References of "Hébrard, G"
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See detailThe PLATO 2.0 Mission
Rauer, H.; Catala, C.; Aerts, C. et al

in Experimental Astronomy (2014)

PLATO 2.0 has recently been selected for ESA’s M3 launch opportunity (2022/24). Providing accurate key planet parameters (radius, mass, density and age) in statistical numbers, it addresses fundamental ... [more ▼]

PLATO 2.0 has recently been selected for ESA’s M3 launch opportunity (2022/24). Providing accurate key planet parameters (radius, mass, density and age) in statistical numbers, it addresses fundamental questions such as: How do planetary systems form and evolve? Are there other systems with planets like ours, including potentially habitable planets? The PLATO 2.0 instrument consists of 34 small aperture telescopes (32 with 25 s readout cadence and 2 with 2.5 s candence) providing a wide field-of-view (2232 deg 2) and a large photometric magnitude range (4–16 mag). It focusses on bright (4–11 mag) stars in wide fields to detect and characterize planets down to Earth-size by photometric transits, whose masses can then be determined by ground-based radial-velocity follow-up measurements. Asteroseismology will be performed for these bright stars to obtain highly accurate stellar parameters, including masses and ages. The combination of bright targets and asteroseismology results in high accuracy for the bulk planet parameters: 2 %, 4–10 % and 10 % for planet radii, masses and ages, respectively. The planned baseline observing strategy includes two long pointings (2–3 years) to detect and bulk characterize planets reaching into the habitable zone (HZ) of solar-like stars and an additional step-and-stare phase to cover in total about 50 % of the sky. PLATO 2.0 will observe up to 1,000,000 stars and detect and characterize hundreds of small planets, and thousands of planets in the Neptune to gas giant regime out to the HZ. It will therefore provide the first large-scale catalogue of bulk characterized planets with accurate radii, masses, mean densities and ages. This catalogue will include terrestrial planets at intermediate orbital distances, where surface temperatures are moderate. Coverage of this parameter range with statistical numbers of bulk characterized planets is unique to PLATO 2.0. The PLATO 2.0 catalogue allows us to e.g.: - complete our knowledge of planet diversity for low-mass objects, - correlate the planet mean density-orbital distance distribution with predictions from planet formation theories,- constrain the influence of planet migration and scattering on the architecture of multiple systems, and - specify how planet and system parameters change with host star characteristics, such as type, metallicity and age. The catalogue will allow us to study planets and planetary systems at different evolutionary phases. It will further provide a census for small, low-mass planets. This will serve to identify objects which retained their primordial hydrogen atmosphere and in general the typical characteristics of planets in such low-mass, low-density range. Planets detected by PLATO 2.0 will orbit bright stars and many of them will be targets for future atmosphere spectroscopy exploring their atmosphere. Furthermore, the mission has the potential to detect exomoons, planetary rings, binary and Trojan planets. The planetary science possible with PLATO 2.0 is complemented by its impact on stellar and galactic science via asteroseismology as well as light curves of all kinds of variable stars, together with observations of stellar clusters of different ages. This will allow us to improve stellar models and study stellar activity. A large number of well-known ages from red giant stars will probe the structure and evolution of our Galaxy. Asteroseismic ages of bright stars for different phases of stellar evolution allow calibrating stellar age-rotation relationships. Together with the results of ESA’s Gaia mission, the results of PLATO 2.0 will provide a huge legacy to planetary, stellar and galactic science. [less ▲]

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See detailWASP-104b and WASP-106b: two transiting hot Jupiters in 1.75-day and 9.3-day orbits
Smith, A. M. S.; Anderson, D. R.; Armstrong, D. J. et al

E-print/Working paper (2014)

We report the discovery from the WASP survey of two exoplanetary systems, each consisting of a Jupiter-sized planet transiting an 11th magnitude (V) main-sequence star. WASP-104b orbits its star in 1.75 d ... [more ▼]

We report the discovery from the WASP survey of two exoplanetary systems, each consisting of a Jupiter-sized planet transiting an 11th magnitude (V) main-sequence star. WASP-104b orbits its star in 1.75 d, whereas WASP-106b has the fourth-longest orbital period of any planet discovered by means of transits observed from the ground, orbiting every 9.29 d. Each planet is more massive than Jupiter (WASP-104b has a mass of 1.27±0.05 MJup, while WASP-106b has a mass of 1.93±0.08 MJup). Both planets are just slightly larger than Jupiter, with radii of 1.14±0.04 and 1.09±0.04 RJup for WASP-104 and WASP-106 respectively. No significant orbital eccentricity is detected in either system, and while this is not surprising in the case of the short-period WASP-104b, it is interesting in the case of WASP-106b, because many otherwise similar planets are known to have eccentric orbits. [less ▲]

