References of "Goldman, Serge"
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See detailAutomated EEG entropy measurements in coma, vegetative state/unresponsive wakefulness syndrome and minimally conscious state
Gosseries, Olivia ULg; Schnakers, Caroline ULg; LEDOUX, Didier ULg et al

in Functional Neurology (2011)

Monitoring the level of consciousness in brain injured patients with disorders of consciousness is crucial as it provides diagnostic and prognostic information. Behavioral assessment remains the gold ... [more ▼]

Monitoring the level of consciousness in brain injured patients with disorders of consciousness is crucial as it provides diagnostic and prognostic information. Behavioral assessment remains the gold standard for assessing consciousness but previous studies have shown a high rate of misdiagnosis. This study aimed to investigate the usefulness of electroencephalography (EEG) entropy measurements in differentiating unconscious (coma or vegetative) from minimally conscious patients. Left fronto-temporal EEG recordings (10-minute resting state epochs) were prospectively obtained in 56 patients and 16 age-matched healthy volunteers. Patients were assessed in the acute (≤1 month post-injury;n=29) or chronic (>1 month post-injury; n=27) stage. The etiology was traumatic in 23 patients. Automated online EEG entropy calculations (providing an arbitrary value ranging from 0 to 91) were compared with behavioral assessments (Coma Recovery Scale-Revised) and outcome. EEG entropy correlated with Coma Recovery Scale total scores (r=0.49). Mean EEG entropy values were higher in minimally conscious (73±19; mean and standard deviation) than in vegetative/unresponsive wakefulness syndrome patients (45±28). Receiver operating characteristic analysis revealed an entropy cut-off value of 52 differentiating acute unconscious from minimally conscious patients (sensitivity 89% and specificity 90%). In chronic patients, entropy measurements offered no reliable diagnostic information. EEG entropy measurements did not allow prediction of outcome. User-independent time-frequency balanced spectral EEG entropy measurements seem to constitute an interesting diagnostic – albeit not prognostic – tool for assessing neural network complexity in disorders of consciousness in the acute setting. Future studies are needed before using this tool in routine clinical practice, and these should seek to improve automated EEG quantification paradigms in order to reduce the remaining false negative and false positive findings. [less ▲]

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See detailLocked-in syndrome in children: report of five cases and review of the literature
Bruno, Marie-Aurélie ULg; Schnakers, C.; Damas, François ULg et al

in Pediatric Neurology (2009), 41

The locked-in syndrome is a rare neurologic disorder defined by (1) the presence of sustained eye opening; (2) preserved awareness; (3) aphonia or hypophonia; (4) quadriplegia or quadriparesis; and (5) a ... [more ▼]

The locked-in syndrome is a rare neurologic disorder defined by (1) the presence of sustained eye opening; (2) preserved awareness; (3) aphonia or hypophonia; (4) quadriplegia or quadriparesis; and (5) a primary mode of communication that uses vertical or lateral eye movement or blinking. Five cases are reported here, and previous literature is reviewed. According to the literature, the most common etiology of locked-in syndrome in children is ventral pontine stroke, most frequently caused by a vertebrobasilar artery thrombosis or occlusion. In terms of prognosis, 35% of pediatric locked-in syndrome patients experienced some motor recovery, 26% had good recovery, 23% died, and 16% remained quadriplegic and anarthric. These findings raise important ethical considerations in terms of quality of life and end-of-life decisions in such challenging cases. [less ▲]

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See detailImpaired iodide organification in autonomous thyroid nodules
Moreno-Reyes, Rodrigo; Tang, Bich-Ngoc-Thanh; Seret, Alain ULg et al

in Journal of Clinical Endocrinology and Metabolism (2007), 92(12), 4719-4724

Context: The clinical evolution of autonomous thyroid nodules (ATN) is unpredictable, and thyrotoxicosis is observed at variable nodule size. In vitro data suggest that hydrogen peroxide production is ... [more ▼]

Context: The clinical evolution of autonomous thyroid nodules (ATN) is unpredictable, and thyrotoxicosis is observed at variable nodule size. In vitro data suggest that hydrogen peroxide production is decreased in ATN, indicating intranodular iodide organification impairment. Objective: We aimed to determine iodide organification efficiency in ATN and its relationship with thyroid status in patients. Design: Forty-six patients with a single ATN on the I-123 thyroid scan were included in the study. Biological evaluation and iodine perchlorate (I-ClO4) discharge test were carried out in all subjects. Setting: The study took place at an academic hospital. Results: Among the 46 patients, 28 patients (61%) had a positive I-ClO4 discharge test with a mean +/- SD value of discharge of 42 +/- 13%, and 18 (39%) had a negative discharge test with mean +/- SD of 5 +/- 9%. In the group of patients with a negative discharge test but not in the group with a positive test, serum-free T-3 and free T-4 concentrations were significantly correlated with the I-123 uptake. The severity of hyperthyroidism was not different between both groups. Conclusions: Intranodular iodide organification was impaired in most patients with ATN. Whether differences in organification capability could predict the risk for evolution to overt hyperthyroidism in patients with ATN remains to be established. [less ▲]

