References of "Haas, Felix"
     in
Bookmark and Share    
Full Text
Peer Reviewed
See detailDexamethasone pretreatment provides antiinflammatory and myocardial protection in neonatal arterial switch operation.
Heying, Ruth; Wehage, Edith; SCHUMACHER, Katharina ULg et al

in Annals of Thoracic Surgery (2012), 93(3), 869-76

BACKGROUND: This prospective double-blinded randomized study tested the hypothesis that preoperative treatment with dexamethasone would attenuate inflammatory priming of the myocardium, reduce the ... [more ▼]

BACKGROUND: This prospective double-blinded randomized study tested the hypothesis that preoperative treatment with dexamethasone would attenuate inflammatory priming of the myocardium, reduce the systemic inflammatory reaction upon cardiac operation, and provide organ protection in neonates. METHODS: Twenty neonates (age, 8 to 21 days) with transposition of the great arteries scheduled for arterial switch operation were included. Nine received dexamethasone (1 mg/kg body weight) 4 hours before cardiopulmonary bypass, and 11 received natrium chloride. We studied intramyocardial messenger RNA expression of interleukin (IL)-6, IL-8, IL-1beta, and tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-alpha), as well as IL-10 and expression of TNF-alpha on protein level in right atrial tissue taken before institution of CPB. We measured plasma levels of IL-6, IL-10, lipopolysaccharide binding protein, and cardiac troponin T. Cytokine expression was related to postoperative outcome. RESULTS: Pretreatment with dexamethasone led to a significant decrease in myocardial expression of IL-6, IL-8, IL-1beta, and TNF-alpha messenger RNA and to a decrease in protein synthesis of TNF-alpha. Plasma concentrations of IL-6 were significantly lower and those of IL-10 significantly higher in pretreated patients. This was associated with lower cardiac troponin T values and lower dobutamine requirement. Levels of lipopolysaccharide binding protein were significantly higher postoperatively in pretreated neonates. CONCLUSIONS: Dexamethasone administration before arterial switch operation leads to a shift in the myocardial and systemic cytokine expression profile in neonates with transposition of the great arteries, with downregulation of proinflammatory and upregulation of antiinflammatory cytokines. Lower myocardial cell damage and lower catecholamine requirement suggest myocardial protection in treated patients. [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 26 (11 ULg)
Full Text
Peer Reviewed
See detailExtravasation of albumin after cardiopulmonary bypass in newborns.
Tassani, Peter; Schad, Hubert; Schreiber, Christian et al

in Journal of Cardiothoracic and Vascular Anesthesia (2007), 21(2), 174-178

OBJECTIVE: The systemic inflammatory response to cardiopulmonary bypass (CPB) possibly increases microvascular permeability to plasma proteins, leading to capillary leak syndrome. The study was conducted ... [more ▼]

OBJECTIVE: The systemic inflammatory response to cardiopulmonary bypass (CPB) possibly increases microvascular permeability to plasma proteins, leading to capillary leak syndrome. The study was conducted to elucidate any protein leakage in newborns using Evans blue dye as tracer. DESIGN: Prospective controlled study. SETTING: University-affiliated heart center. PARTICIPANTS: Eleven neonates with transposition of the great arteries. INTERVENTIONS: Plasma interleukin-6 (IL-6), IL-10, fractional escape rate (FER) of an intravenous bolus of Evans blue, and colloid osmotic pressure (COP) were assessed before and after surgery (statistics: median and 25th-75th percentile, Friedman's 2-way analysis of variance, and Wilcoxon matched-pairs signed-rank test [before and after surgery]). MEASUREMENTS AND MAIN RESULTS: All patients had an uneventful intraoperative course. The demographic and operative data were age 11 (10-13) days, body weight 3.2 (3.0-3.3) kg, CPB time 132 (123-144) minutes, and aortic cross-clamp time 66 (64-78) minutes. The proinflammatory IL-6 increased 60-fold and the anti-inflammatory IL-10 only 3-fold after CPB. FER, however, was not changed, whereas COP was significantly reduced after CPB. CONCLUSIONS: In contrast to the expectation, the escape rate of Evans blue, reflecting the extravasation of albumin, was not increased after CPB. However, reduced COP, hypothermia, and also a reduced lymphatic drainage may contribute to edema formation. The present data do not support the hypothesis of a capillary leak after CPB in newborns. [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 23 (0 ULg)