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See detailTransiting exoplanets from the CoRoT space mission. XXVI. CoRoT-24: a transiting multiplanet system
Alonso, R.; Moutou, C.; Endl, M. et al

in Astronomy and Astrophysics (2014), 567

We present the discovery of a candidate multiply transiting system, the first one found in the CoRoT mission. Two transit-like features with periods of 5.11 and 11.76 d are detected in the CoRoT light ... [more ▼]

We present the discovery of a candidate multiply transiting system, the first one found in the CoRoT mission. Two transit-like features with periods of 5.11 and 11.76 d are detected in the CoRoT light curve around a main sequence K1V star of r = 15.1. If the features are due to transiting planets around the same star, these would correspond to objects of 3.7 ± 0.4 and 5.0 ± 0.5 R[SUB]⊕[/SUB] , respectively. Several radial velocities serve to provide an upper limit of 5.7 M[SUB]⊕[/SUB] for the 5.11 d signal and to tentatively measure a mass of 28[SUP]+11[/SUP][SUB]-11[/SUB] M[SUB]⊕[/SUB] for the object transiting with a 11.76 d period. These measurements imply low density objects, with a significant gaseous envelope. The detailed analysis of the photometric and spectroscopic data serves to estimate the probability that the observations are caused by transiting Neptune-sized planets as much as over 26 times higher than a blend scenario involving only one transiting planet and as much as over 900 times higher than a scenario involving two blends and no planets. The radial velocities show a long-term modulation that might be attributed to a 1.5 M[SUB]Jup[/SUB] planet orbiting at 1.8 AU from the host, but more data are required to determine the precise orbital parameters of this companion. The CoRoT space mission, launched on 27 December 2006, has been developed and is operated by the CNES, with the contribution of Austria, Belgium, Brazil, ESA (RSSD and Science Program), Germany, and Spain. Some of the observations were made with the HARPS spectrograph at ESO La Silla Observatory (184.C-0639) and with the HIRES spectrograph at the Keck Telescope (N035Hr, N143Hr 260 and N095Hr). Partly based on observations obtained at ESO Paranal Observatory, Chile (086.C-0235(A) and B).Tables 2-4 and Fig. 12 are available in electronic form at <A href="http://www.aanda.org/10.1051/0004-6361/201118662/olm">http://www.aanda.org</A> [less ▲]

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See detailA window on exoplanet dynamical histories: Rossiter-McLaughlin observations of WASP-13b and WASP-32b
Brothwell, R.D.; Watson, C.A.; Hébrard, G. et al

in Monthly Notices of the Royal Astronomical Society (2014), 440(4), 3392-3401

We present Rossiter-McLaughlin observations of WASP-13b and WASP-32b and determine the sky-projected angle between the normal of the planetary orbit and the stellar rotation axis (lambda). WASP-13b and ... [more ▼]

We present Rossiter-McLaughlin observations of WASP-13b and WASP-32b and determine the sky-projected angle between the normal of the planetary orbit and the stellar rotation axis (lambda). WASP-13b and WASP-32b both have prograde orbits and are consistent with alignment with measured sky-projected angles of lambda =8°^{+13}_{-12} and lambda =-2°^{+17}_{-19}, respectively. Both WASP-13 and WASP-32 have Teff < 6250 K, and therefore, these systems support the general trend that aligned planetary systems are preferentially found orbiting cool host stars. A Lomb-Scargle periodogram analysis was carried out on archival SuperWASP data for both systems. A statistically significant stellar rotation period detection (above 99.9 per cent confidence) was identified for the WASP-32 system with Prot = 11.6 ± 1.0 days. This rotation period is in agreement with the predicted stellar rotation period calculated from the stellar radius, R*, and vsin i if a stellar inclination of i* = 90° is assumed. With the determined rotation period, the true 3D angle between the stellar rotation axis and the planetary orbit, psi, was found to be psi = 11° ± 14°. We conclude with a discussion on the alignment of systems around cool host stars with Teff < 6150 K by calculating the tidal dissipation time-scale. We find that systems with short tidal dissipation time-scales are preferentially aligned and systems with long tidal dissipation time-scales have a broad range of obliquities. [less ▲]

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See detailWASP-71b: a bloated hot Jupiter in an 2.9-day, prograde orbit around an evolved F8 star
Smith, A. M. S.; Anderson, D. R.; Bouchy, F. et al

in Astronomy and Astrophysics (2013), 552

We report the discovery by the WASP transit survey of a highly-irradiated, massive (2.242 +/- 0.080 MJup) planet which transits a bright (V = 10.6), evolved F8 star every 2.9 days. The planet, WASP-71b ... [more ▼]

