References of "Guenther, E. W"
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See detailTransiting exoplanets from the CoRoT space mission. XXVI. CoRoT-24: a transiting multiplanet system
Alonso, R.; Moutou, C.; Endl, M. et al

in Astronomy and Astrophysics (2014), 567

We present the discovery of a candidate multiply transiting system, the first one found in the CoRoT mission. Two transit-like features with periods of 5.11 and 11.76 d are detected in the CoRoT light ... [more ▼]

We present the discovery of a candidate multiply transiting system, the first one found in the CoRoT mission. Two transit-like features with periods of 5.11 and 11.76 d are detected in the CoRoT light curve around a main sequence K1V star of r = 15.1. If the features are due to transiting planets around the same star, these would correspond to objects of 3.7 ± 0.4 and 5.0 ± 0.5 R[SUB]⊕[/SUB] , respectively. Several radial velocities serve to provide an upper limit of 5.7 M[SUB]⊕[/SUB] for the 5.11 d signal and to tentatively measure a mass of 28[SUP]+11[/SUP][SUB]-11[/SUB] M[SUB]⊕[/SUB] for the object transiting with a 11.76 d period. These measurements imply low density objects, with a significant gaseous envelope. The detailed analysis of the photometric and spectroscopic data serves to estimate the probability that the observations are caused by transiting Neptune-sized planets as much as over 26 times higher than a blend scenario involving only one transiting planet and as much as over 900 times higher than a scenario involving two blends and no planets. The radial velocities show a long-term modulation that might be attributed to a 1.5 M[SUB]Jup[/SUB] planet orbiting at 1.8 AU from the host, but more data are required to determine the precise orbital parameters of this companion. The CoRoT space mission, launched on 27 December 2006, has been developed and is operated by the CNES, with the contribution of Austria, Belgium, Brazil, ESA (RSSD and Science Program), Germany, and Spain. Some of the observations were made with the HARPS spectrograph at ESO La Silla Observatory (184.C-0639) and with the HIRES spectrograph at the Keck Telescope (N035Hr, N143Hr 260 and N095Hr). Partly based on observations obtained at ESO Paranal Observatory, Chile (086.C-0235(A) and B).Tables 2-4 and Fig. 12 are available in electronic form at <A href="http://www.aanda.org/10.1051/0004-6361/201118662/olm">http://www.aanda.org</A> [less ▲]

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See detailHigh angular resolution imaging and infrared spectroscopy of CoRoT candidates
Guenther, E. W.; Fridlund, M.; Alonso, R. et al

in Astronomy and Astrophysics (2013), 556

Context. Studies of transiting extrasolar planets are of key importance for understanding the nature of planets outside our solar system because their masses, diameters, and bulk densities can be measured ... [more ▼]

Context. Studies of transiting extrasolar planets are of key importance for understanding the nature of planets outside our solar system because their masses, diameters, and bulk densities can be measured. An important part of transit-search programmes is the removal of false-positives. In the case of the CoRoT space mission, the majority of the false-positives are removed by a detailed analysis of the light curves and by seeing-limited imaging in- and out-of-transit. However, the critical question is how many of the candidates that passed all these tests are false-positives. Such false-positives can be caused by eclipsing binaries, which are either related or unrelated to the targets. <BR /> Aims: For our study we selected 25 CoRoT candidates that have already been screened against false-positives using detailed analysis of the light curves and seeing-limited imaging, which has transits that are between 0.7 and 0.05% deep. Our aim is to search for companion candidates that had not been recognized in previous observations. <BR /> Methods: We observed 20 candidates with the adaptive optics imager NaCo and 18 with the high-resolution infrared spectrograph CRIRES. <BR /> Results: We found previously unknown stars within 2'' of the targets in seven of the candidates. All of these are too faint and too close to the targets to have been previously detected with seeing-limited telescopes in the optical. Our study thus leads to the surprising results that if we remove all candidates excluded by the sophisticated analysis of the light-curve, as well as carrying out deep imaging with seeing-limited telescopes, still 28-35% of the remaining candidates are found to possess companions that are bright enough to be false-positives. <BR /> Conclusions: Given that the companion candidates cluster around the targets and that the J - K colours are consistent with physical companions, we conclude that the companion candidates are more likely to be physical companions rather than unrelated field stars. Based on observations obtained at the European Southern Observatory at Paranal, Chile in programmes 282.C-5015A, 282.C-5015B, 282.C-5015C, 285.C-5045A, and 285.C-5045B, 086.C-0235A, 086.C-0235B, 088.C-0707A, 088.C-0707B, 090.C-0251A, 090.C-0251B, and 091.C-203(A).Appendices A and B are available in electronic form at <A href="http://www.aanda.org">http://www.aanda.org</A> [less ▲]

