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See detailPlanetary transit candidates in the CoRoT LRa01 field
Carone, L.; Gandolfi, D.; Cabrera, J. et al

in Astronomy and Astrophysics (2012), 538

Context: CoRoT is a pioneering space mission whose primary goals are stellar seismology and extrasolar planets search. Its surveys of large stellar fields generate numerous planetary candidates whose ... [more ▼]

Context: CoRoT is a pioneering space mission whose primary goals are stellar seismology and extrasolar planets search. Its surveys of large stellar fields generate numerous planetary candidates whose lightcurves have transit-like features. An extensive analytical and observational follow-up effort is undertaken to classify these candidates. Aims: The list of planetary transit candidates from the CoRoT LRa01 star field in the Monoceros constellation towards the Galactic anti-center is presented. The CoRoT observations of LRa01 lasted from 24 October 2007 to 3 March 2008. Methods: 7470 chromatic and 3938 monochromatic lightcurves were acquired and analysed. Instrumental noise and stellar variability were treated with several filtering tools by different teams from the CoRoT community. Different transit search algorithms were applied to the lightcurves. Results: Fifty-one stars were classified as planetary transit candidates in LRa01. Thirty-seven (i.e., 73 % of all candidates) are "good" planetary candidates based on photometric analysis only. Thirty-two (i.e., 87 % of the "good" candidates) have been followed-up. At the time of this writing twenty-two cases have been solved and five planets have been discovered: three transiting hot-Jupiters (CoRoT-5b, CoRoT-12b, and CoRoT-21b), the first terrestrial transiting planet (CoRoT-7b), and another planet in the same system (CoRoT-7c, detected by radial velocity survey only). Evidences of another non-transiting planet in the CoRoT-7 system, namely CoRoT-7d, have been recently found. [less ▲]

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See detailExoplanet discoveries with the CoRoT space observatory
Lammer, H.; Dvorak, R.; Deleuil, M. et al

in Solar System Research (2010), 44

The CoRoT space observatory is a project which is led by the French space agency CNES and leading space research institutes in Austria, Brazil, Belgium, Germany and Spain and also the European Space ... [more ▼]

The CoRoT space observatory is a project which is led by the French space agency CNES and leading space research institutes in Austria, Brazil, Belgium, Germany and Spain and also the European Space Agency ESA. CoRoT observed since its launch in December 27, 2006 about 100 000 stars for the exoplanet channel, during 150 days uninterrupted high-precision photometry. Since the The CoRoT-team has several exoplanet candidates which are currently analyzed under its study, we report here the discoveries of nine exoplanets which were observed by CoRoT. Discovered exoplanets such as CoRoT-3b populate the brown dwarf desert and close the gap of measured physical properties between usual gas giants and very low mass stars. CoRoT discoveries extended the known range of planet masses down to about 4.8 Earth-masses (CoRoT-7b) and up to 21 Jupiter masses (CoRoT-3b), the radii to about 1.68 × 0.09 R [SUB]Earth[/SUB] (CoRoT-7b) and up to the most inflated hot Jupiter with 1.49 × 0.09 R [SUB]Earth[/SUB] found so far (CoRoT-1b), and the transiting exoplanet with the longest period of 95.274 days (CoRoT-9b). Giant exoplanets have been detected at low metallicity, rapidly rotating and active, spotted stars. Two CoRoT planets have host stars with the lowest content of heavy elements known to show a transit hinting towards a different planethost-star-metallicity relation then the one found by radial-velocity search programs. Finally the properties of the CoRoT-7b prove that rocky planets with a density close to Earth exist outside the Solar System. Finally the detection of the secondary transit of CoRoT-1b at a sensitivity level of 10[SUP]-5[/SUP] and the very clear detection of the "super-Earth" CoRoT-7b at 3.5 × 10[SUP]-4[/SUP] relative flux are promising evidence that the space observatory is being able to detect even smaller exoplanets with the size of the Earth. [less ▲]