We report the discovery by the WASP transit survey of a highly-irradiated, massive (2.242 +/- 0.080 MJup) planet which transits a bright (V = 10.6), evolved F8 star every 2.9 days. The planet, WASP-71b, is larger than Jupiter (1.46 +/- 0.13 RJup), but less dense (0.71 +/- 0.16 {\rho}Jup). We also report spectroscopic observations made during transit with the CORALIE spectrograph, which allow us to make a highly-significant detection of the Rossiter-McLaughlin effect. We determine the sky-projected angle between the stellar-spin and planetary-orbit axes to be {\lambda} = 20.1 +/- 9.7 degrees, i.e. the system is 'aligned', according to the widely-used alignment criteria that systems are regarded as misaligned only when {\lambda} is measured to be greater than 10 degrees with 3-{\sigma} confidence. WASP-71, with an effective temperature of 6059 +/- 98 K, therefore fits the previously observed pattern that only stars hotter than 6250 K are host to planets in misaligned orbits. We emphasise, however, that {\lambda} is merely the sky-projected obliquity angle; we are unable to determine whether the stellar-spin and planetary-orbit axes are misaligned along the line-of-sight. With a mass of 1.56 +/- 0.07 Msun, WASP-71 was previously hotter than 6250 K, and therefore might have been significantly misaligned in the past. If so, the planetary orbit has been realigned, presumably through tidal interactions with the cooling star's growing convective zone. [less ▲]

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See detailDiscovery of WASP-65b and WASP-75b: Two Hot Jupiters Without Highly Inflated Radii
Gómez Maqueo Chew, Y.; Faedi, F.; Pollacco, D. et al

in Astronomy and Astrophysics (2013)

We report the discovery of two transiting hot Jupiters, WASP-65b (Mpl = 1.55 ± 0.16 MJ; Rpl = 1.11 ± 0.06 RJ), and WASP-75b (Mpl = 1.07 ± 0.05 MJ; Rpl = 1.27 ± 0.05 RJ). They orbit their host star every ... [more ▼]

We report the discovery of two transiting hot Jupiters, WASP-65b (Mpl = 1.55 ± 0.16 MJ; Rpl = 1.11 ± 0.06 RJ), and WASP-75b (Mpl = 1.07 ± 0.05 MJ; Rpl = 1.27 ± 0.05 RJ). They orbit their host star every ~2.311, and ~2.484 days, respectively. The planet host WASP-65 is a G6 star (Teff = 5600 K, [Fe/H] = -0.07 ± 0.07, age ≳8 Gyr); WASP-75 is an F9 star (Teff = 6100 K, [Fe/H] = 0.07 ± 0.09, age ~ 3 Gyr). WASP-65b is one of the densest known exoplanets in the mass range 0.1 and 2.0 MJ (rhopl = 1.13 ± 0.08 rhoJ), a mass range where a large fraction of planets are found to be inflated with respect to theoretical planet models. WASP-65b is one of only a handful of planets with masses of ~1.5 MJ, a mass regime surprisingly underrepresented among the currently known hot Jupiters. The radius of WASP-75b is slightly inflated (≲10%) as compared to theoretical planet models with no core, and has a density similar to that of Saturn (rhopl = 0.52 ± 0.06 rhoJ). [less ▲]

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See detailThree irradiated and bloated hot Jupiters: WASP-76b, WASP-82b & WASP-90b
West, R. G.; Almenara, J.-M.; Anderson, D. R. et al

E-print/Working paper (2013)

We report three new transiting hot-Jupiter planets discovered from the WASP surveys combined with radial velocities from OHP/SOPHIE and Euler/CORALIE and photometry from Euler and TRAPPIST. All three ... [more ▼]

We report three new transiting hot-Jupiter planets discovered from the WASP surveys combined with radial velocities from OHP/SOPHIE and Euler/CORALIE and photometry from Euler and TRAPPIST. All three planets are inflated, with radii 1.7-1.8 Rjup. All orbit hot stars, F5-F7, and all three stars have evolved, post-MS radii (1.7-2.2 Rsun). Thus the three planets, with orbits of 1.8-3.9 d, are among the most irradiated planets known. This reinforces the correlation between inflated planets and stellar irradiation. [less ▲]

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See detailTransiting exoplanets from the CoRoT space mission. XXIV. CoRoT-25b and CoRoT-26b: two low-density giant planets
Almenara, J. M.; Bouchy, F.; Gaulme, P. et al

in Astronomy and Astrophysics (2013), 555

We report the discovery of two transiting exoplanets, CoRoT-25b and CoRoT-26b, both of low density, one of which is in the Saturn mass-regime. For each star, ground-based complementary observations ... [more ▼]

