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See detailA retrospective study of non-specific rhinitis in 22 cats and the value of nasal cytology and histopathology
Michiels, L.; Day, M. J.; Snaps, Frédéric ULg et al

in Journal of Feline Medicine and Surgery (2003), 5(5), 279-285

Case records from 40 cats subjected to rhinoscopic examination for investigation of chronic nasal disease were reviewed. Cases in which no specific underlying cause (eg neoplasia) was detected were ... [more ▼]

Case records from 40 cats subjected to rhinoscopic examination for investigation of chronic nasal disease were reviewed. Cases in which no specific underlying cause (eg neoplasia) was detected were further selected for detailed retrospective study. In these 22 cats (55% of the initial population), a final diagnosis of non-specific chronic nasal disease was made. The radiographic, rhinoscopic, cytological and histopathological findings were reviewed. Mucosal biopsy specimens were obtained in 20 cases. Despite clinical signs of more than 4 weeks duration, histopathology indicated acute inflammation in four cases. Two cases had chronic lymphoplasmacytic inflammation and 14 had mixed (lymphoplasmacytic and neutrophilic) inflammation. Specimens for cytology were obtained from 17 cases by brush sampling. Three of these samples were not diagnostic due to the poor quality of the slides; one showed normal cytology. Acute inflammation was diagnosed by cytology (n = 11) more commonly than chronic (n = 1) or mixed inflammation (n = 1). Concurrent samples, of quality suitable for both histopathological and cytological interpretation, were collected from 12 cases only. Cytological results were in agreement with the histological results in 25%, of these cases, the main discrepancy being the nature of the dominant inflammatory cell type. Therefore cytology does not appear to be a reliable means for detection of chronic inflammation. Further studies are needed in order to investigate the correlation between the nature of mucosal inflammation as defined by both histological and cytological evaluation, and the relationship of these test results to prognosis and therapy. (C) 2003 Published by Elsevier Ltd on behalf of ESFM and AAFP. [less ▲]

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See detailAn Immunologic investigation of canine eosinophilic bronchopneumopathy.
Clercx, Cécile ULg; Peeters, Dominique ULg; German, Alex et al

in Journal of Veterinary Internal Medicine (2002), 16

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See detailEosinophilic Bronchopneumopathy in Dogs
Clercx, Cécile ULg; Peeters, Dominique ULg; Snaps, Frédéric ULg et al

in Journal of Veterinary Internal Medicine (2000), 14(3, May-Jun), 282-91

Eosinophilic bronchopneumopathy was diagnosed in 23 young dogs. Clinical signs included cough, gagging, and retching in all dogs, dyspnea in 21 dogs (91%), and nasal discharge in 12 dogs (52%). The most ... [more ▼]

Eosinophilic bronchopneumopathy was diagnosed in 23 young dogs. Clinical signs included cough, gagging, and retching in all dogs, dyspnea in 21 dogs (91%), and nasal discharge in 12 dogs (52%). The most common radiographic findings were a moderate to severe bronchointerstitial pattern (68%, 13 of 19 dogs). Bronchoscopic findings included the presence of abundant yellow-green mucus or mucopurulent material (70%, 16 of 23 dogs) and severe mucosal thickening with an irregular or polypoid appearance (52%, 12 of 23 dogs), with partial airway closure during expiration in 3 dogs (13%). Peripheral blood eosinophilia was noted in 14 of 23 dogs (61%). Inflammatory cells in brush or bronchoalveolar lavage fluid cytologic preparations comprised more than 50% eosinophils in 14 of 23 dogs (61%), and 20-50% eosinophils in 6 dogs (26%). Eosinophilic infiltration of the bronchial mucosa was observed in biopsies from 19 dogs and was graded as mild (37%, 7 dogs), moderate (32%, 6 dogs), or severe (32%, 6 dogs). The mean serum immunoglobulin A concentration was almost double that of a population of 20 healthy dogs of various breeds. Oral glucocorticoids were administered on alternate days with progressive tapering of the dose; the dosage at maintenance varied between 0.1 and 1.0 mg/kg every other day. No relationship was found between the duration of clinical signs and the maintenance dosage or the cytologic and histopathologic grades. [less ▲]

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See detailNeutrophil Phagocyte Dysfunction in a Weimaraner with Recurrent Infections
Hansen, P.; Clercx, Cécile ULg; Henroteaux, Marc ULg et al

in Journal of Small Animal Practice (1995), 36(3), 128-31

A five-and-a-half-month-old male weimaraner with severe recurrent bacterial infections was assessed for immunocompetence. Results revealed a low serum immunoglobulin G concentration and defective ... [more ▼]

A five-and-a-half-month-old male weimaraner with severe recurrent bacterial infections was assessed for immunocompetence. Results revealed a low serum immunoglobulin G concentration and defective neutrophil phagocytosis. [less ▲]

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