References of "Hansez, Isabelle"
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See detailRelationships between employment quality and intention to quit: Focus on PhD candidates as traditional workers
Travaglianti, Fabrice ULiege; Babic, Audrey ULiege; Hansez, Isabelle ULiege

in Studies in Continuing Education (2017)

Current statistics show that the attrition rate among PhD candidates is high (i.e. from 30% to 40% depending on the discipline and the country). This high-attrition rate has an impact on both economic (e ... [more ▼]

Current statistics show that the attrition rate among PhD candidates is high (i.e. from 30% to 40% depending on the discipline and the country). This high-attrition rate has an impact on both economic (e.g. negative impact on the return-on investment in doctoral education) and human levels (e.g. negative consequences on candidates’ self-esteem and well-being). Therefore, it seems important to better understand and to prevent the attrition among PhD candidates. Based on the needs–supplies fit theory, the present research focused on the perception of a fit between several PhD candidates’ work-related needs in terms of employment quality and the characteristics of their job to explain their intention to quit their PhD thesis process. This study was based on 160 Belgian PhD candidates, viewed as traditional workers in the Belgian doctoral system, who were still in their thesis process. Data were collected in one Belgian university. Globally, results shown that only the fit perception between the needs for fairness/recognition from the supervisor and the current job situation was significantly associated with lower intention to quit. Thus, we encourage Universities to develop and boost fairness and recognition from thesis supervisors through notably specific training programmes including supportive and justice-based practices. [less ▲]

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See detailDo Management and Executive Share the same Perception on the critical Issues Facing the Frontline Nursing Staff ?
Nyssen, Anne-Sophie ULiege; GILLET, Aline ULiege; Sougné, Jacques ULiege et al

in International Journal of Healthcare Management (2017)

Changes in managerial practices increasingly distance managers from staff by promoting rotation. It could be thought that this distance changes the perception managers have of work constraints and ... [more ▼]

Changes in managerial practices increasingly distance managers from staff by promoting rotation. It could be thought that this distance changes the perception managers have of work constraints and resources. This study attempts to tackle staff and leadership disparate views on the issues facing front-line nursing staff. We sent an online questionnaire on work constraints and good practices to nursing chiefs from Belgium hospitals and conducted focus groups with their ‘front-line’ nursing staff in order to compare perceptions. 40% of the chief nurses mentioned as a regular problems for their staff: production pressure, working time, doctors–nurses collaboration and managing new staff. Except for the ‘productive pressure’, these issues are rather considered by the staff as occasional problems. Front-line staffs evaluate infrastructure, heat, working positions as more common problems. However, statistical analyses showed one significant difference in perception: management of incidents/accidents. Health care organizations should promote participatory management tools both to diagnose work constraints and to elaborate action priorities in order to guarantee a shared understanding of decisions making between staff and supervisors. [less ▲]

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See detailWork environment and work-to-family conflict: Mediating role of work investment.
Babic, Audrey ULiege; Stinglhamber, Florence; Barbier, Marie ULiege et al

Conference (2017, May)

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See detailPerceived management commitment to safety and safety behaviors: the moderating role of trust and support
Laurent, Julie ULiege; Chmiel, Nik; Hansez, Isabelle ULiege

Conference (2017, May)

Instrumental processes, based on the idea that individual perceptions of safety climate inform behavior outcomes expectancies (Zohar, 2008), and reciprocation processes, based on social exchange theory ... [more ▼]

Instrumental processes, based on the idea that individual perceptions of safety climate inform behavior outcomes expectancies (Zohar, 2008), and reciprocation processes, based on social exchange theory (Blau, 1964), have been identified as important processes to take into account in order to understand safety behaviors (Chmiel & Hansez, 2016). The main aim of this study is to go further in the explanation of the processes linking perceived management commitment to safety (PMCS) to safety behaviors, by testing the moderating role of two variables reflecting the way workers perceive their supervisor: safety specific trust in the supervisor, illustrating instrumental processes and perceived supervisor support (PSS), illustrating reciprocation processes. In two samples, a survey methodology and Latent Moderated Structural (LMS) equation modelling were used to test our hypotheses. Overall, and although results were mixed and discussed, high PMCS, when combined with high trust or high PSS, resulted in safer behaviors. We did not find such significant effects as explaining routine violations. The patterns of results were similar in the two samples. The main limitations are the use of single-source and self-reported data may lead to common-method variance bias and the cross-sectional nature of the study. Future longitudinal research is needed to test causality. An important implication for companies is to be aware of the powerful role played by management: building trusting relationship (by behaving consistently regarding safety) and encouraging managers to show support to their employees in a context where safety is considered as important are keys to potentially achieve safe behaviors. [less ▲]