We report the discovery of two transiting exoplanets, CoRoT-25b and CoRoT-26b, both of low density, one of which is in the Saturn mass-regime. For each star, ground-based complementary observations through optical photometry and radial velocity measurements secured the planetary nature of the transiting body and allowed us to fully characterize them. For CoRoT-25b we found a planetary mass of 0.27 ± 0.04 M[SUB]Jup[/SUB], a radius of 1.08[SUB]-0.10[/SUB][SUP]+0.3[/SUP] R[SUB]Jup[/SUB] and hence a mean density of 0.15[SUB]-0.06[/SUB][SUP]+0.15[/SUP] g cm[SUP]-3[/SUP]. The planet orbits an F9 main-sequence star in a 4.86-day period, that has a V magnitude of 15.0, solar metallicity, and an age of 4.5[SUB]-2.0[/SUB][SUP]+1.8[/SUP]-Gyr. CoRoT-26b orbits a slightly evolved G5 star of 9.06 ± 1.5-Gyr age in a 4.20-day period that hassolar metallicity and a V magnitude of 15.8. With a mass of 0.52 ± 0.05 M[SUB]Jup[/SUB], a radius of 1.26[SUB]-0.07[/SUB][SUP]+0.13[/SUP] R[SUB]Jup[/SUB], and a mean density of 0.28[SUB]-0.07[/SUB][SUP]+0.09[/SUP] g cm[SUP]-3[/SUP], it belongs to the low-mass hot-Jupiter population. Planetary evolution models allowed us to estimate a core mass of a few tens of Earth mass for the two planets with heavy-element mass fractions of 0.52[SUB]-0.15[/SUB][SUP]+0.08[/SUP] and 0.26[SUB]-0.08[/SUB][SUP]+0.05[/SUP], respectively, assuming that a small fraction of the incoming flux is dissipated at the center of the planet. In addition, these models indicate that CoRoT-26b is anomalously large compared with what standard models could account for, indicating that dissipation from stellar heating could cause this size. The CoRoT space mission, launched on December 27th 2006, has been developed and is operated by CNES, with the contribution of Austria, Belgium, Brazil, ESA (RSSD and Science Programme), Germany and Spain. Partly based on observations obtained at the European Southern Observatory at Paranal and La Silla, Chile in programs 083.C-0690(A), 184.C-0639. [less ▲]

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See detailThe HARPS search for southern extra-solar planets. XXXIV. A planetary system around the nearby M dwarf GJ163, with a super-Earth possibly in the habitable zone
Bonfils, X.; Lo Curto, G.; Correia, A. C. M. et al

E-print/Working paper (2013)

The meter-per-second precision achieved by today velocimeters enables the search for 1-10 M_Earth planets in the habitable zone of cool stars. This paper reports on the detection of 3 planets orbiting ... [more ▼]

The meter-per-second precision achieved by today velocimeters enables the search for 1-10 M_Earth planets in the habitable zone of cool stars. This paper reports on the detection of 3 planets orbiting GJ163 (HIP19394), a M3 dwarf monitored by our ESO/HARPS search for planets. We made use of the HARPS spectrograph to collect 150 radial velocities of GJ163 over a period of 8 years. We searched the RV time series for coherent signals and found 5 distinct periodic variabilities. We investigated the stellar activity and casted doubts on the planetary interpretation for 2 signals. Before more data can be acquired we concluded that at least 3 planets are orbiting GJ163. They have orbital periods of P_b=8.632+-0.002, P_c=25.63+-0.03 and P_d=604+-8 days and minimum masses msini = 10.6+-0.6, 6.8+-0.9, and 29+-3 M_Earth, respectively. We hold our interpretations for the 2 additional signals with periods P_(e)=19.4 and P_(f)=108 days. The inner pair presents an orbital period ratio of 2.97, but a dynamical analysis of the system shows that it lays outside the 3:1 mean motion resonance. GJ163c, in particular, is a super-Earth with an equilibrium temperature of T_eq = (302+-10) (1-A)^(1/4) K and may lie in the so called habitable zone for albedo values (A=0.34-0.89) moderately higher than that of Earth (A_Earth=0.2-0.3). [less ▲]

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See detailWASP-54b, WASP-56b and WASP-57b: Three new sub-Jupiter mass planets from SuperWASP
Faedi, F.; Pollacco, D.; Barros, S. C. C. et al

in Astronomy and Astrophysics (2013), 551

We present three newly discovered sub-Jupiter mass planets from the SuperWASP survey: WASP-54b is a heavily bloated planet of mass 0.636+0.025-0.024RJ. It orbits a F9 star, evolving off the main sequence ... [more ▼]

We present three newly discovered sub-Jupiter mass planets from the SuperWASP survey: WASP-54b is a heavily bloated planet of mass 0.636+0.025-0.024RJ. It orbits a F9 star, evolving off the main sequence, every 3.69 days. Our MCMC fit of the system yields a slightly eccentric orbit (e = 0.067+0.033-0.025) for WASP-54b. We investigated further the veracity of our detection of the eccentric orbit for WASP-54b, and we find that it could be real. However, given the brightness of WASP-54 V = 10.42 mag, we encourage observations of a secondary eclipse to draw robust conclusions on both the orbital eccentricity and the thermal structure of the planet. WASP-56b and WASP-57b have masses of 0.571+0.034-0.035MJ and 0.672+0.049-0.046MJ, respectively; and radii of 1.092+0.035-0.033RJ for WASP-56b and 0.916+0.017-0.014RJ for WASP-57b. They orbit main sequence stars of spectral type G6 every 4.67 and 2.84 days, respectively. WASP-56b and WASP-57b show no radius anomaly and a high density possibly implying a large core of heavy elements; possibly as high as ~50 M⊕ in the case of WASP-57b. However,the composition of the deep interior of exoplanets remains still undetermined. Thus, more exoplanet discoveries such as the ones presented in this paper, are needed to understand and constrain giant planets' physical properties. [less ▲]

