detailRELEVANCE OF ACCELERATION AND GRAVITY POWER PROFILING
Jidovtseff, Boris ULg; Harris, Nigel; Cronin, John et al

Poster (2010)

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