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See detailTransiting exoplanets from the CoRoT space mission XXI. CoRoT-19b: A low density planet orbiting an old inactive F9V-star
Guenther, E. W.; Diaz, R. F.; Gazzano, J-C et al

in Astronomy and Astrophysics (2012), 537

Observations of transiting extrasolar planets are of key importance to our understanding of planets because their mass, radius, and mass density can be determined. The CoRoT space mission allows us to ... [more ▼]

Observations of transiting extrasolar planets are of key importance to our understanding of planets because their mass, radius, and mass density can be determined. The CoRoT space mission allows us to achieve a very high photometric accuracy. By combining CoRoT data with high-precision radial velocity measurements, we derive precise planetary radii and masses. We report the discovery of CoRoT-19b, a gas-giant planet transiting an old, inactive F9V-type star with a period of four days. After excluding alternative physical configurations mimicking a planetary transit signal, we determine the radius and mass of the planet by combining CoRoT photometry with high-resolution spectroscopy obtained with the echelle spectrographs SOPHIE, HARPS, FIES, and SANDIFORD. To improve the precision of its ephemeris and the epoch, we observed additional transits with the TRAPPIST and Euler telescopes. Using HARPS spectra obtained during the transit, we then determine the projected angle between the spin of the star and the orbit of the planet. We find that the host star of CoRoT-19b is an inactive F9V-type star close to the end of its main-sequence life. The host star has a mass M*=1.21+/-0.05 Msun and radius R*=1.65+/-0.04 Rsun. The planet has a mass of Mp=1.11+/-0.06 Mjup and radius of Rp=1.29+/-0.03 Rjup. The resulting bulk density is only rho=0.71+/-0.06 gcm-3, which is much lower than that for Jupiter. The exoplanet CoRoT-19b is an example of a giant planet of almost the same mass as Jupiter but a 30% larger radius. [less ▲]

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See detailPlanetary transit candidates in the CoRoT LRa01 field
Carone, L.; Gandolfi, D.; Cabrera, J. et al

in Astronomy and Astrophysics (2012), 538

Context: CoRoT is a pioneering space mission whose primary goals are stellar seismology and extrasolar planets search. Its surveys of large stellar fields generate numerous planetary candidates whose ... [more ▼]

Context: CoRoT is a pioneering space mission whose primary goals are stellar seismology and extrasolar planets search. Its surveys of large stellar fields generate numerous planetary candidates whose lightcurves have transit-like features. An extensive analytical and observational follow-up effort is undertaken to classify these candidates. Aims: The list of planetary transit candidates from the CoRoT LRa01 star field in the Monoceros constellation towards the Galactic anti-center is presented. The CoRoT observations of LRa01 lasted from 24 October 2007 to 3 March 2008. Methods: 7470 chromatic and 3938 monochromatic lightcurves were acquired and analysed. Instrumental noise and stellar variability were treated with several filtering tools by different teams from the CoRoT community. Different transit search algorithms were applied to the lightcurves. Results: Fifty-one stars were classified as planetary transit candidates in LRa01. Thirty-seven (i.e., 73 % of all candidates) are "good" planetary candidates based on photometric analysis only. Thirty-two (i.e., 87 % of the "good" candidates) have been followed-up. At the time of this writing twenty-two cases have been solved and five planets have been discovered: three transiting hot-Jupiters (CoRoT-5b, CoRoT-12b, and CoRoT-21b), the first terrestrial transiting planet (CoRoT-7b), and another planet in the same system (CoRoT-7c, detected by radial velocity survey only). Evidences of another non-transiting planet in the CoRoT-7 system, namely CoRoT-7d, have been recently found. [less ▲]