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See detailTransiting exoplanets from the CoRoT space mission XIV. CoRoT-11b: a transiting massive "hot-Jupiter" in a prograde orbit around a rapidly rotating F-type star
Gandolfi, D.; Hébrard, G.; Alonso, R. et al

in Astronomy and Astrophysics (2010), 524

The CoRoT exoplanet science team announces the discovery of CoRoT-11b, a fairly massive hot-Jupiter transiting a V=12.9 mag F6 dwarf star (M*=1.27 +/- 0.05 Msun, R*=1.37 +/- 0.03 Rsun, Teff=6440 +/- 120 K ... [more ▼]

The CoRoT exoplanet science team announces the discovery of CoRoT-11b, a fairly massive hot-Jupiter transiting a V=12.9 mag F6 dwarf star (M*=1.27 +/- 0.05 Msun, R*=1.37 +/- 0.03 Rsun, Teff=6440 +/- 120 K), with an orbital period of P=2.994329 +/- 0.000011 days and semi-major axis a=0.0436 +/- 0.005 AU. The detection of part of the radial velocity anomaly caused by the Rossiter-McLaughlin effect shows that the transit-like events detected by CoRoT are caused by a planet-sized transiting object in a prograde orbit. The relatively high projected rotational velocity of the star (vsini=40+/-5 km/s) places CoRoT-11 among the most rapidly rotating planet host stars discovered so far. With a planetary mass of mp=2.33+/-0.34 Mjup and radius rp=1.43+/-0.03 Rjup, the resulting mean density of CoRoT-11b (rho=0.99+/-0.15 g/cm^3) can be explained with a model for an inflated hydrogen-planet with a solar composition and a high level of energy dissipation in its interior. [less ▲]

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See detailA transiting giant planet with a temperature between 250K and 430K
Deeg, H. J.; Moutou, C.; Erikson, A. et al

in Nature (2010), 464

Of the over 400 known exoplanets, there are about 70 planets that transit their central star, a situation that permits the derivation of their basic parameters and facilitates investigations of their ... [more ▼]

Of the over 400 known exoplanets, there are about 70 planets that transit their central star, a situation that permits the derivation of their basic parameters and facilitates investigations of their atmospheres. Some short-period planets, including the first terrestrial exoplanet (CoRoT-7b), have been discovered using a space mission designed to find smaller and more distant planets than can be seen from the ground. Here we report transit observations of CoRoT-9b, which orbits with a period of 95.274days on a low eccentricity of 0.11+/-0.04 around a solar-like star. Its periastron distance of 0.36 astronomical units is by far the largest of all transiting planets, yielding a `temperate' photospheric temperature estimated to be between 250 and 430K. Unlike previously known transiting planets, the present size of CoRoT-9b should not have been affected by tidal heat dissipation processes. Indeed, the planet is found to be well described by standard evolution models with an inferred interior composition consistent with that of Jupiter and Saturn. [less ▲]

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See detailTransiting exoplanets from the CoRoT space mission IX. CoRoT-6b: a transiting `hot Jupiter' planet in an 8.9d orbit around a low-metallicity star
Fridlund, M.; Hebrard, G.; Alonso, R. et al

in Astronomy and Astrophysics (2010), 512

The CoRoT satellite exoplanetary team announces its sixth transiting planet in this paper. We describe and discuss the satellite observations as well as the complementary ground-based observations ... [more ▼]

The CoRoT satellite exoplanetary team announces its sixth transiting planet in this paper. We describe and discuss the satellite observations as well as the complementary ground-based observations - photometric and spectroscopic - carried out to assess the planetary nature of the object and determine its specific physical parameters. The discovery reported here is a `hot Jupiter' planet in an 8.9d orbit, 18 stellar radii, or 0.08 AU, away from its primary star, which is a solar-type star (F9V) with an estimated age of 3.0 Gyr. The planet mass is close to 3 times that of Jupiter. The star has a metallicity of 0.2 dex lower than the Sun, and a relatively high $^7$Li abundance. While thelightcurveindicatesamuchhigherlevelof activity than, e.g., the Sun, there is no sign of activity spectroscopically in e.g., the [Ca ] H&K lines. [less ▲]

