References of "Grotz, Catherine"
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See detailPRESSE: "Retirees leaving sociable workplaces may experience accelerated cognitive decline"
Grotz, Catherine ULiege

in BGS (Ed.) British Geriatrics Society: Improving Health Care for older people (2017)

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See detailOccupational social and mental stimulation and cognitive decline with advancing age
Grotz, Catherine ULiege; Meillon, Céline; Amieva, Hélène et al

in Age and Ageing (2017)

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See detailTable ronde : La formation continue chez les psychologues spécialisés en gérontologie : Pourquoi, pour quoi, par qui, quand et comment ?
Grotz, Catherine ULiege; Lagarde, Alexia; Stoykova, Ralitsa et al

Scientific conference (2017, June 30)

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See detail"Je suis retraité et heureux : un paradoxe?"
Grotz, Catherine ULiege; Schroyen, Sarah ULiege

Conference given outside the academic context (2017)

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See detailHow should proxies of Cognitive Reserve be evaluated in a population of healthy older adults?
Grotz, Catherine ULiege; Seron, Xavier; Van Wissen, Marie et al

in International Psychogeriatrics (2017), 29(1), 123-136

Background: While some tools have been developed to estimate an individual’s cognitive reserve (CR), no study has assessed the adequacy of the method used for assessing these CR proxy indicators ... [more ▼]

Background: While some tools have been developed to estimate an individual’s cognitive reserve (CR), no study has assessed the adequacy of the method used for assessing these CR proxy indicators. Therefore, we aimed to determine the most appropriate method to estimate CR by comparing two approaches: 1) the common assessment of CR proxies in the literature (e.g., years of education) and 2) the calculation of a comprehensive index based on most significant parameters used in the estimation of CR. Methods: Data on CR proxies: (i.e., education, occupation and leisure activities) were obtained in a sample of 204 older adults. Regression analyses were used to develop the two indices of CR (i.e., ICR-standard and ICR-detailed) and to determine which index best represented the level of one’s CR. Results: The ICR-standard was calculated using a combination of the three most common measures of reserve in the literature: number of schooling years, complexity of the primary occupation and amount of current participation in stimulating activities. The ICR-detailed was calculated using the most significant parameters (established in initial analyses) of CR: highest level of education combined with the number of training courses, last occupation and amount of current participation in social and intellectual activities. The comparison of both indices showed that higher levels of ICR-standard and ICR-detailed were associated with a greater minimization of the effects of age on cognition. However, the ICR-detailed was more strongly associated to this minimization than the ICR-standard, suggesting that the ICR-detailed best reflect one’s CR. Conclusion: This study is the first to show that it is of great importance to question methods measuring CR proxies in order to develop a clinical tool allowing a comprehensive and accurate estimation of CR. [less ▲]

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See detailEducation, Complexity of Work, and Incident Cognitive Impairment in Puerto Rican Older Adults
Andel, Ross; Luisa, Ana; Small, Brent et al

Poster (2016, November 18)

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See detailActivité professionnelle et santé cognitive des retraités : le rôle de la stimulation sociale et mentale
Grotz, Catherine ULiege; Adam, Stéphane ULiege; Meillon, céline et al

Poster (2016, September 20)

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See detailPsychological transition and adjustment processes related to retirement: Influence on cognitive functioning
Grotz, Catherine ULiege; Matharan, Fanny; Pérès, Karine et al

in Aging & Mental Health (2016), 21(12),

Objective: To investigate the relationship between psychological transition and adjustment to retirement and cognitive performances in older adults. Methods: The study’s sample was taken from the Approche ... [more ▼]

Objective: To investigate the relationship between psychological transition and adjustment to retirement and cognitive performances in older adults. Methods: The study’s sample was taken from the Approche Multidisciplinaire Int egr ee cohort, a French prospective study of retirees from agriculture, aged 65 and over, living in rural settings in southwestern France. The cross-sectional analyses were conducted on a sample of 590 elderly people without dementia at baseline and for whom information on perception of the work setting, experience of the retirement transition and adaptation to retirement life (nine variables) as well as neuropsychological measures (global cognitive functioning, episodic memory, verbal fluency, attention and psychomotor speed) were available at first visit. Results: Multivariable linear regression analyses, including nine variables related to retirement and adjusted for potential confounding factors, indicated that three of them positive consideration of former work situation, development of new activities during retirement and good adaptation to free time were associated with better cognitive performances. Conclusions: We found that several factors proved to be determinants of good cognitive functioning at retirement and could serve as a basis for the development of more efficient intervention programs aimed at helping retirees to maintain good cognitive functioning after retirement. [less ▲]

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See detailThe association of timing of retirement with cognitive performance in old age: The role of leisure activities after retirement
Ihle, Andreas; Grotz, Catherine ULiege; Adam, Stéphane ULiege et al

in International Psychogeriatrics (2016)

Background: The role of timing of retirement on cognitive functioning in old age is inconclusive so far. Therefore, the present study set out to investigate the association of timing of retirement with ... [more ▼]