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See detailTransiting exoplanets from the CoRoT space mission XXI. CoRoT-19b: A low density planet orbiting an old inactive F9V-star
Guenther, E. W.; Diaz, R. F.; Gazzano, J-C et al

in Astronomy and Astrophysics (2012), 537

Observations of transiting extrasolar planets are of key importance to our understanding of planets because their mass, radius, and mass density can be determined. The CoRoT space mission allows us to ... [more ▼]

Observations of transiting extrasolar planets are of key importance to our understanding of planets because their mass, radius, and mass density can be determined. The CoRoT space mission allows us to achieve a very high photometric accuracy. By combining CoRoT data with high-precision radial velocity measurements, we derive precise planetary radii and masses. We report the discovery of CoRoT-19b, a gas-giant planet transiting an old, inactive F9V-type star with a period of four days. After excluding alternative physical configurations mimicking a planetary transit signal, we determine the radius and mass of the planet by combining CoRoT photometry with high-resolution spectroscopy obtained with the echelle spectrographs SOPHIE, HARPS, FIES, and SANDIFORD. To improve the precision of its ephemeris and the epoch, we observed additional transits with the TRAPPIST and Euler telescopes. Using HARPS spectra obtained during the transit, we then determine the projected angle between the spin of the star and the orbit of the planet. We find that the host star of CoRoT-19b is an inactive F9V-type star close to the end of its main-sequence life. The host star has a mass M*=1.21+/-0.05 Msun and radius R*=1.65+/-0.04 Rsun. The planet has a mass of Mp=1.11+/-0.06 Mjup and radius of Rp=1.29+/-0.03 Rjup. The resulting bulk density is only rho=0.71+/-0.06 gcm-3, which is much lower than that for Jupiter. The exoplanet CoRoT-19b is an example of a giant planet of almost the same mass as Jupiter but a 30% larger radius. [less ▲]

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See detailAnalysis of Spin-Orbit Alignment in the WASP-32, WASP-38, and HAT-P-27/WASP-40 Systems
Brown, D. J. A.; Collier Cameron, A.; Díaz, R. F. et al

in Astrophysical Journal (2012), 760

We present measurements of the spin-orbit alignment angle, λ, for the hot Jupiter systems WASP-32, WASP-38, and HAT-P-27/WASP-40, based on data obtained using the HARPS spectrograph. We analyze the ... [more ▼]

We present measurements of the spin-orbit alignment angle, λ, for the hot Jupiter systems WASP-32, WASP-38, and HAT-P-27/WASP-40, based on data obtained using the HARPS spectrograph. We analyze the Rossiter-McLaughlin effect for all three systems and also carry out Doppler tomography for WASP-32 and WASP-38. We find that WASP-32 (T [SUB]eff[/SUB] = 6140[SUP]+90[/SUP] [SUB]- 100[/SUB] K) is aligned, with an alignment angle of λ = 10fdg5[SUP] + 6.4[/SUP] [SUB] - 6.5[/SUB] obtained through tomography, and that WASP-38 (T [SUB]eff[/SUB] = 6180[SUP]+40[/SUP] [SUB]- 60[/SUB] K) is also aligned, with tomographic analysis yielding λ = 7fdg5[SUP] + 4.7[/SUP] [SUB] - 6.1[/SUB]. The latter result provides an order-of-magnitude improvement in the uncertainty in λ compared to the previous analysis of Simpson et al. We are only able to loosely constrain the angle for HAT-P-27/WASP-40 (T [SUB]eff[/SUB] = 5190[SUP]+160[/SUP] [SUB]- 170[/SUB] K) to λ = 24fdg2[SUP] + 76.0[/SUP] [SUB] - 44.5[/SUB], owing to the poor signal-to-noise ratio of our data. We consider this result a non-detection under a slightly updated version of the alignment test of Brown et al. We place our results in the context of the full sample of spin-orbit alignment measurements, finding that they provide further support for previously established trends. Based on observations (under proposal 087.C-0649) made using the HARPS High Resolution Échelle Spectrograph mounted on the ESO 3.6 m at the ESO La Silla observatory. [less ▲]

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See detailPlanetary transit candidates in the CoRoT LRa01 field
Carone, L.; Gandolfi, D.; Cabrera, J. et al

in Astronomy and Astrophysics (2012), 538

Context: CoRoT is a pioneering space mission whose primary goals are stellar seismology and extrasolar planets search. Its surveys of large stellar fields generate numerous planetary candidates whose ... [more ▼]

