References of "Gosseries, Olivia"
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See detailFeasibility of Oral Feeding in Patients with Disorders of Consciousness
MAUDOUX, Audrey ULg; Breuskin, I; Gosseries, Olivia ULg et al

in Schnakers, C; LAUREYS, Steven (Eds.) Coma and Disorders of Consciousness, Second Edition (in press)

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See detailDisorders of consciousness: new advances in neuroimaging techniques
Soddu, Andrea ULg; Bruno, Marie-Aurélie ULg; VANHAUDENHUYSE, Audrey ULg et al

in Zanotti, Bruno (Ed.) Vegetative State (in press)

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See detailSedation of Patients With Disorders of Consciousness During Neuroimaging: Effects on Resting State Functional Brain Connectivity.
KIRSCH, Murielle ULg; Guldenmund, P; Ali Bahri, Mohamed et al

in Anesthesia and Analgesia (2017), 124(2),

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See detailGlobal disorders of consciousness.
Stender, Johan; Laureys, Steven ULg; Gosseries, Olivia ULg

in Velmans, Max; Schneider, Susan (Eds.) The Blackwell Companion to Consciousness (2017)

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See detailTranscranial magnetic stimulation in sleep consciousness
Gosseries, Olivia ULg; Niemienen, Jaakko; Jason, Samaha et al

Poster (2016, June)

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See detailRepeated Behavioral Assessments in Patients with Disorders of Consciousness
Wannez, Sarah ULg; Annen, Jitka ULg; Aubinet, Charlène ULg et al

Conference (2016, March 04)

The Coma Recovery Scale Revised (CRS-R) is considered as the most sensitive scale to assess patients with disorders of consciousness (DOC). Guidelines recommend repeated assessments because patients might ... [more ▼]

The Coma Recovery Scale Revised (CRS-R) is considered as the most sensitive scale to assess patients with disorders of consciousness (DOC). Guidelines recommend repeated assessments because patients might suffer from consciousness fluctuations, but it is not specified how many assessments are needed. The present study included 131 patients with DOC. They have been assessed at least 6 times during a 14-days period with the CRS-R. Results show that 5 CRS-R assessments are needed to reach a reliable diagnosis, and that all the CRS-R subscales are influenced by consciousness fluctuations. We here showed that consciousness fluctuations influence the behavioral diagnosis, and that 5 assessments within a short period of time are needed to get a reliable clinical diagnosis. [less ▲]

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See detailDisorders of Consciousness
Bodart, Olivier ULg; Thibaut, Aurore ULg; Laureys, Steven ULg et al

in Citerio, G.; Smith, M.; Kofke, A. (Eds.) Oxford Textbook of neurocritical care (2016)

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See detailControlled clinical trial of repeated left prefrontal transcranial direct current stimulation in patients with chronic minimally conscious state
Martial, Charlotte ULg; Thibaut, Aurore ULg; Wannez, Sarah ULg et al

Poster (2015, June)

A recent study showed that single-session anodal transcranial direct current stimulation (tDCS) applied to the left dorsolateral prefrontal cortex (LDLPF) transiently improves consciousness in 43% of ... [more ▼]

A recent study showed that single-session anodal transcranial direct current stimulation (tDCS) applied to the left dorsolateral prefrontal cortex (LDLPF) transiently improves consciousness in 43% of patients in minimally conscious state (MCS) (Thibaut et al., 2014). We here test the potential effects and safety of repeated tDCS in severely brain-damaged patients with MCS. In this double-blind cross-over sham-controlled experimental design, we delivered two sessions of repeated (5 days of stimulation) tDCS, either anodal or sham in a randomized order. We stimulated the LDLPF cortex during twenty minutes in 20 MCS patients (12 men, aged 48±16 years, time since onset 78±95 months, 12 post-traumatic). Consciousness was assessed by the French adaptation of the Coma Recovery Scale Revised (CRS-R; Schnakers et al., 2008) before and after each stimulation. A treatment effect was observed for the comparison between CRS-R total scores at baseline and after 5 days of real tDCS (p<0.01). Behaviorally, 10/20 patients showed a tDCS-related improvement; 5 patients responded after the first stimulation and 5 other patients responded after 2, 3 or 4 days of stimulation. No side effect (e.g. epilepsy) was reported. Our results demonstrate that repeated (5 days) anodal LDLPF tDCS is safe and might improve signs of consciousness in about half of patients in MCS. It is important to note that the first session is not predictive for a future positive effect of the efficacy of the non-invasive electrical stimulation. [less ▲]