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See detailPlanetary transit candidates in Corot-IRa01 field
Carpano, S.; Cabrera, J.; Alonso, R. et al

in Astronomy and Astrophysics (2009), 506

Context: CoRoT is a pioneering space mission devoted to the analysis of stellar variability and the photometric detection of extrasolar planets. <BR />Aims: We present the list of planetary transit ... [more ▼]

Context: CoRoT is a pioneering space mission devoted to the analysis of stellar variability and the photometric detection of extrasolar planets. <BR />Aims: We present the list of planetary transit candidates detected in the first field observed by CoRoT, IRa01, the initial run toward the Galactic anticenter, which lasted for 60 days. <BR />Methods: We analysed 3898 sources in the coloured bands and 5974 in the monochromatic band. Instrumental noise and stellar variability were taken into account using detrending tools before applying various transit search algorithms. <BR />Results: Fifty sources were classified as planetary transit candidates and the most reliable 40 detections were declared targets for follow-up ground-based observations. Two of these targets have so far been confirmed as planets, CoRoT-1b and CoRoT-4b, for which a complete characterization and specific studies were performed. The CoRoTâ space mission, launched on December 27th 2006, has been developed and is operated by CNES, with contributions from Austria, Belgium, Brazil, ESA, Germany, and Spain. Four French laboratories associated with the CNRS (LESIA, LAM, IAS ,OMP) collaborate with CNES on the satellite development. First CoRoT data are available to the public from the CoRoT archive: http://idoc-corot.ias.u-psud.fr. [less ▲]

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See detailNoise properties of the CoRoT data. A planet-finding perspective
Aigrain, S.; Pont, F.; Fressin, F. et al

in Astronomy and Astrophysics (2009), 506

In this short paper, we study the photometric precision of stellar light curves obtained by the CoRoT satellite in its planet-finding channel, with a particular emphasis on the time scales characteristic ... [more ▼]

In this short paper, we study the photometric precision of stellar light curves obtained by the CoRoT satellite in its planet-finding channel, with a particular emphasis on the time scales characteristic of planetary transits. Together with other articles in the same issue of this journal, it forms an attempt to provide the building blocks for a statistical interpretation of the CoRoT planet and eclipsing binary catch to date. After pre-processing the light curves so as to minimise long-term variations and outliers, we measure the scatter of the light curves in the first three CoRoT runs lasting more than 1 month, using an iterative non-linear filter to isolate signal on the time scales of interest. The behaviour of the noise on 2 h time scales is described well by a power-law with index 0.25 in R-magnitude, ranging from 0.1 mmag at R=11.5 to 1 mmag at R=16, which is close to the pre-launch specification, though still a factor 2-3 above the photon noise due to residual jitter noise and hot pixel events. There is evidence of slight degradation in the performance over time. We find clear evidence of enhanced variability on hour time scales (at the level of 0.5 mmag) in stars identified as likely giants from their R magnitude and B-V colour, which represent approximately 60 and 20% of the observed population in the directions of Aquila and Monoceros, respectively. On the other hand, median correlated noise levels over 2 h for dwarf stars are extremely low, reaching 0.05 mmag at the bright end. The CoRoT space mission, launched on December 27, 2006, has been developed and is operated by the CNES, with the contribution of Austria, Belgium, Brazil, ESA, Germany, and Spain. CoRoT data become publicly available one year after release to the Co-Is of the mission from the CoRoT archive: http://idoc-corot.ias.u-psud.fr/. [less ▲]

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See detailPlanetary transit candidates in CoRoT-LRc01 field
Cabrera, J.; Fridlund, M.; Ollivier, M. et al

in Astronomy and Astrophysics (2009), 506

Aims: We present here the list of planetary transit candidates detected in the first long run observed by CoRoT: LRc01, towards the galactic center in the direction of Aquila, which lasted from May to ... [more ▼]