Context: CoRoT is a pioneering space mission whose primary goals are stellar seismology and extrasolar planets search. Its surveys of large stellar fields generate numerous planetary candidates whose lightcurves have transit-like features. An extensive analytical and observational follow-up effort is undertaken to classify these candidates. Aims: The list of planetary transit candidates from the CoRoT LRa01 star field in the Monoceros constellation towards the Galactic anti-center is presented. The CoRoT observations of LRa01 lasted from 24 October 2007 to 3 March 2008. Methods: 7470 chromatic and 3938 monochromatic lightcurves were acquired and analysed. Instrumental noise and stellar variability were treated with several filtering tools by different teams from the CoRoT community. Different transit search algorithms were applied to the lightcurves. Results: Fifty-one stars were classified as planetary transit candidates in LRa01. Thirty-seven (i.e., 73 % of all candidates) are "good" planetary candidates based on photometric analysis only. Thirty-two (i.e., 87 % of the "good" candidates) have been followed-up. At the time of this writing twenty-two cases have been solved and five planets have been discovered: three transiting hot-Jupiters (CoRoT-5b, CoRoT-12b, and CoRoT-21b), the first terrestrial transiting planet (CoRoT-7b), and another planet in the same system (CoRoT-7c, detected by radial velocity survey only). Evidences of another non-transiting planet in the CoRoT-7 system, namely CoRoT-7d, have been recently found. [less ▲]

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See detailTransiting exoplanets from the CoRoT space mission. XXIII. CoRoT-21b: a doomed large Jupiter around a faint subgiant star
Pätzold, M.; Endl, M.; Csizmadia, Sz et al

in Astronomy and Astrophysics (2012), 545

CoRoT-21, a F8IV star of magnitude V = 16 mag, was observed by the space telescope CoRoT during the Long Run 01 (LRa01) in the first winter field (constellation Monoceros) from October 2007 to March 2008 ... [more ▼]

CoRoT-21, a F8IV star of magnitude V = 16 mag, was observed by the space telescope CoRoT during the Long Run 01 (LRa01) in the first winter field (constellation Monoceros) from October 2007 to March 2008. Transits were discovered during the light curve processing. Radial velocity follow-up observations, however, were performed mainly by the 10-m Keck telescope in January 2010. The companion CoRoT-21b is a Jupiter-like planet of 2.26 ± 0.33 Jupiter masses and 1.30 ± 0.14 Jupiter radii in an circular orbit of semi-major axis 0.0417 ± 0.0011 AU and an orbital period of 2.72474 ± 0.00014 days. The planetary bulk density is (1.36 ± 0.48) × 10[SUP]3[/SUP] kg m[SUP]-3[/SUP], very similar to the bulk density of Jupiter, and follows an M[SUP]1/3[/SUP] - R relation like Jupiter. The F8IV star is a sub-giant star of 1.29 ± 0.09 solar masses and 1.95 ± 0.2 solar radii. The star and the planet exchange extremetidal forces that will lead to orbital decay and extreme spin-up of the stellar rotation within 800 Myr if the stellar dissipation is Q[SUB]∗[/SUB]/k[SUB]2∗[/SUB] ≤ 10[SUP]7[/SUP]. The CoRoT space mission, launched on December 27th 2006, has been developed and is operated by CNES, with the contribution of Austria, Belgium, Brazil, ESA (RSSD and Science Programme), Germany and Spain. [less ▲]

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See detailXX. CoRoT-20b: A very high density, high eccentricity transiting giant planet
Deleuil, M.; Bonomo, A. S.; Ferraz-Mello, S. et al

in Astronomy and Astrophysics (2012), 538

We report the discovery by the CoRoT space mission of a new giant planet, CoRoT-20b. The planet has a mass of 4.24 +/- 0.23 MJ and a radius of 0.84 +/- 0.04 RJ. With a mean density of 8.87 +/- 1.10 g/cm^3 ... [more ▼]

We report the discovery by the CoRoT space mission of a new giant planet, CoRoT-20b. The planet has a mass of 4.24 +/- 0.23 MJ and a radius of 0.84 +/- 0.04 RJ. With a mean density of 8.87 +/- 1.10 g/cm^3, it is among the most compact planets known so far. Evolution models for the planet suggest a mass of heavy elements of the order of 800 ME if embedded in a central core, requiring a revision either of the planet formation models or of planet evolution and structure models. We note however that smaller amounts of heavy elements are expected from more realistic models in which they are mixed throughout the envelope. The planet orbits a G-type star with an orbital period of 9.24 days and an eccentricity of 0.56. The star's projected rotational velocity is vsini = 4.5 +/- 1.0 km/s, corresponding to a spin period of 11.5 +/- 3.1 days if its axis of rotation is perpendicular to the orbital plane. In the framework of Darwinian theories and neglecting stellar magnetic breaking, we calculate the tidal evolution of the system and show that CoRoT-20b is presently one of the very few Darwin-stable planets that is evolving towards a triple synchronous state with equality of the orbital, planetary and stellar spin periods. [less ▲]