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See detailWork environment and work-to-family conflict: Mediating role of work investment.
Babic, Audrey ULiege; Stinglhamber, Florence; Barbier, Marie ULiege et al

Poster (2017, April)

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See detailSafety behaviors: the moderating role of trust and support
Laurent, Julie ULiege; Chmiel, Nik; Hansez, Isabelle ULiege

Poster (2017, April)

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See detailWork–Home Interface and Well-Being: A Cross-Lagged Analysis
Babic, Audrey ULiege; Stinglhamber, Florence; Bertrand, Françoise ULiege et al

in Journal of Personnel Psychology (2017), 16

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See detailNeeds-Supplies Fit and Behavioral Outcomes: The Mediating Role of Organizational Identification
Travaglianti, Fabrice ULiege; Babic, Audrey ULiege; Pepermans, Roland et al

in Journal of Management & Organization (2017), 23(5), 709-727

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See detailDeveloping Situational Judgment Tests to Assess Organizational Citizenship Behaviours.
Lothe, Benoit ULiege; Hansez, Isabelle ULiege

Conference (2017)

This study is a first step towards addressing the development of Situational Judgment Tests (SJTs) for the assessment of Organizational Citizenship Behaviours (OCB). Based on relevant best practices and ... [more ▼]

This study is a first step towards addressing the development of Situational Judgment Tests (SJTs) for the assessment of Organizational Citizenship Behaviours (OCB). Based on relevant best practices and recommendations from the literature, two distinct SJTs were specifically developed to comply with OCB assessment. The two SJTs differ with respect to their degree of job specificity. Data were collected through online surveys on two different samples (220 white-collar professionals and 139 university students). Concurrently, OCB were collected using self-reported measurement scales. The findings provide some empirical evidence to support the appropriateness of using SJTs as an alternative means to assessing job applicants’ propensity to exhibit OCB. [less ▲]

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See detailEmployee perspectives on safety citizenship behaviors and safety violations
Chmiel, Nik; Laurent, Julie ULiege; Hansez, Isabelle ULiege

in Safety Science (2017), 93

Two studies investigate whether employees viewing discretionary safety activities as part of their job role (termed safety citizenship role definitions, SCRDs) plays an important part in predicting two ... [more ▼]

Two studies investigate whether employees viewing discretionary safety activities as part of their job role (termed safety citizenship role definitions, SCRDs) plays an important part in predicting two types of safety violation: routine violations conceptualized as related to an individual’s available cognitive energy or ‘effort’; and situational violations, which are those provoked by the organization (Reason, 1990). Study 1 showed SCRDs predicted situational violations only, and partially mediated the relationships between Perceived Management Commitment to Safety (PMCS) and work engagement with situational violations. These findings add to those by Hansez and Chmiel (2010), showing that routine and situational violations have predictors that differ. Study 1 findings also extend research reported by Turner et al. (2005), by showing that the effect of Job Control on SCRDs was mediated by both PMCS and work engagement. In study 2, participation in discretionary safety activities (safety participation) mediated the relationship between SCRDs and situational violations. Similar to study 1 The link between SCRDs and routine violations was non-significant and, strikingly, so was the link between safety participation and routine violations. These results support the view that processes involving SCRDs and safety participation are not cognitive-energetical in nature. In addition, study 2 findings extend previous work by Neal and Griffin (2006) by showing that SCRDs and safety knowledge partially mediated relationships between safety motivation and safety participation, whereas the direct effect of safety motivation on safety participation was non-significant. The results from both studies support the view that SCRDs are important in predicting situational violations. In study 2 SCRDs were shown to partially mediate the relationship between safety motivation and selfreported participation in discretionary safety activities (Safety Participation) which, in turn, related to situational violations. Interestingly there was no significant direct link between SCRDs and situational violations. These findings support the view that the effect of SCRDs on situational violations is fully mediated by participation in discretionary safety activities. [less ▲]

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See detailSanté et sécurité au travail: un modèle intégratif pour prédire les comportements de sécurité.
Laurent, Julie ULiege; Chmiel, Nik; Hansez, Isabelle ULiege

Conference (2016, July 13)

INTRODUCTION. La santé et la sécurité sont deux thématiques qui ont souvent été traitées séparément dans la littérature scientifique. Hansez et Chmiel (2010) ont démontré la pertinence d’utiliser le ... [more ▼]

