References of "Gremler, Dwayne"
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See detailThe Delivery of Bad News to Customers in Service Encounters: An Employee Perspective
Delcourt, Cécile ULiege; Gremler, Dwayne; Greer, Dominique

Conference (2017, June)

During service encounters, customer contact employees often need to deliver bad news: unexpected information contrary to the customer’s wellbeing. For example, technicians regularly tell customers that ... [more ▼]

During service encounters, customer contact employees often need to deliver bad news: unexpected information contrary to the customer’s wellbeing. For example, technicians regularly tell customers that none of the data on their computer hard drive can be retrieved, veterinarians often inform owners that a beloved pet has cancer and cannot be cured, and airline staff regularly tell travelers that their flights have been cancelled due to bad weather. For some customer-contact employees, delivering bad news is an unavoidable, delicate, and emotionally-charged task that occurs regularly. Disclosing bad news can be highly stressful and perhaps detrimental for (1) customers, (2) customer- contact employees, and (3) service firms in general. Accordingly, it is crucial for service organizations to better understand bad news encounters (i.e., situations during which customer contact employees must deliver negative information) to better equip their managers and employees to deliver such news to customers. The topic of how to best deliver bad news has been broached in various disciplines, including the medical literature (e.g., Baile et al. 2000, 2002; Rosenbaum et al. 2004), the management literature (e.g., Bies 2013; Kothari, Shu, and Wysocki 2009), and the sociology literature (e.g., Clark and LaBeff 1986). These literatures have (1) examined the attitudes and emotions of the discloser of extreme bad news in very specific contexts, (2) identified the tactics used by disclosers, and (3) developed protocols for delivering extremely negative information. Surprisingly, studies of bad news delivered by contact employees are scarce in service research. Service failure and service recovery have received much attention, but this literature has two major gaps when it comes to understanding the delivery of negative information. First, service recovery research generally skips over the initial part of the process where employees first communicate bad news to customers, and instead focuses primarily on the process involved to resolve the situation. Second, there are many situations in which employees must deliver negative information to customers where it is clear that a service failure has not occurred (e.g., informing a customer that his 30-year old dishwasher is beyond repair). We use the critical incident technique (CIT) (Flanagan 1954; Gremler 2004) to analyze 200 incidents where service employees from a wide range of service sectors had to deliver bad news to a customer. [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 130 (4 ULiège)
See detailI Am Very Sorry Sir! Breaking Bad News to Customers
Delcourt, Cécile ULiege; Gremler, Dwayne; Greer, Dominique

Scientific conference (2017, February 25)

Detailed reference viewed: 31 (2 ULiège)
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See detailAn Analysis of the Interaction Effect between Employee Technical and Emotional Competencies in Emotionally Charged Service Encounters
Delcourt, Cécile ULiege; Gremler, Dwayne; De Zanet, Fabrice ULiege et al

in Journal of Service Management (2017), 28(1), 85-106

Purpose—Customers often experience negative emotions during service experiences. The ways that employees manage customers’ emotions and impressions about whether the service provider is concerned for them ... [more ▼]

Purpose—Customers often experience negative emotions during service experiences. The ways that employees manage customers’ emotions and impressions about whether the service provider is concerned for them in such emotionally charged service encounters (ECSEs) is crucial, considering the criticality of the encounter. Drawing on cognitive appraisal theory, this study proposes that two key competencies—employee emotional competence (EEC) and employee technical competence (ETC)—affect negative customer emotions and customer satisfaction with employee response in ECSEs. Design/methodology—This study relies on a video-based experiment that depicts a customer involved in an ECSE as a service provider delivers bad news to him. The hypothesis tests use a two-way independent analysis of covariance. Results—Both emotional and technical competencies must be displayed to improve the customer experience in an ECSE. When EEC is low, ETC does not decrease negative customer emotions or increase customer satisfaction with employee response. When EEC is high, ETC instead has a significant impact on both customer outcomes. Practical implications—Managers must train employees to develop both technical and emotional competencies. Employees who demonstrate only one type cannot temper customers’ emotions or enhance their perceptions of the employees’ response as well as can those strong in both competencies. Originality/value—Using a video-based experiment, this study examines the moderating role of EEC in the relationship between ETC and two key aspects of the customer experience in an ECSE (negative customer emotions and customer satisfaction with employee responses) following the delivery of bad news. [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 245 (21 ULiège)
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See detailDelivering Bad News to Customers: An Employee Perspective
Delcourt, Cécile ULiege; Gremler, Dwayne; Greer, Dominique

Conference (2016, June)

Detailed reference viewed: 61 (4 ULiège)
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See detailI Am Very Sorry Sir! Breaking Bad News to Customers
Delcourt, Cécile ULiege; GREMLER, Dwayne; GREER, Dominique

Conference (2016, May 31)

Detailed reference viewed: 36 (2 ULiège)
See detailBad News in Service Encounters: Ideas and Insights
Delcourt, Cécile ULiege; Gremler, Dwayne

Conference (2016, March)