Aims: We present here the list of planetary transit candidates detected in the first long run observed by CoRoT: LRc01, towards the galactic center in the direction of Aquila, which lasted from May to October 2007. <BR />Methods: we analyzed 3719 (33%) sources in the chromatic bands and 7689 in the monochromatic band. Instrumental noise and the stellar variability were treated with several detrending tools, on which subsequently several transit search algorithms were applied. <BR />Results: Forty two sources were classified as planetary transit candidates and up to now 26 cases have been solved. One planet (CoRoT-2b) and one brown-dwarf (CoRoT-3b) have been the subjects of detailed publications. The CoRoT space mission, launched on December 27 2006, was developed and is operated by CNES, with contributions from Austria, Belgium, Brazil, ESA, Germany and Spain. The first CoRoT data are available to the community from the CoRoT archive: http://idoc-corot.ias.u-psud.fr. [less ▲]

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See detailPlanetary transit candidates in the CoRoT initial run: resolving their nature
Moutou, C.; Pont, F.; Bouchy, F. et al

in Astronomy and Astrophysics (2009), 506

With the release of CoRoT lightcurves of the Initial Run IRa01, 50 transiting planetary candidates have been published in a companion paper. About twenty of them were identified as binary stars from the ... [more ▼]

With the release of CoRoT lightcurves of the Initial Run IRa01, 50 transiting planetary candidates have been published in a companion paper. About twenty of them were identified as binary stars from the CoRoT lightcurve itself. Complementary observations were conducted for 29 candidates, including ground-based photometry and radial-velocity measurements. Two giant planets were identified and fully characterized. Nineteen binaries are recognized, from which 10 are background eclipsing binaries in the CoRoT mask or triple systems, diluted by the main CoRoT target. Eight cases remain of unclear origin, one of them still being a planetary candidate. Comparison with simulations shows that the actual threshold of confirmed planet detection in this field does not yet fulfill the expectations, and a number of reasons are invoked, like the ranking process based on lightcurve analyses, and the strategy and limits of follow-up observations for targets fainter than magnitude 15. Based on data obtained at Observatoire de Haute Provence with SOPHIE and with HARPS on the ESO 3.6 m telescope at La Silla Observatory. The CoRoT space mission, launched on December 27th 2006, has been developed and is operated by CNES, with the contribution of Austria, Belgium, Brazil , ESA (RSSD and Science Programme), Germany and Spain. Tables 2 to 13, 15 to 17 and Figs. 4 to 7 are only available in electronic form at http://www.aanda.org [less ▲]

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See detailRate and nature of false positives in the CoRoT exoplanet search
Almenara, J. M.; Deeg, H. J.; Aigrain, S. et al

in Astronomy and Astrophysics (2009), 506

Context: The CoRoT satellite searches for planets by applying the transit method, monitoring up to 12 000 stars in the galactic plane for 150 days in each observing run. This search is contaminated by a ... [more ▼]

Context: The CoRoT satellite searches for planets by applying the transit method, monitoring up to 12 000 stars in the galactic plane for 150 days in each observing run. This search is contaminated by a large fraction of false positives, caused by different eclipsing binary configurations that might be confused with a transiting planet. <BR />Aims: We evaluate the rates and nature of false positives in the CoRoT exoplanets search and compare our results with semiempirical predictions. <BR />Methods: We consider the detected binary and planet candidates in the first three extended CoRoT runs, and classify the results of the follow-up observations completed to verify their planetary nature. We group the follow-up results into undiluted binaries, diluted binaries, and planets and compare their abundances with predictions from the literature. <BR />Results: 83% of the initial detections are classified as false positives using only the CoRoT light-curves, the remaining 17% require follow-up observations. Finally, 12% of the candidates in the follow-up program are planets. The shape of the overall distribution of the false positive rate follows previous predictions, except for candidates with transit depths below about 0.4%. For candidates with transit depths in the range from 0.1-0.4%, CoRoT detections are nearly complete, and this difference from predictions is probably real and dominated by a lower than expected abundance of diluted eclipsing binaries. The CoRoT space mission, launched on December 27th 2006, has been developed and is operated by CNES, with the contribution of Austria, Belgium, Brazil , ESA (RSSD and Science Programme), Germany and Spain. [less ▲]

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See detailThe secondary eclipse of CoRoT-1b
Alonso, R.; Alapini, A.; Aigrain, S. et al

in Astronomy and Astrophysics (2009), 506

The transiting planet CoRoT-1b is thought to belong to the pM-class of planets, in which the thermal emission dominates in the optical wavelengths. We present a detection of its secondary eclipse in the ... [more ▼]