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See detailTransiting exoplanets from the CoRoT space mission. XXII. CoRoT-16b: a hot Jupiter with a hint of eccentricity around a faint solar-like star
Ollivier, M; Gillon, Michaël ULg; Santerne, A et al

in Astronomy and Astrophysics (2012), 541

<BR /> Aims: We report the discovery of CoRoT-16b, a low density hot jupiter that orbits a faint G5V star (mV = 15.63) in 5.3523 ± 0.0002 days with slight eccentricity. A fit of the data with no a priori ... [more ▼]

<BR /> Aims: We report the discovery of CoRoT-16b, a low density hot jupiter that orbits a faint G5V star (mV = 15.63) in 5.3523 ± 0.0002 days with slight eccentricity. A fit of the data with no a priori assumptions on the orbit leads to an eccentricity of 0.33 ± 0.1. We discuss this value and also derive the mass and radius of the planet. <BR /> Methods: We analyse the photometric transit curve of CoRoT-16 given by the CoRoT satellite, and radial velocity data from the HARPS and HIRES spectrometers. A combined analysis using a Markov chain Monte Carlo algorithm is used to get the system parameters. <BR /> Results: CoRoT-16b is a 0.535 -0.083/+0.085 M[SUB]J[/SUB], 1.17 -0.14/+0.16 R[SUB]J[/SUB] hot Jupiter with a density of 0.44 -0.14/+0.21 g cm[SUP]-3[/SUP]. Despite its short orbital distance (0.0618 ± 0.0015 AU) and the age of the parent star (6.73 ± 2.8 Gyr), the planet orbit exhibits significantly non-zero eccentricity. This is very uncommon for this type of objects as tidal effects tend to circularise the orbit. This value is discussed taking into account the characteristics of the star and the observation accuracy. The CoRoT space mission, launched on December 27, 2006, has been developed and is operated by the CNES with the contribution of Austria, Belgium, Brasil, ESA, Germany, and Spain.Observations made with the HARPS spectrograph at ESO La Silla Observatory (HARPS programs 083.C-0186 and 184.C-0639) and the HIRES spectrograph at the Keck Observatory (NASA-Keck programs N035Hr, N143Hr and N095Hr). [less ▲]

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See detailRossiter-McLaughlin effect measurements for WASP-16, WASP-25 and WASP-31★
Brown, D J A; Cameron, A Collier; Anderson, D R et al

in Monthly Notices of the Royal Astronomical Society (2012)

We present new measurements of the Rossiter-McLaughlin (RM) effect for three Wide Angle Search for transiting Planets (WASP) planetary systems, WASP-16, WASP-25 and WASP-31, from a combined analysis of ... [more ▼]

We present new measurements of the Rossiter-McLaughlin (RM) effect for three Wide Angle Search for transiting Planets (WASP) planetary systems, WASP-16, WASP-25 and WASP-31, from a combined analysis of their complete sets of photometric and spectroscopic data. We find a low-amplitude RM effect for WASP-16 (T[SUB]eff[/SUB]= 5700 ± 150 K), suggesting that the star is a slow rotator and thus of an advanced age, and obtain a projected alignment angle of ?. For WASP-25 (T[SUB]eff[/SUB]= 5750 ± 100 K), we detect a projected spin-orbit angle of λ= 14°.6 ± 6°.7. WASP-31 (T[SUB]eff[/SUB]= 6300 ± 100 K) is found to be well aligned, with a projected spin-orbit angle of λ= 2°.8 ± 3°.1. A circular orbit is consistent with the data for all three systems, in agreement with their respective discovery papers. We consider the results for these systems in the context of the ensemble of RM measurements made to date. We find that whilst WASP-16 fits the hypothesis of Winn et al. that 'cool' stars (T[SUB]eff[/SUB] < 6250 K) are preferentially aligned, WASP-31 has little impact on the proposed trend. We bring the total distribution of the true spin-orbit alignment angle, ψ, up to date, noting that recent results have improved the agreement with the theory of Fabrycky & Tremaine at mid-range angles. We also suggest a new test for judging misalignment using the Bayesian information criterion, according to which WASP-25 b's orbit should be considered to be aligned. [less ▲]

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See detailPlanetary transit candidates in the CoRoT-SRc01 field
Erikson, A.; Santerne, A.; Renner, S. et al

in Astronomy and Astrophysics (2012), 539

Context. The space mission CoRoT is devoted to the analysis of stellar variability and the photometric detection of extrasolar planets. <BR /> Aims: We present the list of planetary transit candidates ... [more ▼]

