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See detailWarm Spitzer Occultation Photometry of WASP-26b at 3.6{\mu}m and 4.5{\mu}m
Mahtani, D. P.; Maxted, P. F. L.; Anderson, D. R. et al

in Monthly Notices of the Royal Astronomical Society (2013), 432(1), 693-701

We present new warm Spitzer occultation photometry of WASP-26 at 3.6{\mu}m and 4.5{\mu}m along with new transit photometry taken in the g,r and i bands. We report the first detection of the occultation of ... [more ▼]

We present new warm Spitzer occultation photometry of WASP-26 at 3.6{\mu}m and 4.5{\mu}m along with new transit photometry taken in the g,r and i bands. We report the first detection of the occultation of WASP-26b, with occultation depths at 3.6{\mu}m and 4.5{\mu}m of 0.00126 +/- 0.00013 and 0.00149 +/- 0.00016 corresponding to brightness temperatures of 1825+/-80K and 1725+/-89K, respectively. We find that the eccentricity of the orbit is consistent with a circular orbit at the 1{\sigma} level with a 3{\sigma} upper limit of e < 0.04. According to the activity-inversion relation of Knutson et al. (2010), WASP-26b is predicted to host a thermal inversion. The brightness temperatures deduced from the eclipse depths are consistent with an isothermal atmosphere, although it is within the uncertainties that the planet may host a weak thermal inversion. The data are equally well fit by atmospheric models with or without a thermal inversion. We find that variation in activity of solar-like stars does not change enough over the time-scales of months or years to change the interpretation of the Knutson et al. (2010) activity-inversion relation, provided that the measured activity level is averaged over several nights. Further data are required to fully constrain the thermal structure of the atmosphere because the planet lies very close to the boundary between atmospheres with and without a thermal inversion. [less ▲]

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See detailThermal emission at 3.6-8 micron from WASP-19b: a hot Jupiter without a stratosphere orbiting an active star
Anderson, D. R.; Smith, A. M. S.; Madhusudhan, N. et al

in Monthly Notices of the Royal Astronomical Society (2013), 430(4), 3422-3431

We report detection of thermal emission from the exoplanet WASP-19b at 3.6, 4.5, 5.8 and 8.0 μm. We used the InfraRed Array Camera on the Spitzer Space Telescope to observe two occultations of WASP-19b by ... [more ▼]

We report detection of thermal emission from the exoplanet WASP-19b at 3.6, 4.5, 5.8 and 8.0 μm. We used the InfraRed Array Camera on the Spitzer Space Telescope to observe two occultations of WASP-19b by its host star. We combine our new detections with previous measurements of WASP-19b's emission at 1.6 and 2.09 μm to construct a spectral energy distribution of the planet's dayside atmosphere. By comparing this with model-atmosphere spectra, we find that the dayside atmosphere of WASP-19b lacks a strong temperature inversion. As WASP-19 is an active star (log R'HK = -4.50 ± 0.03), this finding supports the hypothesis of Knutson, Howard and Isaacson that inversions are suppressed in hot Jupiters orbiting active stars. The available data are unable to differentiate between a carbon-rich and an oxygen-rich atmosphere. [less ▲]

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See detailSpitzer 3.6 micron and 4.5 micron full-orbit lightcurves of WASP-18
Maxted, P. F. L.; Anderson, D. R.; Doyle, A. P. et al

in Monthly Notices of the Royal Astronomical Society (2013), 428(3), 2645-2660

We present new lightcurves of the massive hot Jupiter system WASP-18 obtained with the Spitzer spacecraft covering the entire orbit at 3.6 micron and 4.5 micron. These lightcurves are used to measure the ... [more ▼]

We present new lightcurves of the massive hot Jupiter system WASP-18 obtained with the Spitzer spacecraft covering the entire orbit at 3.6 micron and 4.5 micron. These lightcurves are used to measure the amplitude, shape and phase of the thermal phase effect for WASP-18b. We find that our results for the thermal phase effect are limited to an accuracy of about 0.01% by systematic noise sources of unknown origin. At this level of accuracy we find that the thermal phase effect has a peak-to-peak amplitude approximately equal to the secondary eclipse depth, has a sinusoidal shape and that the maximum brightness occurs at the same phase as mid-occultation to within about 5 degrees at 3.6 micron and to within about 10 degrees at 4.5 micron. The shape and amplitude of the thermal phase curve imply very low levels of heat redistribution within the atmosphere of the planet. We also perform a separate analysis to determine the system geometry by fitting a lightcurve model to the data covering the occultation and the transit. The secondary eclipse depths we measure at 3.6 micron and 4.5 micron are in good agreement with previous measurements and imply a very low albedo for WASP-18b. The parameters of the system (masses, radii, etc.) derived from our analysis are in also good agreement with those from previous studies, but with improved precision. We use new high-resolution imaging and published limits on the rate of change of the mean radial velocity to check for the presence of any faint companion stars that may affect our results. We find that there is unlikely to be any significant contribution to the flux at Spitzer wavelengths from a stellar companion to WASP-18. We find that there is no evidence for variations in the times of eclipse from a linear ephemeris greater than about 100 seconds over 3 years. [less ▲]