The transiting planet CoRoT-1b is thought to belong to the pM-class of planets, in which the thermal emission dominates in the optical wavelengths. We present a detection of its secondary eclipse in the CoRoT white channel data, whose response function goes from ~400 to ~1000 nm. We used two different filtering approaches, and several methods to evaluate the significance of a detection of the secondary eclipse. We detect a secondary eclipse centered within 20 min at the expected times for a circular orbit, with a depth of 0.016 ± 0.006%. The center of the eclipse is translated in a 1-Ï upper limit to the planet's eccentricity of e cosÏ < 0.014. Under the assumption of a zero Bond Albedo and blackbody emission from the planet, it corresponds to a T_CoRoT = 2330[SUP]+120[/SUP][SUB]-140[/SUB] K. We provide the equilibrium temperatures of the planet as a function of the amount of reflected light. If the planet is in thermal equilibrium with the incident flux from the star, our results imply an inefficient transport mechanism of the flux from the day to the night sides. Based on observations obtained with CoRoT, a space project operated by the French Space Agency, CNES, with participation of the Science Programme of ESA, ESTEC/RSSD, Austria, Belgium, Brazil, Germany and Spain. [less ▲]

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See detailRemoving systematics from the CoRoT light curves. I. Magnitude-dependent zero point
Mazeh, T.; Guterman, P.; Aigrain, S. et al

in Astronomy and Astrophysics (2009), 506

This paper presents an analysis that searched for systematic effects within the CoRoT exoplanet field light curves. The analysis identified a systematic effect that modified the zero point of most CoRoT ... [more ▼]

This paper presents an analysis that searched for systematic effects within the CoRoT exoplanet field light curves. The analysis identified a systematic effect that modified the zero point of most CoRoT exposures as a function of stellar magnitude. We could find this effect only after preparing a set of learning light curves that were relatively free of stellar and instrumental noise. Correcting for this effect, rejecting outliers that appear in almost every exposure, and applying SysRem, reduced the stellar RMS by about 20%, without attenuating transit signals. The CoRoT space mission, launched on December 27th 2006, has been developed and is operated by CNES, with the contribution of Austria, Belgium, Brazil, ESA, Germany, and Spain. CoRoT data become publicly available one year after release to the Co-Is of the mission from the CoRoT archive: http://idoc-corot.ias.u-psud.fr/. [less ▲]

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See detailCoRot observations of active giants: preliminary results
Gondoin, P.; Fridlund, M.; Goupil, M. J. et al

in American Institute of Physics Conference Series (2009, February 01)

We have analysed rotation modulated light-curves of active giants observed with CoRot using spots model. Preliminary results suggest an increase of the surface spot coverage with decreasing rotation ... [more ▼]

We have analysed rotation modulated light-curves of active giants observed with CoRot using spots model. Preliminary results suggest an increase of the surface spot coverage with decreasing rotation period. A maximum of the surface spot coverage seems to occur on giants with effective temperature around 5100 K. Confirmation and interpretation of these preliminary results require groundbased follow-up observations to measure activity indicators, to identify binary systems, and to determine the stellar parameters and evolutionary status of the sample giants. [less ▲]

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See detailTransiting exoplanets from the CoRoT space mission. IV. CoRoT-Exo-4b: a transiting planet in a 9.2 day synchronous orbit
Aigrain, S.; Collier Cameron, A.; Ollivier, M. et al

in Astronomy and Astrophysics (2008), 488

CoRoT, the first space-based transit search, provides ultra-high-precision light curves with continuous time-sampling over periods of up to 5 months. This allows the detection of transiting planets with ... [more ▼]

