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See detailEchinococcus Multilocularis in Belgium: Prevalence in Red Foxes (Vulpes Vulpes) and in Different Species of Potential Intermediate Hosts
Hanosset, R.; Saegerman, Claude ULg; Adant, S. et al

in Veterinary Parasitology (2008), 151(2-4), 212-7

Echinococcus multilocularis causes a rare but potentially lethal zoonotic infection in humans. This tapeworm is known to be endemic in foxes in several countries of Western and Central Europe. In Western ... [more ▼]

Echinococcus multilocularis causes a rare but potentially lethal zoonotic infection in humans. This tapeworm is known to be endemic in foxes in several countries of Western and Central Europe. In Western Europe, the common vole (Microtus arvalis) and the water vole (Arvicola terrestris) are considered to be the most important intermediate host species of this cestode whereas the red fox is by far the most important final host. The purpose of this study was to provide data on the prevalences in Wallonia (Southern part of Belgium) both in the red fox and in different potential intermediate hosts. A total of 990 red foxes were examined between January 2003 and December 2004 for the presence of E. multilocularis. The average prevalence was 24.55% (22.38-27.87). Out of 1249 rodents or insectivores belonging to the species Apodemus sylvaticus, Arvicola terrestris, Clethrionomys glareolus, Microtus arvalis, Microtus agrestris and Sorex araneus, only one M. arvalis (out of 914-0.11% (0.003-0.61) and one C. glareolus (out of 23-4.3% (0.1-21.9) were found to be infected. However, the muskrat (Ondatra zibethicus) seems to be a good intermediate host as 11.18% (9.72-12.76) of the animals (n=1718) were found to be infected. A positive correlation was found between the prevalences in foxes and in muskrats in each of the different geological regions. This study indicates that the muskrat is highly sensitive to this zoonotic tapeworm and could perhaps represent a good bioindicator when studying the epidemiology of this parasitic infection in Belgium and in other countries where the muskrat is present. [less ▲]

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See detailEchinococcus multilocularis and Toxocara canis in urban red foxes (Vulpes vulpes) in Brussels, Belgium
Brochier, B.; De Blander, H.; Hanosset, R. et al

in Preventive Veterinary Medicine (2007), 80(1), 65-73

During the last decades, European red foxes (Vulpes vulpes) have been implicated in the transmission of several viral or parasitic pathogenic agents to domestic animals and humans. In urban areas, risks ... [more ▼]

During the last decades, European red foxes (Vulpes vulpes) have been implicated in the transmission of several viral or parasitic pathogenic agents to domestic animals and humans. In urban areas, risks of zoonoses transmission are likely to increase as a result of a higher rate of intra and inter-species contacts. Foxes occur on 35% of the Brussels-Capital Region area and local densities reach up to 4 family groups per square kilometre. According to the directive 2003/99/ECC, a first survey for the presence in foxes of Echinococcus multilocularis and Toxocara canis was conducted in Brussels from 2001 to 2004. None of 160 foxes were found to be infected with E. multilocularis and 24 of 134 foxes were found to be infected with T canis. Considering numbers of examined foxes, the sensitivity and the specificity of tests used for diagnosis, the 95% credibility intervals for the true prevalence of E. multilocularis and T canis were estimated in a Bayesian framework to be 0 to 1.87% (median value of 0%) and 12.7 to 26% (median value of 18.7%), respectively. For T canis, a significantly higher risk to be a carrier occurs in cubs and a significantly lower risk in adults. (c) 2007 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved. [less ▲]

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See detailEvaluation des risques liés à la présence d’Echinococcus multilocularis et de Toxocara canis dans la population vulpine en région bruxelloise
Saegerman, Claude ULg; De Blander, H.; Hanosset, R. et al

in Epidémiologie et Santé Animale (2006), 50

During the last decades, European red foxes (Vulpes vulpes) have been implicated in the transmission of several viral or parasitic pathogenic agents to domestic animals and humans. In urban areas, risks ... [more ▼]

During the last decades, European red foxes (Vulpes vulpes) have been implicated in the transmission of several viral or parasitic pathogenic agents to domestic animals and humans. In urban areas, risks of zoonoses transmission are likely to increase as a result of a higher rate of intra- and inter-species contacts. Foxes occur on 35% of the Brussels-Capital Region area and local densities reach up to 4 family groups per km². According to the directive 2003/99/ECC, a first survey for thepresence in foxes of Echinococcus multilocularis and Toxocara canis was conducted in Brussels from 2001 to 2004. None of 160 foxes were found to be infected with Echinococcus multilocularis and 24 of 134 foxes were found to be infected with Toxocara canis. Considering numbers of examined foxes, the sensitivity and the specificity of tests used for diagnosis, the 95% credibility intervals for the true prevalence of carriage of Echinococcus multilocularis and Toxocara canis were estimated in a Bayesian framework to be 0% to 1.87% (median value of 0%) and 12.7% to 26% (median value of 18.7.%) respectively. For Toxocara canis, a significantly higher risk to be a carrier occurs in cubs and a significantly lower risk in adults. [less ▲]

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See detailDetection of Echinococcus multilocularis in wild boars in France using PCR techniques against larval form
Boucher, J. M.; Hanosset, R.; Augot, D. et al

in Veterinary Parasitology (2005), 129(3-4), 259-266

Recently, new data have been collected on the distribution and ecology of Echinococcus multilocularis in European countries. Different ungulates species such as pig, goat, sheep, cattle and horse are ... [more ▼]

Recently, new data have been collected on the distribution and ecology of Echinococcus multilocularis in European countries. Different ungulates species such as pig, goat, sheep, cattle and horse are known to host incomplete development of larval E. multilocularis. We report a case of E. multilocularis portage in two wild boars from a high endemic area in France (Department of Jura). Histological examination was performed and the DNA was isolated from hepatic lesions then amplified by using three PCR methods in two distinct institutes. Molecular characterisation of PCR products revealed 99% nucleotide sequence homology with the specific sequence of the U1 sn RNA gene of E. multilocularis, 99 and 99.9% nucleotide sequence homology with the specific sequence of the cytochrome oxydase gene of Echinococcus genus and 99.9% nucleotide sequence homology with a genomic DNA sequence of Echinococcus genus for the first and the second wild boar, respectively. (c) 2004 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved. [less ▲]

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See detailEpidémiologie de l'échinococcose alvéolaire en Région wallonne
Hanosset, R.; Mignon, Bernard ULg; Losson, Bertrand ULg

Diverse speeche and writing (2003)

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