References of "Gosseries, Olivia"
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See detailDisorders of consciousness: new advances in neuroimaging techniques
Soddu, Andrea ULiege; Bruno, Marie-Aurélie ULiege; VANHAUDENHUYSE, Audrey ULiege et al

in Zanotti, Bruno (Ed.) Vegetative State (in press)

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See detail2 Years outcome of patients in unresponsive wakefulness syndrome/vegetative state and minimally conscious state
Cassol, Helena ULiege; LEDOUX, Didier ULiege; Thibaut, Aurore ULiege et al

Poster (2017, March)

INTRODUCTION: Following severe acute brain damage, patients typically evolve from coma to an unresponsive wakefulness syndrome/vegetative state (UWS/VS; wakefulness without awareness) and later to a ... [more ▼]

INTRODUCTION: Following severe acute brain damage, patients typically evolve from coma to an unresponsive wakefulness syndrome/vegetative state (UWS/VS; wakefulness without awareness) and later to a minimally conscious state (MCS; fluctuating but consistent nonreflex behaviors). MCS is subcategorized in MCS+ (i.e., command following) and MCS- (i.e., visual pursuit, localization of noxious stimulation or contingent behaviours). Reliable and consistent interactive communication and/or functional use of objects indicate the next boundary – emergence from MCS (EMCS). To date, there is still no reliable predictive model of recovery from the UWS/VS and the MCS. A better understanding of patients' outcome would help in decisions regarding patients’ care and rehabilitation, as well as end-of-life decisions. METHODS: We collected demographic information, acute care history and longitudinal follow-up of patients in UWS/VS and MCS admitted in 15 expert centers in Belgium (via the Belgian Federal Public Service Health). Patients were evaluated at 1, 3, 6, 12 and 24 months post injury with the Coma Recovery Scale-Revised and the diagnosis was based on internationally accepted criteria of UWS/VS, MCS or EMCS. Results were considered significant at p<0.001. RESULTS: 24 months follow-up was available for 476 patients including 261 diagnosed in UWS/VS (88 traumatic, 173 non-traumatic) and 215 diagnosed in MCS (80 traumatic, 135 non-traumatic) one month after the injury. Patients who were in MCS one month after the insult were more likely to recover functional communication or object use after 24 months than patients in UWS/VS. Moreover, functional recovery occurred more often in MCS+ (79%) as compared to MCS- (29%), and mortality rate was more important in MCS- patients (68%) as compared to MCS+ (21%). Comparisons within UWS/VS and MCS groups based on etiology showed that traumatic patients had a better outcome at 24 months than non-traumatic patients. Among non-traumatic patients, no difference was found between anoxic patients and patients with other etiologies regarding functional recovery. CONCLUSION: Our study highlights that the outcome is significantly better for patients who are in MCS one month post-injury as compared to patients who remain in UWS/VS at that time. Concerning MCS patients, the outcome is significantly better for patients who are MCS+ one month post-injury as compared to patients who are MCS- at that time. This study also confirms that patients with traumatic etiology have better prognosis than patients with non-traumatic causes. [less ▲]

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See detailFeasibility of Oral Feeding in Patients with Disorders of Consciousness
MAUDOUX, Audrey ULiege; Breuskin, I; Gosseries, Olivia ULiege et al

in Schnakers, C; LAUREYS, Steven (Eds.) Coma and Disorders of Consciousness, Second Edition (2017)

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See detailCognitive functioning and multimodal neuroimaging interactions in patients with disorders of consciousness
Aubinet, Charlène ULiege; Murphy, Lesley; Gosseries, Olivia ULiege et al

in Journal of the International Neuropsychological Society (2017)

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See detailSedation of Patients With Disorders of Consciousness During Neuroimaging: Effects on Resting State Functional Brain Connectivity.
KIRSCH, Murielle ULiege; Guldenmund, Pieter; Bahri, Mohamed Ali ULiege et al

in Anesthesia and Analgesia (2017), 124(2),

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See detailPrevalence of coma-recovery scale-revised signs of consciousness in patients in minimally conscious state
Wannez, Sarah ULiege; Gosseries, Olivia ULiege; Azzolini, Deborah et al

in Neuropsychological Rehabilitation (2017)