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See detailPlanetary transit candidates in the CoRoT-SRc01 field
Erikson, A.; Santerne, A.; Renner, S. et al

in Astronomy and Astrophysics (2012), 539

Context. The space mission CoRoT is devoted to the analysis of stellar variability and the photometric detection of extrasolar planets. <BR /> Aims: We present the list of planetary transit candidates ... [more ▼]

Context. The space mission CoRoT is devoted to the analysis of stellar variability and the photometric detection of extrasolar planets. <BR /> Aims: We present the list of planetary transit candidates detected in the first short run observed by CoRoT that targeted SRc01, towards the Galactic center in the direction of Aquila, which lasted from April to May 2007. <BR /> Methods: Among the acquired data, we analyzed those for 1269 sources in the chromatic bands and 5705 in the monochromatic band. Instrumental noise and the stellar variability were treated with several detrending tools, to which several transit-search algorithms were subsequently applied. <BR /> Results: Fifty-one sources were classified as planetary transit candidates and 26 were followed up with ground-based observations. Until now, no planet has been detected in the CoRoT data from the SRc01 field. The CoRoT space mission, launched on December 27th 2006, has been developed and is operated by CNES, with contributions from Austria, Belgium, Brazil, ESA, Germany, and Spain. The CoRoT data are available to the community from the CoRoT archive: <A href="http://idoc-corot.ias.u-psud.fr">http://idoc-corot.ias.u-psud.fr</A>Based in part on observations made with the 1.93-m telescope at Observatoire de Haute Provence (CNRS), France (SOPHIE Program 08A.PNP.MOUT).Based in part on observations made with the ESO-3.60-m telescope at La Silla Observatory (ESO), Chile (HARPS Program ESO - 081.C-0388) and with the ESO-VLT telescope at Paranal Observatory (ESO), Chile (FLAMES Program ESO - 081.C-0413). [less ▲]

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See detailTransiting exoplanets from the CoRoT space mission Resolving the nature of transit candidates for the LRa03 and SRa03 fields
Cavarroc, C.; Moutou, C.; Gandolfi, D. et al

in Astrophysics & Space Science (2012), 337

CoRoT is a space telescope which aims at studying internal structure of stars and detecting extrasolar planets. We present here a list of transits detected in the light curves of stars observed by CoRoT ... [more ▼]

CoRoT is a space telescope which aims at studying internal structure of stars and detecting extrasolar planets. We present here a list of transits detected in the light curves of stars observed by CoRoT in two fields in the anti-center direction: the LRa03 one observed during 148 days from 3 October 2009 to 1 March 2010 followed by the SRa03 one from the 5 March 2010 to the 29 March 2010 during 25 days. 5329 light curves for the LRa03 field and 4169 for the SRa03 field were analyzed by the detection team of CoRoT. Then some of the selected exoplanetary candidates have been followed up from the ground. In the LRa03 field, 19 exoplanet candidates have been found, 8 remain unsolved. No secured planet has been found yet. In the SRa03 field, there were 11 exoplanetary candidates among which 6 cases remain unsolved and 3 planets have been found: CoRoT-18b, CoRoT-19b, CoRoT-20b. [less ▲]

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See detailCoRoT LRa02_E2_0121: Neptune-size planet candidate turns into a hierarchical triple system with a giant primary
Tal-Or, L.; Santerne, A.; Mazeh, T. et al

in Astronomy and Astrophysics (2011), 534

This paper presents the case of CoRoT LRa02_E2_0121, which was initially classified as a Neptune-size transiting-planet candidate on a relatively wide orbit of 36.3 days. Follow-up observations were ... [more ▼]