Context. The space mission CoRoT is devoted to the analysis of stellar variability and the photometric detection of extrasolar planets. <BR /> Aims: We present the list of planetary transit candidates detected in the first short run observed by CoRoT that targeted SRc01, towards the Galactic center in the direction of Aquila, which lasted from April to May 2007. <BR /> Methods: Among the acquired data, we analyzed those for 1269 sources in the chromatic bands and 5705 in the monochromatic band. Instrumental noise and the stellar variability were treated with several detrending tools, to which several transit-search algorithms were subsequently applied. <BR /> Results: Fifty-one sources were classified as planetary transit candidates and 26 were followed up with ground-based observations. Until now, no planet has been detected in the CoRoT data from the SRc01 field. The CoRoT space mission, launched on December 27th 2006, has been developed and is operated by CNES, with contributions from Austria, Belgium, Brazil, ESA, Germany, and Spain. The CoRoT data are available to the community from the CoRoT archive: <A href="http://idoc-corot.ias.u-psud.fr">http://idoc-corot.ias.u-psud.fr</A>Based in part on observations made with the 1.93-m telescope at Observatoire de Haute Provence (CNRS), France (SOPHIE Program 08A.PNP.MOUT).Based in part on observations made with the ESO-3.60-m telescope at La Silla Observatory (ESO), Chile (HARPS Program ESO - 081.C-0388) and with the ESO-VLT telescope at Paranal Observatory (ESO), Chile (FLAMES Program ESO - 081.C-0413). [less ▲]

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See detailTransiting exoplanets from the CoRoT space mission Resolving the nature of transit candidates for the LRa03 and SRa03 fields
Cavarroc, C.; Moutou, C.; Gandolfi, D. et al

in Astrophysics & Space Science (2012), 337

CoRoT is a space telescope which aims at studying internal structure of stars and detecting extrasolar planets. We present here a list of transits detected in the light curves of stars observed by CoRoT ... [more ▼]

CoRoT is a space telescope which aims at studying internal structure of stars and detecting extrasolar planets. We present here a list of transits detected in the light curves of stars observed by CoRoT in two fields in the anti-center direction: the LRa03 one observed during 148 days from 3 October 2009 to 1 March 2010 followed by the SRa03 one from the 5 March 2010 to the 29 March 2010 during 25 days. 5329 light curves for the LRa03 field and 4169 for the SRa03 field were analyzed by the detection team of CoRoT. Then some of the selected exoplanetary candidates have been followed up from the ground. In the LRa03 field, 19 exoplanet candidates have been found, 8 remain unsolved. No secured planet has been found yet. In the SRa03 field, there were 11 exoplanetary candidates among which 6 cases remain unsolved and 3 planets have been found: CoRoT-18b, CoRoT-19b, CoRoT-20b. [less ▲]

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See detailTransiting exoplanets from the CoRoT space mission - XIX. CoRoT-23b: a dense hot Jupiter on an eccentric orbit
Rouan, D.; Parviainen, H.; Moutou, C. et al

in Astronomy and Astrophysics (2011), 537

We report the detection of CoRoT-23b, a hot Jupiter transiting in front of its host star with a period of 3.6314 \pm 0.0001 days. This planet was discovered thanks to photometric data secured with the ... [more ▼]

We report the detection of CoRoT-23b, a hot Jupiter transiting in front of its host star with a period of 3.6314 \pm 0.0001 days. This planet was discovered thanks to photometric data secured with the CoRoT satellite, combined with spectroscopic radial velocity (RV) measurements. A photometric search for possible background eclipsing binaries conducted at CFHT and OGS concluded with a very low risk of false positives. The usual techniques of combining RV and transit data simultaneously were used to derive stellar and planetary parameters. The planet has a mass of Mp = 2.8 \pm 0.3 MJup, a radius of Rpl = 1.05 \pm 0.13 RJup, a density of \approx 3 g cm-3. RV data also clearly reveal a non zero eccentricity of e = 0.16 \pm 0.02. The planet orbits a mature G0 main sequence star of V =15.5 mag, with a mass M\star = 1.14 \pm 0.08 M\odot, a radius R\star = 1. 61 \pm 0.18 R\odot and quasi-solar abundances. The age of the system is evaluated to be 7 Gyr, not far from the transition to subgiant, in agreement with the rather large stellar radius. The two features of a significant eccentricity of the orbit and of a fairly high density are fairly uncommon for a hot Jupiter. The high density is, however, consistent with a model of contraction of a planet at this mass, given the age of the system. On the other hand, at such an age, circularization is expected to be completed. In fact, we show that for this planetary mass and orbital distance, any initial eccentricity should not totally vanish after 7 Gyr, as long as the tidal quality factor Qp is more than a few 105, a value that is the lower bound of the usually expected range. Even if Corot-23b features a density and an eccentricity that are atypical of a hot Jupiter, it is thus not an enigmatic object. [less ▲]

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