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See detailCortical responses to transcranial magnetic stimulation during Non-Rapid Eye Movement Sleep
Gosseries, Olivia ULg; Jaakko, Nieminen; Siclari, Francesca et al

Poster (2015, March)

Transcranial magnetic stimulation coupled to high-density electroencephalography (TMS-EEG) allows for directly and non-invasively stimulating the brain and recording the subsequent cortical response ... [more ▼]

Transcranial magnetic stimulation coupled to high-density electroencephalography (TMS-EEG) allows for directly and non-invasively stimulating the brain and recording the subsequent cortical response. Previous TMS-EEG studies have shown clear-cut differences between conscious and unconscious conditions. When subjects are unconscious, as in non-rapid eye movement (NREM) sleep early in the night (stage N3), anesthesia or coma, TMS typically triggers a stereotypical and local slow-wave response. When they are conscious, as in normal wakefulness and rapid eye movement sleep (REM) sleep, brain responses to TMS are long-lasting, widespread, complex, and differentiated. In this study, we performed TMS-EEG during NREM sleep in stage 2 (N2) and N3 on 7 healthy participants. Brain activity was recorded using a 60-channel TMS-compatible EEG and single-pulse TMS was applied (up to 285 pulses per session) on the superior parietal cortex. After each TMS session (5 to 15 sessions per night), subjects were awakened to ask for a dream report. TMS-EEG responses were analyzed using the global mean field amplitude (GMFA), the perturbational complexity index (PCI), as well as time-frequency measures. Our results show that the TMS-EEG response during N3 is larger and slower than during N2 sleep. The GMFA is higher and PCI is lower in N3 as compared to N2 sleep. Moreover, N3 recordings showed activation at lower frequency bands after TMS as compared to N2 sleep. Additionally, TMS-EEG responses vary depending on whether subjects do or do not report a dream. TMS-EEG might provide valuable information for characterizing neurophysiological fluctuations and levels of consciousness within NREM sleep. [less ▲]

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See detailTranscranial magnetic stimulation and electroencephalography
Gosseries, Olivia ULg; Bodart, Olivier ULg; massimini, Marcello

in Rossetti, Andrea; Laureys, Steven (Eds.) Clinical Neurophysiology in Disorders of Consciousness: Brain monitoring in the ICU and Beyond (2015)

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See detailBeyond the gaze: Communicating in chronic locked-in syndrome
Lugo, Z.R; Bruno, Marie-Aurelie; Gosseries, Olivia ULg et al

in Brain Injury (2015), 29

OBJECTIVE Locked-in syndrome (LIS) usually follows a brainstem stroke and is characterized by paralysis of all voluntary muscles (except eyes' movements or blinking) and lack of speech with preserved ... [more ▼]

OBJECTIVE Locked-in syndrome (LIS) usually follows a brainstem stroke and is characterized by paralysis of all voluntary muscles (except eyes' movements or blinking) and lack of speech with preserved consciousness. Several tools have been developed to promote communication with these patients. The aim of the study was to evaluate the current status regarding communication in a cohort of LIS patients. DESIGN A survey was conducted in collaboration with the French Association of Locked-in syndrome (ALIS). SUBJECTS AND METHODS Two hundred and four patients, members of ALIS, were invited to fill in a questionnaire on communication issues and clinical evolution (recovery of verbal language and movements, presence of visual and/or auditory deficits). RESULTS Eighty-eight responses were processed. All respondents (35% female, mean age = 52 ± 12 years, mean time in LIS = 10 ± 6 years) reported using a yes/no communication code using mainly eyes' movements and 62% used assisting technology; 49% could communicate through verbal language and 73% have recovered some functional movements within the years. CONCLUSION The results highlight the possibility to recover non-eye dependent communication, speech production and some functional movement in the majority of chronic LIS patients. [less ▲]