CoRoT, the first space-based transit search, provides ultra-high-precision light curves with continuous time-sampling over periods of up to 5 months. This allows the detection of transiting planets with relatively long periods, and the simultaneous study of the host star's photometric variability. In this Letter, we report the discovery of the transiting giant planet CoRoT-Exo-4b and use the CoRoT light curve to perform a detailed analysis of the transit and determine the stellar rotation period. The CoRoT light curve was pre-processed to remove outliers and correct for orbital residuals and artefacts due to hot pixels on the detector. After removing stellar variability about each transit, the transit light curve was analysed to determine the transit parameters. A discrete autocorrelation function method was used to derive the rotation period of the star from the out-of-transit light curve. We determine the periods of the planetary orbit and star's rotation of 9.20205 ± 0.00037 and 8.87 ± 1.12 days respectively, which is consistent with this being a synchronised system. We also derive the inclination, i = 90.00_-0.085[SUP]+0.000[/SUP] in degrees, the ratio of the orbital distance to the stellar radius, a/R[SUB]s[/SUB] = 17.36[SUB]-0.25[/SUB][SUP]+0.05[/SUP], and the planet-to-star radius ratio R_p/R_s=0.1047[SUB]-0.0022[/SUB][SUP]+0.0041[/SUP]. We discuss briefly the coincidence between the orbital period of the planet and the stellar rotation period and its possible implications for the system's migration and star-planet interaction history. The CoRoT space mission, launched on December 27th 2006, has been developed and is operated by CNES, with the contribution of Austria, Belgium, Brazil, ESA, Germany, and Spain. The first CoRoT data will be available to the public in February 2009 from the CoRoT archive: http://idoc-corot.ias.u-psud.fr/ Figures 1, 4 and 5 are only available in electronic form at http://www.aanda.org [less ▲]

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See detailTransiting exoplanets from the CoRoT space mission. V. CoRoT-Exo-4b: stellar and planetary parameters
Moutou, C.; Bruntt, H.; Guillot, T. et al

in Astronomy and Astrophysics (2008), 488

Aims. The CoRoT satellite has announced its fourth transiting planet (Aigrain et al. 2008, A&A, 488, L43) with space photometry. We describe and analyse complementary observations of this system performed ... [more ▼]

Aims. The CoRoT satellite has announced its fourth transiting planet (Aigrain et al. 2008, A&A, 488, L43) with space photometry. We describe and analyse complementary observations of this system performed to establish the planetary nature of the transiting body and to estimate the fundamental parameters of the planet and its parent star. Methods: We have analysed high precision radial-velocity data, ground-based photometry, and high signal-to-noise ratio spectroscopy. Results: The parent star CoRoT-Exo-4 (2MASS 06484671-0040219) is a late F-type star of mass of 1.16 M[SUB]o[/SUB] and radius of 1.17 R[SUB]o[/SUB]. The planet has a circular orbit with a period of 9.20205 d. The planet radius is 1.19 R_Jup and the mass is 0.72 M_Jup. It is a gas-giant planet with a ``normal'' internal structure of mainly H and He. CoRoT-Exo-4b has the second longest period of the known transiting planets. It is an important discovery since it occupies an empty area in the mass-period diagram of transiting exoplanets. Based on observations obtained with CoRoT, a space project operated by the French Space Agency, CNES, with participation of the Science Programme of ESA, ESTEC/RSSD, Austria, Belgium, Brazil, Germany and Spain; and on observations made with the SOPHIE spectrograph at Observatoire de Haute Provence, France (PNP.07B.MOUT), and the HARPS spectrograph at ESO La Silla Observatory (079.C-0127/F). Table 2 and Fig. 5 are only available in electronic form at http://www.aanda.org [less ▲]

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See detailTransiting exoplanets from the CoRoT space mission. III. The spectroscopic transit of CoRoT-Exo-2b with SOPHIE and HARPS
Bouchy, F.; Queloz, D.; Deleuil, M. et al

in Astronomy and Astrophysics (2008), 482

We report on the spectroscopic transit of the massive hot-Jupiter CoRoT-Exo-2b observed with the high-precision spectrographs SOPHIE and HARPS. By modeling the radial velocity anomaly occurring during the ... [more ▼]