INTRODUCTION. La santé et la sécurité sont deux thématiques qui ont souvent été traitées séparément dans la littérature scientifique. Hansez et Chmiel (2010) ont démontré la pertinence d’utiliser le modèle ‘demandes-ressources’ (Bakker et Demerouti, 2007) afin d’expliquer les comportements de sécurité au travail. La présente étude propose d’étendre ce modèle en y incluant un processus d’échange social, spécifiquement lié à la sécurité, en plus des processus motivationnel, cognitif-énergétique et instrumental. METHODES. Notre échantillon est composé de 1922 travailleurs d’une entreprise métallurgique belge. Notre modèle théorique a été testé à l’aide de la modélisation par équations structurales, avec le logiciel MPlus. RESULTATS. Le modèle final présente des indices d’adéquation acceptables (²=3346.63, dl=678, RMSEA=.04, CFI=.92, NNFI=.91). Les résultats montrent que les quatre processus psychologiques sont impliqués. Les violations « situationnelles » (i.e. le fait de commettre des infractions qui sont dues à des lacunes de l’organisation et sans lesquelles le travail ne pourrait pas être réalisé) sont expliquées par (1) un processus motivationnel, puisque les ressources encouragent les travailleurs à être stimulés par leur travail, et ainsi à moins commettre ce type d’infractions (2) un processus instrumental, puisque percevoir l’implication de son management dans la sécurité est associé directement à moins de violations situationnelles, et par (3) un processus social, puisque les ressources de travail permettent aux employés de percevoir l’implication de leur management dans la sécurité, et de répondre à cet intérêt en considérant la sécurité comme faisant partie de leur rôle, ce qui les encourage ensuite à participer à des activités volontaires liées à la sécurité. D’autre part, les violations de « routine » (i.e. le fait de « prendre des raccourcis » et de ce fait ne pas respecter les procédures de sécurité) sont expliquées par les mêmes processus d’échange social et motivationnel, mais aussi par un processus cognitif-énergétique, puisque des conditions de travail contraignantes peuvent mener à plus de stress, associé à son tour à plus de violations de routine. DISCUSSION. La principale limitation de cette étude est la nature auto-rapportée des données, pouvant mener à différents biais. Néanmoins, différentes implications pratiques peuvent être mises en évidence. Les entreprises désireuses de réduire les violations des règles de sécurité devraient considérer à la fois les processus spécifiquement liés à la sécurité et des processus psychologiques plus larges. Par exemple, outre l’importance d’améliorer les conditions de travail considérées comme des ressources, il est important de garder à l’esprit que ces ressources déterminent des processus complexes d’échanges sociaux spécifiquement liés à la sécurité, à travers l’influence primordiale du management. [less ▲]

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See detailTests de Jugement Situationnel : retour d’expérience (Symposium)
Lothe, Benoit ULiege; Hansez, Isabelle ULiege

Conference (2016, July 12)

Ce symposium propose un retour d’expérience de trois organisations qui développent et utilisent des Tests de jugement situationnel dans leur processus de sélection du personnel. Une première communication ... [more ▼]

Ce symposium propose un retour d’expérience de trois organisations qui développent et utilisent des Tests de jugement situationnel dans leur processus de sélection du personnel. Une première communication présente un cadre de références théoriques élaboré sur base d’une revue actualisée de la littérature. Trois interventions sont ensuite structurées autour de deux questions : en quoi les TJS constituent-t-ils une opportunité dans la sélection et dans quelle mesure la méthodologie d’élaboration, d’implémentation et de validation est-elle garante de la valeur ajoutée ? Chaque exposé souligne l’importance de croiser les perspectives scientifiques et pratiques. La contribution attendue est de permettre l’échange de pratiques sur base des retours d’expérience et de discuter des implications et synergies pour les praticiens et chercheurs. [less ▲]

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See detailSafety and well-being: an integrated model predicting safety behaviors
Laurent, Julie ULiege; Chmiel, Nik; Hansez, Isabelle ULiege

Conference (2016, April)

Since Hofmann, Jacobs and Landy (1995) emphasized the need to consider the influences of socio-organizational factors on safety, several studies have invoked psychological processes in order to interpret ... [more ▼]