This paper presents the case of CoRoT LRa02_E2_0121, which was initially classified as a Neptune-size transiting-planet candidate on a relatively wide orbit of 36.3 days. Follow-up observations were performed with UVES, Sandiford, SOPHIE, and HARPS. These observations revealed a faint companion in the spectra. To find the true nature of the system we derived the radial velocities of the faint companion using TODMOR - a two-dimensional correlation technique, applied to the SOPHIE spectra. Modeling the lightcurve with EBAS we discovered a secondary eclipse with a depth of ~0.07%, indicating a diluted eclipsing binary. Combined MCMC modeling of the lightcurve and the radial velocities suggested that CoRoT LRa02_E2_0121 is a hierarchical triple system with an evolved G-type primary and an A-type:F-type grazing eclipsing binary. Such triple systems are difficult to discover. Based on observations made with the 1.93-m telescope at Observatoire de Haute-Provence (CNRS), France, the 3.6-m telescope at La Silla Observatory (ESO), Chile (program 184.C-0639), the VLT at Paranal Observatory (ESO), Chile (program 083.C-0690), and the 2.1-m Otto Struve telescope at McDonald Observatory, Texas, USA. [less ▲]

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See detailTransiting exoplanets from the CoRoT space mission. XVII. The hot Jupiter CoRoT-17b: a very old planet
Csizmadia, Szilard; Moutou, C.; Deleuil, M. et al

in Astronomy and Astrophysics (2011), 531

We report on the discovery of a hot Jupiter-type exoplanet, CoRoT-17b, detected by the CoRoT satellite. It has a mass of 2.43 ± 0.30 M[SUB]Jup[/SUB] and a radius of 1.02 ± 0.07 R[SUB]Jup[/SUB], while its ... [more ▼]

We report on the discovery of a hot Jupiter-type exoplanet, CoRoT-17b, detected by the CoRoT satellite. It has a mass of 2.43 ± 0.30 M[SUB]Jup[/SUB] and a radius of 1.02 ± 0.07 R[SUB]Jup[/SUB], while its mean density is 2.82 ± 0.38 g/cm[SUP]3[/SUP]. CoRoT-17b is in a circular orbit with a period of 3.7681 ± 0.0003 days. The host star is an old (10.7 ± 1.0 Gyr) main-sequence star, which makes it an intriguing object for planetary evolution studies. The planet's internal composition is not well constrained and can range from pure H/He to one that can contain ~380 earth masses of heavier elements. The CoRoT space mission, launched on December 27th 2006, has been developed and is operated by CNES, with the contribution of Austria, Belgium, Brazil, ESA (RSSD and Science Programme), Germany and Spain. Part of the observations were obtained at the Canada-France-Hawaii Telescope (CFHT) which is operated by the National Research Council of Canada, the Institut National des Sciences de l'Univers of the Centre National de la Recherche Scientifique of France, and the University of Hawaii. Based on observations made with HARPS spectrograph on the 3.6-m European Organisation for Astronomical Research in the Southern Hemisphere telescope at La Silla Observatory, Chile (ESO program 184.C-0639). Based on observations made with the IAC80 telescope operated on the island of Tenerife by the Instituto de Astrofísica de Canarias in the Spanish Observatorio del Teide. Part of the data presented herein were obtained at the W.M. Keck Observatory, which is operated as a scientific partnership among the California Institute of Technology, the University of California and the National Aeronautics and Space Administration. The Observatory was made possible by the generous financial support of the W.M. Keck Foundation. [less ▲]

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See detailTransiting exoplanets from the CoRoT space mission. XVI. CoRoT-14b: an unusually dense very hot Jupiter
Tingley, B.; Endl, M.; Gazzano, J*-C et al

in Astronomy and Astrophysics (2011), 528

In this paper, the CoRoT ExoplanetScience Team announces its 14th discovery. Herein, we discuss the observations and analyses that allowed us to derive the parameters of this system: a hot Jupiter with a ... [more ▼]

In this paper, the CoRoT ExoplanetScience Team announces its 14th discovery. Herein, we discuss the observations and analyses that allowed us to derive the parameters of this system: a hot Jupiter with a mass of 7.6 ± 0.6 Jupiter masses orbiting a solar-type star (F9V) with a period of only 1.5 d, less than 5 stellar radii from its parent star. It is unusual for such a massive planet to have such a small orbit: only one other known higher mass exoplanet orbits with a shorter period. The CoRoT space mission, launched on December 27, 2006, has been developed and is operated by the CNES, with the contribution of Austria, Belgium, Brazil, ESA (RSSD and Science Program), Germany and Spain. [less ▲]