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See detailTracking dynamic interactions between structural and functional connectivity: a TMS/EEG-dMRI study
Amico, Enrico; Bodart, Olivier ULiege; Rosanova, Mario et al

in Brain connectivity (2017)

Transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS) in combination with neuroimaging techniques allows to measure the effects of a direct perturbation of the brain. When coupled to high density electroencephalography ... [more ▼]

Transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS) in combination with neuroimaging techniques allows to measure the effects of a direct perturbation of the brain. When coupled to high density electroencephalography (TMS/hd-EEG), TMS pulses revealed electrophysiological signatures of different cortical modules in health and disease. However, the neural underpinnings of these signatures remain unclear. Here, by applying multimodal analyses of cortical response to TMS recordings and diffusion magnetic resonance imaging (dMRI) tractography, we investigated the relationship between functional and structural features of different cortical modules in a cohort of awake healthy volunteers. For each subject we computed directed functional connectivity interactions between cortical areas from the source reconstructed TMS/hd- EEG recordings and correlated them with the correspondent structural connectivity matrix extracted from dMRI tractography, in three different frequency bands (alpha, beta, gamma) and two sites of stimulation (left precuneus and left premotor). Each stimulated area appeared to mainly respond to TMS by being functionally elicited in specific frequency bands, i.e. beta for precuneus and gamma for premotor. We also observed a temporary decrease in the whole-brain correlation between directed functional connectivity and structural connectivity after TMS in all frequency bands. Notably, when focusing on the stimulated areas only, we found that the structurefunction correlation significantly increases over time in the premotor area contralateral to TMS. Our study points out the importance of taking into account the major role played by different cortical oscillations when investigating the mechanisms for integration and segregation of information in the human brain. [less ▲]

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See detailGlobal disorders of consciousness.
Stender, Johan; Laureys, Steven ULiege; Gosseries, Olivia ULiege

in Velmans, Max; Schneider, Susan (Eds.) The Blackwell Companion to Consciousness (2017)

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See detailTranscranial magnetic stimulation in sleep consciousness
Gosseries, Olivia ULiege; Niemienen, Jaakko; Jason, Samaha et al

Poster (2016, June)

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See detailRepeated Behavioral Assessments in Patients with Disorders of Consciousness
Wannez, Sarah ULiege; Annen, Jitka ULiege; Aubinet, Charlène ULiege et al

Conference (2016, March 04)

The Coma Recovery Scale Revised (CRS-R) is considered as the most sensitive scale to assess patients with disorders of consciousness (DOC). Guidelines recommend repeated assessments because patients might ... [more ▼]

The Coma Recovery Scale Revised (CRS-R) is considered as the most sensitive scale to assess patients with disorders of consciousness (DOC). Guidelines recommend repeated assessments because patients might suffer from consciousness fluctuations, but it is not specified how many assessments are needed. The present study included 131 patients with DOC. They have been assessed at least 6 times during a 14-days period with the CRS-R. Results show that 5 CRS-R assessments are needed to reach a reliable diagnosis, and that all the CRS-R subscales are influenced by consciousness fluctuations. We here showed that consciousness fluctuations influence the behavioral diagnosis, and that 5 assessments within a short period of time are needed to get a reliable clinical diagnosis. [less ▲]

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See detailDisorders of Consciousness
Bodart, Olivier ULiege; Thibaut, Aurore ULiege; Laureys, Steven ULiege et al

in Citerio, G.; Smith, M.; Kofke, A. (Eds.) Oxford Textbook of neurocritical care (2016)

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See detailStratification of unresponsive patients by an independently validated index of brain complexity
Casarotto, Silvia; Commanducci, Angel; Rosanova, Mario et al

in Annals of Neurology (2016), 80(5),

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See detailControlled clinical trial of repeated left prefrontal transcranial direct current stimulation in patients with chronic minimally conscious state
Martial, Charlotte ULiege; Thibaut, Aurore ULiege; Wannez, Sarah ULiege et al