Background: The role of timing of retirement on cognitive functioning in old age is inconclusive so far. Therefore, the present study set out to investigate the association of timing of retirement with cognitive performance and its interplay with key correlates of cognitive reserve in a large sample of older adults. Methods: Two thousand two hundred and sixty three older adults served as sample for the present study. Different psychometric tests (TMT A, TMT B, Mill Hill) were administered. In addition, individuals were interviewed on their retirement, occupation, educational attainment, and regarding 18 leisure activities that have been carried out after retirement. Results: Earlier retirement (compared to retirement at legal age) was significantly associated with better performance in the TMT A, the TMT B, and the Mill Hill vocabulary test. Moderation analyses showed that in individuals with a moderate number of leisure activities in old age, earlier retirement was related to better cognitive performance, but not in those with a relatively large number of leisure activities. Hierarchical regression analyses revealed that entering leisure activities as additional predictor significantly increased explained variance in the cognitive measures over and above all other investigated markers of cognitive reserve (i.e., occupation and education). Conclusions: Present data further corroborate the view that leisure activities even in old age may lead to further enrichment effects and thereby may be related to better cognitive functioning. The role of engaging in activities in the context of major life events such as retirement is discussed. [less ▲]

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See detailBRAIN PLASTICITY, COGNITIVE RESERVE AND AGING: AN INSIGHT FROM THE RETIREMENT PERSPECTIVE
Grotz, Catherine ULiege

Doctoral thesis (2016)

Summary Background: Aging would be associated with brain changes that have an impact on certain cognitive functions. However, there is a huge interindividual heterogeneity in age related cognitive decline ... [more ▼]

Summary Background: Aging would be associated with brain changes that have an impact on certain cognitive functions. However, there is a huge interindividual heterogeneity in age related cognitive decline. This variability may be explained by differences in cognitive reserve (CR), a very recent and complex concept which suggests that the central nervous system can maintain its optimal performance over a longer period of time in individuals with certain lifestyle characteristics, evolving in "enriched environments". Thus, the aim of the present thesis was to deepen our understanding of the relationship between activity and brain; in particular, we examined the role of a variable that decisively influences subjects’ level of activity: retirement. Studies: First, we have shown that people aged 60 and over may maintain their cognitive skills through the continuation of their professional and non-professional activities (European Share survey). A cross-country analysis also revealed that cognitive scores of older adults were better in countries in which the eligibility age for retirement benefits was higher (e.g., 65 years old in Sweden) as compared to those where it was lower (e.g., 60 years old in France), suggesting that people benefit from staying longer in employment. Then, we extended our work to the effect of retirement on pathological aging and, in particular, to Alzheimer's disease (AD). We used data collected from the Ictus cohort, a European study of AD patients. We showed that previous research suffered from a methodological bias that led to overestimate the effect of retirement age. After taking into account this bias, we showed that although there is an association between retirement age and onset of the disease, the strength of the link is reduced. These initial results highlight the need for cautiousness when studying such complex relationships and for prospective studies. Thus, we used longitudinal data from the 3 Cities, a French population-based study of older adults. This study revealed that even though deferred retirement is associated with a lower risk of dementia, a longer working life is not associated with such reduced risk. This indicates that the retirement age does not directly contribute to CR but rather that earlier retirement should be considered as a factor of cognitive and psycho-social vulnerability. In the fourth study, we identified psychosocial factors associated with retirement that may influence cognitive functioning using data from the AMI study, which is conducted in rural areas in southwestern France. We found that holding positive consideration towards work and the beneficial effect of activity after retirement favored better cognitive functioning. Finally, we have developed and compared two indices of CR measuring all life experiences (a standard and a detailed indices). This study revealed that while both indices were associated with a minimization of the effects of age on cognition, the detailed index seems to best reflects the level of one’s CR. Conclusion: Although later retirement age is associated with cognition, caution is needed, as the current evidence should not merely serve economic interests aiming to justify an increase in the retirement age. Indeed, one should not suggest, based on these initial results, that increasing the age of retirement would be beneficial for everyone’s health. On the contrary, research on retirement and cognition mostly underlines the importance of activity in a general sense, rather than being limited to the professional occupation. The retirement transition is a complex life event that should be viewed in light of the various individual and social factors that may influence cognitive functioning. A better understanding of retirement-related factors that contribute to cognitive vitality is necessary in order to optimize health policies and to ensure that they are well adjusted to the diverse professional and psychological issues affecting the older population. [less ▲]

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See detailRetirement and cognitive functioning: A tricky association
Grotz, Catherine ULiege; Adam, Stéphane ULiege

in Pachana, N.A. (Ed.) Encyclopedia of Geropsychology (2016)

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See detailRéserve Cognitive
Adam, Stéphane ULiege; Grotz, Catherine ULiege

in L’Encyclopaedia Universalis (2016)

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See detailLe Concept de Réserve Cognitive
Grotz, Catherine ULiege; Adam, Stéphane ULiege

in Amieva, Hélène; Bellin, Catherine; Maillet, Didier (Eds.) L’évaluation neuropsychologique : De la norme à l’exception (2016)

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See detailThe impact of factors related to retirement on cognitive functioning
Grotz, Catherine ULiege; Adam, Stéphane ULiege; Matharan, Fanny et al

in International Psychogeriatrics (2016), 27(supplement S1), 45-69

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See detailLe concept de réserve cognitive
Grotz, Catherine ULiege; Adam, Stéphane ULiege

Conference (2015, November 30)

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See detailWhy is later age at retirement beneficial for cognition? Results from a French population-based study
Grotz, Catherine ULiege; Meillon, Céline; Amieva, Hélène et al

in Journal of Nutrition, Health & Aging (2015), 20(5), 514-519

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