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See detailTransiting exoplanets from the CoRoT space mission . XIII. CoRoT-13b: a dense hot Jupiter in transit around a star with solar metallicity and super-solar lithium content
Cabrera, J.; Bruntt, H.; Ollivier, M. et al

in Astronomy and Astrophysics (2010), 522

We announce the discovery of the transiting planet CoRoT-13b. Ground-based follow-up in CFHT and IAC80 confirmed CoRoT's observations. The mass of the planet was measured with the HARPS spectrograph and ... [more ▼]

We announce the discovery of the transiting planet CoRoT-13b. Ground-based follow-up in CFHT and IAC80 confirmed CoRoT's observations. The mass of the planet was measured with the HARPS spectrograph and the properties of the host star were obtained analyzing HIRES spectra from the Keck telescope. It is a hot Jupiter-like planet with an orbital period of 4.04 days, 1.3 Jupiter masses, 0.9 Jupiter radii, and a density of 2.34 g cm[SUP]-3[/SUP]. It orbits a G0V star with T_eff = 5 945 K, M[SUB]*[/SUB] = 1.09 M[SUB]ȯ[/SUB], R_* = 1.01 R[SUB]ȯ[/SUB], solar metallicity, a lithium content of + 1.45 dex, and an estimated age of between 0.12 and 3.15 Gyr. The lithium abundance of the star is consistent with its effective temperature, activity level, and age range derived from the stellar analysis. The density of the planet is extreme for its mass, implies that heavy elements are present with a mass of between about 140 and 300 {M}[SUB]⊕[/SUB]. The CoRoT space mission, launched on December 27th 2006, has been developed and is operated by CNES, with the contribution of Austria, Belgium, Brazil, ESA (RSSD and Science Programme), Germany and Spain. Part of the observations were obtained at the Canada-France-Hawaii Telescope (CFHT) which is operated by the National Research Council of Canada, the Institut National des Sciences de l'Univers of the Centre National de la Recherche Scientifique of France, and the University of Hawaii. Based on observations made with HARPS spectrograph on the 3.6-m European Organisation for Astronomical Research in the Southern Hemisphere telescope at La Silla Observatory, Chile (ESO program 184.C-0639). Based on observations made with the IAC80 telescope operated on the island of Tenerife by the Instituto de Astrofísica de Canarias in the Spanish Observatorio del Teide. Part of the data presented herein were obtained at the W. M. Keck Observatory, which is operated as a scientific partnership among the California Institute of Technology, the University of California and the National Aeronautics and Space Administration. The Observatory was made possible by the generous financial support of the W. M. Keck Foundation. [less ▲]

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See detailTransiting exoplanets from the CoRoT space mission XIV. CoRoT-11b: a transiting massive "hot-Jupiter" in a prograde orbit around a rapidly rotating F-type star
Gandolfi, D.; Hébrard, G.; Alonso, R. et al

in Astronomy and Astrophysics (2010), 524

The CoRoT exoplanet science team announces the discovery of CoRoT-11b, a fairly massive hot-Jupiter transiting a V=12.9 mag F6 dwarf star (M*=1.27 +/- 0.05 Msun, R*=1.37 +/- 0.03 Rsun, Teff=6440 +/- 120 K ... [more ▼]

The CoRoT exoplanet science team announces the discovery of CoRoT-11b, a fairly massive hot-Jupiter transiting a V=12.9 mag F6 dwarf star (M*=1.27 +/- 0.05 Msun, R*=1.37 +/- 0.03 Rsun, Teff=6440 +/- 120 K), with an orbital period of P=2.994329 +/- 0.000011 days and semi-major axis a=0.0436 +/- 0.005 AU. The detection of part of the radial velocity anomaly caused by the Rossiter-McLaughlin effect shows that the transit-like events detected by CoRoT are caused by a planet-sized transiting object in a prograde orbit. The relatively high projected rotational velocity of the star (vsini=40+/-5 km/s) places CoRoT-11 among the most rapidly rotating planet host stars discovered so far. With a planetary mass of mp=2.33+/-0.34 Mjup and radius rp=1.43+/-0.03 Rjup, the resulting mean density of CoRoT-11b (rho=0.99+/-0.15 g/cm^3) can be explained with a model for an inflated hydrogen-planet with a solar composition and a high level of energy dissipation in its interior. [less ▲]