Since Hofmann, Jacobs and Landy (1995) emphasized the need to consider the influences of socio-organizational factors on safety, several studies have invoked psychological processes in order to interpret the relationships they identified between such organizational factors and safety outcomes. However, studies measuring effectively such psychological processes are quite scarce. Four distinct psychological processes have been identified as fundamental to predict safety behaviors: cognitive, motivational, instrumental and social exchange processes. Hansez and Chmiel (2010) have applied the job demands resources model (Bakker & Demerouti, 2007) to the safety domain, identifying 3 different safety specific (instrumental) and non-safety specific (cognitive and motivational) psychological processes explaining safety violations. Our main aim is to integrate the four psychological processes, but also in-role and extra-role safety behaviors to the same model. More specifically, we aim at replicating Hansez and Chmiel’s (2010) results on a different sample and integrating safety-specific social process to the model. 1,922 workers (71% response rate) returned a questionnaire including validated scales measuring job demands (work overload and role ambiguity), job resources (job quality, decision latitude and work support), job strain, job engagement, perceived management commitment to safety, routine and situational violations, safety participation and safety citizenship role definitions (SCRDs). Data were analyzed using structural equation modelling and bootstrapping. Results showed that, as expected, our model followed the same patterns as Hansez and Chmiel’s (2010) model, confirming the importance of cognitive-energetical, motivational and instrumental processes in the prediction of safety violations. Moreover, perceiving management as committed to safety leads workers to define discretionary safety behaviours as part of the job, which is linked to corresponding discretionary behaviours. Participating in such discretionary activities, in turn, leads to (1) lower situational violations, but also to (2) lower routine violations. These results confirm the importance of safety-specific social exchange processes in the prediction of safety violations. Thus, it appears that different processes of reaction to working conditions can impact employee’ safety behaviors. On the one hand, situational violations are impacted by motivational process, as job resources encourage employees to be stimulated by their job, by instrumental process, as perceiving management as committed to safety is directly associated with lower situational violations, and by social process stemming from job resources (i.e. job resources allow employees to perceive their management as committed to safety, and they reciprocate this interest by defining safety as a part of their role, what encourage them to participate to discretionary safety activities). On the other hand, routine violations are impacted by the same social exchange (although to a lesser extent) and motivational processes, but also by cognitive process, as demanding working conditions may provoke job strain, associated with more “corner-cutting”. A practical implication for companies who want to reduce safety violations is to consider safety-specific and non-safety specific processes together. That is, they can try to improve working conditions considered as job resources, but need to keep in mind that these resources determine more complex safety-specific social exchange processes, through the crucial influence of management. [less ▲]

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See detailJugement Situationnel
Lothe, Benoit ULiege; Hansez, Isabelle ULiege

in Brangier, Eric; Dubois, Michel; Valléry, Gérard (Eds.) et al Psychologie du Travail et des Organisations : 110 notions clés (2016)

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See detailThe role of work-related needs in the relationship between job crafting, burnout and work engagement
Travaglianti, Fabrice ULiege; Babic, Audrey ULiege; Hansez, Isabelle ULiege

in Sa Journal of Industrial Psychology (2016), 42(1), 1308

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See detailConditions de travail et effets sur la santé des travailleurs : focus sur la prévention primaire
Hansez, Isabelle ULiege; Mairiaux, Philippe ULiege

in Lamberts, Miets; Szeker, Lise; Vandekerckhove, Sem (Eds.) et al Jobkwaliteit in Belgie in 2015 : Analyse aan de hand van de European Working Conditions Survey EWCS 2015 (Eurofound) (2016)

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See detailMaladies chroniques et absentéisme-maladie : Interactions avec le travail
Mairiaux, Philippe ULiege; Hansez, Isabelle ULiege

in Lamberts, Miet; Szeker, Lise; Vandekerckove, Sem (Eds.) et al Jobkwaliteit in Belgie in 2015 : Analyse aan de hand van de European Working Conditions Survey EWCS 2015 (Eurofound) (2016)

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See detailJobs and safety behavior
Chmiel, nik; Hansez, Isabelle ULiege

in Clarke, S.; Probst, T.M.; Guldenmund, F. (Eds.) et al The Wiley-Blackwell Handbook of the Psychology of Occupational Safety and Workplace Health (2016)

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See detailOutplacement adequacy and benefits: The mediating role of overall justice.
Marzucco, Laurence ULiege; Hansez, Isabelle ULiege

in Journal of Employment Counseling (2016), 53

Despite a rapid growth and an ongoing need for outplacement services, little is yet known about the perceived adequacy and benefits of these services for redundant employees using them. We surveyed 360 ... [more ▼]

Despite a rapid growth and an ongoing need for outplacement services, little is yet known about the perceived adequacy and benefits of these services for redundant employees using them. We surveyed 360 Belgian redundant employees (i.e., clients) using outplacement services provided by a public employment agency. The results indicate that an outplacement experience perceived as adequate for clients fosters their overall impressions of justice towards the dismissing organization; this leads in turn to benefits for them: reduction of negative emotions, enhancement of their perceived well-being, future perspectives, and job-seeking activities - confirming the mediating role of overall justice. [less ▲]

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