We report on the spectroscopic transit of the massive hot-Jupiter CoRoT-Exo-2b observed with the high-precision spectrographs SOPHIE and HARPS. By modeling the radial velocity anomaly occurring during the transit due to the Rossiter-McLaughlin (RM) effect, we determine the sky-projected angle between the stellar spin and the planetary orbital axis to be close to zero lambda = 7.2 ± 4.5 deg, and we secure the planetary nature of CoRoT-Exo-2b. We discuss the influence of the stellar activity on the RM modeling. Spectral analysis of the parent star from HARPS spectra are presented. Observations made with SOPHIE spectrograph at Observatoire de Haute Provence, France (PNP.07A.MOUT) and HARPS spectrograph at ESO La Silla Observatory (079.C-0127(F)). The CoRoT space mission, launched on December 27th 2006, has been developed and is operated by CNES, with the contribution of Austria, Belgium, Brasil, ESA, Germany, and Spain. [less ▲]

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See detailTransiting exoplanets from the CoRoT space mission. II. CoRoT-Exo-2b: a transiting planet around an active G star
Alonso, R.; Auvergne, M.; Baglin, A. et al

in Astronomy and Astrophysics (2008), 482

Context: The CoRoT mission, a pioneer in exoplanet searches from space, has completed its first 150 days of continuous observations of ~12 000 stars in the galactic plane. An analysis of the raw data ... [more ▼]

Context: The CoRoT mission, a pioneer in exoplanet searches from space, has completed its first 150 days of continuous observations of ~12 000 stars in the galactic plane. An analysis of the raw data identifies the most promising candidates and triggers the ground-based follow-up. Aims: We report on the discovery of the transiting planet CoRoT-Exo-2b, with a period of 1.743 days, and characterize its main parameters. Methods: We filter the CoRoT raw light curve of cosmic impacts, orbital residuals, and low frequency signals from the star. The folded light curve of 78 transits is fitted to a model to obtain the main parameters. Radial velocity data obtained with the SOPHIE, CORALIE and HARPS spectrographs are combined to characterize the system. The 2.5 min binned phase-folded light curve is affected by the effect of sucessive occultations of stellar active regions by the planet, and the dispersion in the out of transit part reaches a level of 1.09×10[SUP]-4[/SUP] in flux units. Results: We derive a radius for the planet of 1.465 ± 0.029 R_Jup and a mass of 3.31 ± 0.16 M_Jup, corresponding to a density of 1.31 ± 0.04 g/cm^3. The large radius of CoRoT-Exo-2b cannot be explained by current models of evolution of irradiated planets. Based on observations obtained with CoRoT, a space project operated by the French Space Agency, CNES, with participation of the Science Programme of ESA, ESTEC/RSSD, Austria, Belgium, Brazil, Germany and Spain; and on observations made with SOPHIE spectrograph at Observatoire de Haute Provence, France (PNP.07 A.MOUT), CORALIE, and HARPS spectrograph at ESO La Silla Observatroy (079.C-0127/F)). Table 2 is only available in electronic form at http://www.aanda.org [less ▲]

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See detailTransiting exoplanets from the CoRoT space mission. I. CoRoT-Exo-1b: a low-density short-period planet around a G0V star
Barge, P.; Baglin, A.; Auvergne, M. et al

in Astronomy and Astrophysics (2008), 482

Context: The pioneer space mission for photometric planet searches, CoRoT, steadily monitors about 12 000 stars in each of its fields of view. Transit candidates can be detected early in the processing of ... [more ▼]