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See detailEmployee Emotional Competence: Construct Conceptualization and Validation of a Customer-Based Measure
Delcourt, Cécile ULiege; Gremler, Dwayne; van Riel, Allard et al

in Journal of Service Research (2016), 19(1), 72-87

Customers often experience intense emotions during service encounters. Their perceptions of how well contact employees demonstrate emotional competence in emotionally charged service encounters can affect ... [more ▼]

Customers often experience intense emotions during service encounters. Their perceptions of how well contact employees demonstrate emotional competence in emotionally charged service encounters can affect their service evaluations and loyalty intentions. Previous studies examining employees’ potential to behave in emotionally competent ways (i.e., employee emotional intelligence [EEI]) have used self- or supervisor-reported scales to predict customer outcomes, presenting EEI as stable and independent of the context. However, service firms should be more concerned with the actual display of emotionally competent behaviors by employees (employee emotional competence [EEC]), because employee behaviors vary across encounters. Moreover, a customer perspective of EEC is useful as customer perceptions of employee performance are crucial predictors of satisfaction and loyalty. Therefore, this study proposes a conceptualization and operationalization of EEC in a service encounter context. On the basis of a comprehensive literature review and in-depth interviews, the authors develop a scale to capture customer-perceived EEC, defined as an employee’s competence in perceiving, understanding, and regulating customer emotions during a discrete service encounter. The scale achieves good reliability and validity. Researchers can use it to explore the role of EEC in service contexts; managers can employ the scale to diagnose EEC and improve customers’ service encounter experiences. [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 219 (14 ULiège)
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See detailEmployee Emotional Competence: Its Nature, Importance, and Implications
Delcourt, Cécile ULiege; Gremler, Dwayne; van Riel, Allard et al

Conference (2015)

Detailed reference viewed: 82 (0 ULiège)
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See detailA Typology of Customer-Perceived Bad News in Service Encounters
Delcourt, Cécile ULiege; Gremler, Dwayne; van Riel, Allard et al

Conference (2015)

Detailed reference viewed: 60 (5 ULiège)
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See detailDelivering Bad New in Service Encounters: a Customer Perspective
Delcourt, Cécile ULiege; Gremler, Dwayne; van Riel, Allard et al

Conference (2014, June)

Detailed reference viewed: 25 (1 ULiège)
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See detailEffects of perceived employee emotional competence on customer satisfaction and loyalty: The mediating role of rapport
Delcourt, Cécile ULiege; Gremler, Dwayne; van Riel, Allard et al

in Journal of Service Management (2013), 24(1), 5-24

Purpose – During service encounters, emotionally competent employees are likely to succeed in building rapport with their customers, which in turn leads to customer satisfaction and loyalty. However, the ... [more ▼]

Purpose – During service encounters, emotionally competent employees are likely to succeed in building rapport with their customers, which in turn leads to customer satisfaction and loyalty. However, the relationship between emotional competence and rapport has not been empirically examined. In the present study, we investigate effects of customer perceived employee emotional competence (EEC) on satisfaction and loyalty. We also examine how and to what extent rapport mediates these effects. Design/methodology/approach – Drawing on the theory of affect-as-information, suggesting that emotions inform human behavior, we develop a structural model and test it on a sample of 247 customers in a personal service setting. Findings – Customer perceptions of EEC positively influence customer satisfaction and loyalty. Rapport partially mediates both effects. Practical implications – The extent to which customers perceive employees as emotionally competent is strongly correlated with the development of rapport, customer satisfaction, and loyalty. Managers of high-contact services should therefore pay attention to emotional competence when hiring new employees, and/or encourage and train existing employees to develop this type of competence. Originality/value – Previous studies have used employee self-reports or supervisor reports of EEC, essentially capturing an employee’s potential to behave in an emotionally competent way. We extend emotional competence theories with a customer perspective: the present study is the first to capture customer perceptions of employees’ emotional competence. [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 344 (22 ULiège)
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See detailTwo Decades of Service Marketing Research: Mapping the New Frontiers of the Discipline
Furrer, Olivier; Delcourt, Cécile ULiege; Gremler, Dwayne

Conference (2013)

Detailed reference viewed: 48 (3 ULiège)
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See detailSorry Sir, Your Flight has been Cancelled! The Role of Employee Competencies in Emotionally Charged Service Encounters
Delcourt, Cécile ULiege; Gremler, Dwayne; Van Riel, Allard et al

Conference (2012)

Detailed reference viewed: 26 (0 ULiège)
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See detailDelivering bad news to customers: The role of employee emotional and technical competences
Delcourt, Cécile ULiege; Van Riel, Allard ULiege; van Birgelen, Marcel et al

Conference (2011, July)

Detailed reference viewed: 45 (9 ULiège)
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See detailThe emotional competence of service contact employees. Effects on rapport, customer satisfaction and loyalty
Delcourt, Cécile ULiege; Van Riel, Allard ULiege; van Birgelen, Marcel et al

Conference (2011, May)

Detailed reference viewed: 155 (10 ULiège)
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See detailEMOCOMP! A customer based scale for measuring emotional competences in service employees
Delcourt, Cécile ULiege; Van Riel, Allard ULiege; van Birgelen, Marcel et al

E-print/Working paper (2010)

Detailed reference viewed: 42 (1 ULiège)