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See detailPlanetary transit candidates in CoRoT-LRc01 field
Cabrera, J.; Fridlund, M.; Ollivier, M. et al

in Astronomy and Astrophysics (2009), 506

Aims: We present here the list of planetary transit candidates detected in the first long run observed by CoRoT: LRc01, towards the galactic center in the direction of Aquila, which lasted from May to ... [more ▼]

Aims: We present here the list of planetary transit candidates detected in the first long run observed by CoRoT: LRc01, towards the galactic center in the direction of Aquila, which lasted from May to October 2007. <BR />Methods: we analyzed 3719 (33%) sources in the chromatic bands and 7689 in the monochromatic band. Instrumental noise and the stellar variability were treated with several detrending tools, on which subsequently several transit search algorithms were applied. <BR />Results: Forty two sources were classified as planetary transit candidates and up to now 26 cases have been solved. One planet (CoRoT-2b) and one brown-dwarf (CoRoT-3b) have been the subjects of detailed publications. The CoRoT space mission, launched on December 27 2006, was developed and is operated by CNES, with contributions from Austria, Belgium, Brazil, ESA, Germany and Spain. The first CoRoT data are available to the community from the CoRoT archive: http://idoc-corot.ias.u-psud.fr. [less ▲]

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See detailTW ;Hydrae: evidence of stellar spots instead of a Hot Jupiter
Huélamo, N.; Figueira, P.; Bonfils, X. et al

in Astronomy and Astrophysics (2008), 489

Context: TW Hya is a classical T Tauri star that shows significant radial-velocity variations in the optical regime. These variations have been attributed to a 10 M_Jup planet orbiting the star at 0.04 AU ... [more ▼]

Context: TW Hya is a classical T Tauri star that shows significant radial-velocity variations in the optical regime. These variations have been attributed to a 10 M_Jup planet orbiting the star at 0.04 AU. Aims: The aim of this letter is to confirm the presence of the giant planet around TW Hya by (i) testing whether the observed RV variations can be caused by stellar spots and (ii) analyzing new optical and infrared data to detect the signal of the planet companion. Methods: We fitted the RV variations of TW Hya using a cool spot model. In addition, we obtained new high-resolution optical & infrared spectra, together with optical photometry of TW Hya and compared them with previous data. Results: Our model shows that a cold spot covering 7% of the stellar surface and located at a latitude of 54° can reproduce the reported RV variations. The model also predicts a bisector semi-amplitude variation <10 m s[SUP]-1[/SUP], which is less than the errors of the RV measurements discussed in Setiawan et al. (2008, Nature, 451, 38). The analysis of our new optical RV data, with typical errors of 10 m s[SUP]-1[/SUP], shows a larger RV amplitude that varies depending on the correlation mask used. A slight correlation between the RV variation and the bisector is also observed although not at a very significant level. The infrared H-band RV curve is almost flat, showing a small variation (<35 m s[SUP]-1[/SUP]) that is not consistent with the published optical orbit. All these results support the spot scenario rather than the presence of a hot Jupiter. Finally, the photometric data shows a 20% (peak to peak) variability, which is much larger than the 4% variation expected for the modeled cool spot. The fact that the optical data are correlated with the surface of the cross-correlation function points towards hot spots as being responsible for the photometric variability. Conclusions: We conclude that the best explanation for the RV signal observed in TW Hya is the presence of a cool stellar spot and not an orbiting hot Jupiter. Based on observations taken at the VLT (Paranal), under programs 280.C-5064(A) and 075.C-0202(A), and with the CORALIE spectrograph and EulerCAM both at the Euler Swiss telescope (La Silla). [less ▲]

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