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See detailThermal emission at 4.5 and 8 micron of WASP-17b, an extremely large planet in a slightly eccentric orbit
Anderson, D. R.; Smith, A. M. S.; Lanotte, Audrey ULg et al

in Monthly Notices of the Royal Astronomical Society (2011), 416(3), 2108-2122

We report the detection of thermal emission at 4.5 and 8 micron from the planet WASP-17b. We used Spitzer to measure the system brightness at each wavelength during two occultations of the planet by its ... [more ▼]

We report the detection of thermal emission at 4.5 and 8 micron from the planet WASP-17b. We used Spitzer to measure the system brightness at each wavelength during two occultations of the planet by its host star. By combining the resulting light curves with existing transit light curves and radial velocity measurements in a simultaneous analysis, we find the radius of WASP-17b to be 2.0 Rjup, which is 0.2 Rjup larger than any other known planet and 0.7 Rjup larger than predicted by the standard cooling theory of irradiated gas giant planets. We find the retrograde orbit of WASP-17b to be slightly eccentric, with 0.0012 < e < 0.070 (3 sigma). Such a low eccentricity suggests that, under current models, tidal heating alone could not have bloated the planet to its current size, so the radius of WASP-17b is currently unexplained. From the measured planet-star flux-density ratios we infer 4.5 and 8 micron brightness temperatures of 1881 +/- 50 K and 1580 +/- 150 K, respectively, consistent with a low-albedo planet that efficiently redistributes heat from its day side to its night side. [less ▲]

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See detailDetection of a transit of the super-Earth 55 Cnc e with Warm Spitzer
Demory, B.-O.; Gillon, Michaël ULg; Deming, D. et al

in Astronomy and Astrophysics (2011), 533

We report on the detection of a transit of the super-Earth 55 Cnc e with warm Spitzer in IRAC's 4.5 μm band. Our MCMC analysis includes an extensive modeling of the systematic effects affecting warm ... [more ▼]

We report on the detection of a transit of the super-Earth 55 Cnc e with warm Spitzer in IRAC's 4.5 μm band. Our MCMC analysis includes an extensive modeling of the systematic effects affecting warm Spitzer photometry, and yields a transit depth of 410 ± 63 ppm, which translates to a planetary radius of 2.08+0.16-0.17 R_oplus as measured in IRAC 4.5 μm channel. A planetary mass of 7.81-0.53+0.58 M_oplus is derived from an extensive set of radial-velocity data, yielding a mean planetary density of 4.78-1.20+1.31 g cm-3. Thanks to the brightness of its host star (V = 6, K = 4), 55 Cnc e is a unique target for the thorough characterization of a super-Earth orbiting around a solar-type star. [less ▲]

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See detailThe thermal emission of the young and massive planet CoRoT-2b at 4.5 and 8 μm
Gillon, Michaël ULg; Lanotte, Audrey ULg; Barman, T. et al

in Astronomy and Astrophysics (2010), 511

We report measurements of the thermal emission of the young and massive planet CoRoT-2b at 4.5 and 8 microns with the Spitzer Infrared Array Camera (IRAC). Our measured occultation depths are 0.510 +- 0 ... [more ▼]

We report measurements of the thermal emission of the young and massive planet CoRoT-2b at 4.5 and 8 microns with the Spitzer Infrared Array Camera (IRAC). Our measured occultation depths are 0.510 +- 0.042 % and 0.41 +- 0.11 % at 4.5 and 8 microns, respectively. In addition to the CoRoT optical measurements, these planet/star flux ratios indicate a poor heat distribution to the night side of the planet and are in better agreement with an atmosphere free of temperature inversion layer. Still, the presence of such an inversion is not definitely ruled out by the observations and a larger wavelength coverage is required to remove the current ambiguity. Our global analysis of CoRoT, Spitzer and ground-based data confirms the large mass and size of the planet with slightly revised values (Mp = 3.47 +- 0.22 Mjup, Rp = 1.466 +- 0.044 Rjup). We find a small but significant offset in the timing of the occultation when compared to a purely circular orbital solution, leading to e cos(omega) = -0.00291 +- 0.00063 where e is the orbital eccentricity and omega is the argument of periastron. Constraining the age of the system to be at most of a few hundreds of Myr and assuming that the non-zero orbital eccentricity is not due to a third undetected body, we model the coupled orbital-tidal evolution of the system with various tidal Q values, core sizes and initial orbital parameters. For log(Q_s') = 5 - 6, our modelling is able to explain the large radius of CoRoT-2b if log(Q_p') <= 5.5 through a transient tidal circularization and corresponding planet tidal heating event. Under this model, the planet will reach its Roche limit within 20 Myr at most. [less ▲]

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