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See detailConsciousness: And Disorders of Consciousness
Heine, Lizette ULg; Demertzi, Athina ULg; Laureys, Steven ULg et al

in Toga, Arthur W (Ed.) Brain mapping : an encyclopedic reference (2015)

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See detailConsciousness and complexity during unresponsiveness induced by propofol, xenon, and ketamine
Sarasso, S.; Boly, M.; Napolitani, M. et al

in Current Biology (2015), 25(23), 3099-3105

A common endpoint of general anesthetics is behavioral unresponsiveness [1], which is commonly associated with loss of consciousness. However, subjects can become disconnected from the environment while ... [more ▼]

A common endpoint of general anesthetics is behavioral unresponsiveness [1], which is commonly associated with loss of consciousness. However, subjects can become disconnected from the environment while still having conscious experiences, as demonstrated by sleep states associated with dreaming [2]. Among anesthetics, ketamine is remarkable [3] in that it induces profound unresponsiveness, but subjects often report ketamine dreams upon emergence from anesthesia [4-9]. Here, we aimed at assessing consciousness during anesthesia with propofol, xenon, and ketamine, independent of behavioral responsiveness. To do so, in 18 healthy volunteers, we measured the complexity of the cortical response to transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS) - an approach that has proven helpful in assessing objectively the level of consciousness irrespective of sensory processing and motor responses [10]. In addition, upon emergence from anesthesia, we collected reports about conscious experiences during unresponsiveness. Both frontal and parietal TMS elicited a low-amplitude electroencephalographic (EEG) slow wave corresponding to a local pattern of cortical activation with low complexity during propofol anesthesia, a high-amplitude EEG slow wave corresponding to a global, stereotypical pattern of cortical activation with low complexity during xenon anesthesia, and a wakefulness-like, complex spatiotemporal activation pattern during ketamine anesthesia. Crucially, participants reported no conscious experience after emergence from propofol and xenon anesthesia, whereas after ketamine they reported long, vivid dreams unrelated to the external environment. These results are relevant because they suggest that brain complexity may be sensitive to the presence of disconnected consciousness in subjects who are considered unconscious based on behavioral responses. © 2015 Elsevier Ltd All rights reserved. [less ▲]

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See detailThalamic volume as a biomarker for Disorders Of Consciousness. Progress in Biomedical Optics and Imaging
Rubeaux, M; Mahalingam, J; Gomez, F et al

in Proceedings of SPIE (2015)

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See detailTranscranial magnetic stimulation combined with high density EEG in altered states of consciousness
Napolitani, M.; Bodart, Olivier ULg; Canali, P. et al

in Brain injury : [BI] (2014), 28(9), 1180-1189

Background: This review discusses the advantages of transcranial magnetic stimulation combined with high-density electroencephalography (TMS-hdEEG) over other current techniques of brain imaging. Methods ... [more ▼]

Background: This review discusses the advantages of transcranial magnetic stimulation combined with high-density electroencephalography (TMS-hdEEG) over other current techniques of brain imaging. Methods and results: Its application was reviewed, focusing particularly on disorders of consciousness, in the perspective of recent theories of consciousness. Assessment of non-communicative patients with disorders of consciousness remains a clinical challenge and objective measures of the level of consciousness are still needed. Current theories suggest that a key requirement for consciousness is the brain’s capacity to rapidly integrate information across different specialized cortical areas. TMS-EEG allows the stimulation of any given cortical area and the recording of the immediate electrical cortical response. This technique has recently been successfully employed to measure changes in brain complexity under physiological, pharmacological and pathological conditions. Conclusions: This suggests that TMS-EEG is a reliable tool to discriminate between conscious and unconscious patients at the single subject level. Future works are needed to validate and implement this technique as a clinical tool. [less ▲]

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