Poster (2015, June)

A recent study showed that single-session anodal transcranial direct current stimulation (tDCS) applied to the left dorsolateral prefrontal cortex (LDLPF) transiently improves consciousness in 43% of ... [more ▼]

A recent study showed that single-session anodal transcranial direct current stimulation (tDCS) applied to the left dorsolateral prefrontal cortex (LDLPF) transiently improves consciousness in 43% of patients in minimally conscious state (MCS) (Thibaut et al., 2014). We here test the potential effects and safety of repeated tDCS in severely brain-damaged patients with MCS. In this double-blind cross-over sham-controlled experimental design, we delivered two sessions of repeated (5 days of stimulation) tDCS, either anodal or sham in a randomized order. We stimulated the LDLPF cortex during twenty minutes in 20 MCS patients (12 men, aged 48±16 years, time since onset 78±95 months, 12 post-traumatic). Consciousness was assessed by the French adaptation of the Coma Recovery Scale Revised (CRS-R; Schnakers et al., 2008) before and after each stimulation. A treatment effect was observed for the comparison between CRS-R total scores at baseline and after 5 days of real tDCS (p<0.01). Behaviorally, 10/20 patients showed a tDCS-related improvement; 5 patients responded after the first stimulation and 5 other patients responded after 2, 3 or 4 days of stimulation. No side effect (e.g. epilepsy) was reported. Our results demonstrate that repeated (5 days) anodal LDLPF tDCS is safe and might improve signs of consciousness in about half of patients in MCS. It is important to note that the first session is not predictive for a future positive effect of the efficacy of the non-invasive electrical stimulation. [less ▲]

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See detailCortical responses to transcranial magnetic stimulation during Non-Rapid Eye Movement Sleep
Gosseries, Olivia ULiege; Jaakko, Nieminen; Siclari, Francesca et al

Poster (2015, March)

Transcranial magnetic stimulation coupled to high-density electroencephalography (TMS-EEG) allows for directly and non-invasively stimulating the brain and recording the subsequent cortical response ... [more ▼]

Transcranial magnetic stimulation coupled to high-density electroencephalography (TMS-EEG) allows for directly and non-invasively stimulating the brain and recording the subsequent cortical response. Previous TMS-EEG studies have shown clear-cut differences between conscious and unconscious conditions. When subjects are unconscious, as in non-rapid eye movement (NREM) sleep early in the night (stage N3), anesthesia or coma, TMS typically triggers a stereotypical and local slow-wave response. When they are conscious, as in normal wakefulness and rapid eye movement sleep (REM) sleep, brain responses to TMS are long-lasting, widespread, complex, and differentiated. In this study, we performed TMS-EEG during NREM sleep in stage 2 (N2) and N3 on 7 healthy participants. Brain activity was recorded using a 60-channel TMS-compatible EEG and single-pulse TMS was applied (up to 285 pulses per session) on the superior parietal cortex. After each TMS session (5 to 15 sessions per night), subjects were awakened to ask for a dream report. TMS-EEG responses were analyzed using the global mean field amplitude (GMFA), the perturbational complexity index (PCI), as well as time-frequency measures. Our results show that the TMS-EEG response during N3 is larger and slower than during N2 sleep. The GMFA is higher and PCI is lower in N3 as compared to N2 sleep. Moreover, N3 recordings showed activation at lower frequency bands after TMS as compared to N2 sleep. Additionally, TMS-EEG responses vary depending on whether subjects do or do not report a dream. TMS-EEG might provide valuable information for characterizing neurophysiological fluctuations and levels of consciousness within NREM sleep. [less ▲]

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See detailTranscranial magnetic stimulation and electroencephalography
Gosseries, Olivia ULiege; Bodart, Olivier ULiege; massimini, Marcello

in Rossetti, Andrea; Laureys, Steven (Eds.) Clinical Neurophysiology in Disorders of Consciousness: Brain monitoring in the ICU and Beyond (2015)

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