Context: The pioneer space mission for photometric planet searches, CoRoT, steadily monitors about 12 000 stars in each of its fields of view. Transit candidates can be detected early in the processing of the data and before the end of a run of observation. Aims: We report the detection of the first planet discovered by CoRoT and characterizing it with the help of follow-up observations. Methods: Raw data were filtered from outliers and residuals at the orbital period of the satellite. The orbital parameters and the radius of the planet were estimated by best fitting the phase folded light curve with 34 successive transits. Doppler measurements with the SOPHIE spectrograph permitted us to secure the detection against binaries and to estimate the mass of the planet. Results: The accuracy of the data is very high with a dispersion in the 2.17 min binned phase-folded light curve that does not exceed ~3.×10[SUP]-4[/SUP] in flux unit. The planet orbits a mildly metal-poor G0V star of magnitude V=13.6 in 1.5 days. The estimated mass and radius of the star are 0.95±0.15 M[SUB]o[/SUB] and 1.11±0.05 R[SUB]o[/SUB]. We find the planet has a radius of 1.49±0.08 R_Jup, a mass of 1.03±0.12 M_Jup, and a particularly low mean density of 0.38±0.05 g cm[SUP]-3[/SUP]. The CoRoT space mission, launched on Dec. 27th, 2006, was developed and is operated by the CNES, with participation of the Science Program of ESA, ESTEC/RSSD, Austria, Belgium, Brazil, Germany and Spain. Based in part on observations with the SOPHIE spectrograph at Obs. de Haute Provence, France. Table [see full text] is only available in electronic form at http://www.aanda.org Individual photometric measurements are only available in electronic form at the CDS via anonymous ftp to cdsarc.u-strasbg.fr (130.79.128.5) or via http://cdsweb.u-strasbg.fr/cgi-bin/qcat?J/A+A/482/L17 [less ▲]

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See detailGENIE: a Ground-Based European Nulling Instrument at ESO Very Large Telescope Interferometer
Gondoin, P.; den Hartog, R.; Fridlund, M. et al

in Richichi, A.; Delplancke, F.; Paresce, F. (Eds.) et al The Power of Optical/IR Interferometry: Recent Scientific Results and 2nd Generation Instrumentation (2008)

Darwin is one of the most challenging space projects ever considered by the European Space Agency (ESA). Its principal objectives are to detect Earth-like planets around nearby stars, to analyze the ... [more ▼]

Darwin is one of the most challenging space projects ever considered by the European Space Agency (ESA). Its principal objectives are to detect Earth-like planets around nearby stars, to analyze the composition of their atmospheres and to assess their ability to sustain life as we know it. Darwin is conceived as a space ``nulling interferometer'' which makes use of on-axis destructive interferences to extinguish the stellar light while keeping the off-axis signal of the orbiting planet. Within the frame of the Darwin program, definition studies of a Ground based European Nulling Interferometry Experiment, called GENIE, were completed in 2005. This instrument built around the Very Large Telescope Interferometer (VLTI) in Paranal will test some of the key technologies required for the Darwin Infrared Space Interferometer. GENIE will operate in the L' band around 3.8 microns as a single Bracewell nulling interferometer using either two Auxiliary Telescopes (ATs) or two 8m Unit Telescopes (UTs). Its science objectives include the detection and characterization of dust disks and low-mass companions around nearby stars. [less ▲]

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See detailPerformance study of ground-based infrared Bracewell interferometers. Application to the detection of exozodiacal dust disks with GENIE
Absil, Olivier ULg; den Hartog, R.; Gondoin, P. et al

in Astronomy and Astrophysics (2006), 448

Nulling interferometry, a powerful technique for high-resolution imaging of the close neighbourhood of bright astrophysical objets, is currently considered for future space missions such as Darwin or the ... [more ▼]

Nulling interferometry, a powerful technique for high-resolution imaging of the close neighbourhood of bright astrophysical objets, is currently considered for future space missions such as Darwin or the Terrestrial Planet Finder Interferometer (TPF-I), both aiming at Earth-like planet detection and characterization. Ground-based nulling interferometers are being studied for both technology demonstration and scientific preparation of the Darwin/TPF-I missions through a systematic survey of circumstellar dust disks around nearby stars. In this paper, we investigate the influence of atmospheric turbulence on the performance of ground-based nulling instruments, and deduce the major design guidelines for such instruments. End-to-end numerical simulations allow us to estimate the performance of the main subsystems and thereby the actual sensitivity of the nuller to faint exozodiacal disks. Particular attention is also given to the important question of stellar leakage calibration. This study is illustrated in the context of GENIE, the Ground-based European Nulling Interferometer Experiment, to be installed at the VLTI and working in the L' band. We estimate that this instrument will detect exozodiacal clouds as faint as about 50 times the Solar zodiacal cloud, thereby placing strong constraints on the acceptable targets for Darwin/TPF-I. [less ▲]

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