References of "Habyarimana, Jean"
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See detailDetection of hypoglycin A in the seeds of sycamore (Acer pseudoplatanus) and box elder (A. negundo) in New Zealand; the toxin associated with cases of equine atypical myopathy.
McKenzie, R. K.; Hill, F. I.; Habyarimana, Jean ULg et al

in New Zealand veterinary journal (2015)

CASE HISTORY AND CLINICAL FINDINGS: During April and May 2014 four horses aged between 5 months and 9 years, located in the Canterbury, Marlborough and Southland regions, presented with a variety of ... [more ▼]

CASE HISTORY AND CLINICAL FINDINGS: During April and May 2014 four horses aged between 5 months and 9 years, located in the Canterbury, Marlborough and Southland regions, presented with a variety of clinical signs including recumbency, stiffness, lethargy, dehydration, depression, and myoglobinuria suggestive of acute muscle damage. Two horses were subjected to euthanasia and two recovered. In all cases seeds of sycamore maple (Acer pseudoplatanus) or box elder (A. negundo) were present in the area where the horse had been grazing. LABORATORY INVESTIGATION: The samaras (seeds) of some Acer spp. may contain hypoglycin A, that has been associated with cases of atypical myopathy in Europe and North America. To determine if hypoglycin A is present in the samaras of Acer spp. in New Zealand, samples were collected from trees throughout the country that were associated with historical and/or current cases of atypical myopathy, and analysed for hypoglycin A. Serum samples from the four cases and four unaffected horses were analysed for the presence of hypoglycin A, profiles of acylcarnitines (the definitive diagnosis for atypical myopathy) and activities of creatine kinase and aspartate aminotransferase. Markedly elevated serum activities of creatine kinase and aspartate aminotransferase, and increased concentrations of selected acylcarnitines were found in the case horses. Hypoglycin A was detected in the serum of those horses but not in the healthy controls. Hypoglycin A was detected in 10/15 samples of samaras from sycamore maple and box elder from throughout New Zealand. DIAGNOSIS: Cases of atypical myopathy were diagnosed on properties where samaras containing hypoglycin A were also found. CLINICAL RELEVANCE: Sycamore and box elder trees in New Zealand are a source of hypoglycin A associated with the development of atypical myopathy. If pastured horses present with clinical and biochemical signs of severe muscle damage then the environment should be checked for the presence of these trees. Horses should be prevented from grazing samaras from Acer spp. in the autumn. [less ▲]

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See detailLes nouveaux outils de diagnostic et de pronostic de la myopathie atypique
Habyarimana, Jean ULg; BOEMER, François ULg; Amory, Hélène ULg et al

in Proceeding de la 41ème Journée de la Recherche équine (2015)

In equines, ingestion of hypoglycin A, a toxin produced in the seeds (samaras) of sycamore maple (Acer pseudoplatanus) tree alters the energetic metabolism of muscle cells and results in atypical myopathy ... [more ▼]

In equines, ingestion of hypoglycin A, a toxin produced in the seeds (samaras) of sycamore maple (Acer pseudoplatanus) tree alters the energetic metabolism of muscle cells and results in atypical myopathy (AM). This alterations leads to a characteristic biochemical profile of acylcarnitines (AC) that enables to confirm the diagnosis of AM. This study aims at validating a methodology for the dosage of hypoglycin A in vegetal extracts but also in blood. In addition, the biochemical profile in AC has been determined in AM cases (5 survivors and 13 deceased) and in 5 horses suffering from exercise-induced myopathy. The AC profiles of these horses have been compared to the one of healthy horses (n = 35). This study showed that hypoglycin A was present in seeds and spring seedlings of sycamore and also in blood of AM cases horses. In addition, the establishment of AC profile contributes to the diagnostic and helps to assess the prognosis of AM cases. [less ▲]

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See detailInfluenza A strain-dependent pathogenesis in fatal H1N1 and H5N1 infections of mice
Garigliany, Mutien-Marie ULg; Habyarimana, Jean ULg; Lambrecht, Bénédicte et al

in Emerging Infectious Diseases (2010), 16(4), 595-603

Two different influenza A viruses showing no pathogenicity towards the laboratory mouse were forced to evolve by serial passaging. Although both adapted viruses evoked diffuse alveolar damage and showed a ... [more ▼]

Two different influenza A viruses showing no pathogenicity towards the laboratory mouse were forced to evolve by serial passaging. Although both adapted viruses evoked diffuse alveolar damage and showed a similar 50% mouse lethal dose and the same peak lung concentration, they elicited dramatically different pathological signatures and ARDS courses. In the absence of any virus labeling, a histologist unaware of which infection he was looking at could readily distinguish infections caused by these two viruses. This suggests that fatal infections caused by different highly virulent influenza A viruses do not necessarily share the same pathogenesis. The different histological pictures shown here refute the hypothesis of a single, universal “cytokine storm” underlying all fatal influenzal diseases. Research is thus crucially needed to identify underlying sets of virulence markers and to examine whether it might be advantageous to tailor treatment to the influenza virus pathotype. [less ▲]

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