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See detailThe locked-in syndrome : what is it like to be conscious but paralyzed and voiceless?
Laureys, Steven ULg; Pellas, Frédéric; Van Eeckhout, Philippe et al

in Progress in Brain Research (2005), 150(Boundaries of Consciousness: Neurobiology and Neuropathology), 495-511

The locked-in syndrome (pseudocoma) describes patients who are awake and conscious but selectively deefferented, i.e., have no means of producing speech, limb or facial movements. Acute ventral pontine ... [more ▼]

The locked-in syndrome (pseudocoma) describes patients who are awake and conscious but selectively deefferented, i.e., have no means of producing speech, limb or facial movements. Acute ventral pontine lesions are its most common cause. People with such brainstem lesions often remain comatose for some days or weeks, needing artificial respiration and then gradually wake up, but remaining paralyzed and voiceless, superficially resembling patients in a vegetative state or akinetic mutism, In acute locked-in syndrome (LIS), eye-coded communication and evaluation of cognitive and emotional functioning is very limited because vigilance is fluctuating and eye movements may be inconsistent, very small, and easily exhausted. It has been shown that more than half of the time it is the family and not the physician who first realized that the patient was aware. Distressingly, recent studies reported that the diagnosis of LIS on average takes over 2.5 months. In some cases it took 4-6 years before aware and sensitive patients, locked in an immobile body, were recognized as being conscious. Once a LIS patient becomes medically stable, and given appropriate medical care, life expectancy increases to several decades. Even if the chances of good motor recovery are very limited, existing eye-controlled, computer-based communication technology currently allow the patient to control his environment, use a word processor coupled to a speech synthesizer, and access the worldwide net. Healthy individuals and medical professionals sometimes assume that the quality of life of an LIS patient is so poor that it is not worth living. On the contrary, chronic LIS patients typically self-report meaningful quality of life and their demand for euthanasia is surprisingly infrequent. Biased clinicians might provide less aggressive medical treatment and influence the family in inappropriate ways. It is important to stress that only the medically stabilized, informed LIS patient is competent to consent to or refuse life-sustaining treatment. Patients suffering from LIS should not be denied the right tot die - and to die with dignity - but also, and more importantly, and pain and symptom management. In our opinion, there is an urgent need for a renewed ethical and medicolegal framework for our care of locked-in patients. [less ▲]

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See detailZerebrale Funktionen bei hirngeschädigten Patienten. Was bedeuten Koma, "vegetative state“, "minimally conscious state“, "Locked-in-Syndrom“ und Hirntod?
Faymonville, Marie-Elisabeth ULg; Pantke, Karl-Heinz; Berré, Jacques et al

in Anaesthesist (2004), 53(12), 1195-1202

Comatose, vegetative, minimally conscious or locked-in patients represent a problem in terms of diagnosis, prognosis, treatment and everyday management at the intensive care unit. The evaluation of ... [more ▼]

Comatose, vegetative, minimally conscious or locked-in patients represent a problem in terms of diagnosis, prognosis, treatment and everyday management at the intensive care unit. The evaluation of possible cognitive functions in these patients is difficult because voluntary movements may be very small, inconsistent and easily exhausted. Functional neuroimaging cannot replace the clinical assessment of patients with altered states of consciousness. Nevertheless, it can describe objectively how deviant from normal the cerebral activity is and its regional distribution at rest and under various conditions of stimulation. The quantification of brain activity differentiates patients who sometimes only differ by a brief and incomplete blink of an eye. In the present paper, we will first try to define consciousness as it can be assessed at the patient's bedside. We then review the major clinical entities of altered states of consciousness encountered in the intensive care unit. Finally, we discuss the functional neuroanatomy of these conditions as assessed by positron emission tomography (PET) scanning. [less ▲]

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See detailBrain function in the vegetative state
Laureys, Steven ULg; Faymonville, Marie-Elisabeth ULg; De Tiège, Xavier et al

in Brain Death and Disorders of Consciousness (2004)

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See detailResidual cerebral functioning in the vegetative state
Laureys, Steven ULg; Faymonville, Marie-Elisabeth ULg; De Tiège, X. et al

in Arco di Giano (2004)

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See detailFunctional neuroimaging of auditory processing
Laureys, Steven ULg; Salmon, Eric ULg; Goldman, Serge et al

in Acta Oto-Rhino-Laryngologica Belgica (2003), 57(4), 267-273

There is a complex functional organization of the central auditory system from the brainstem to primary and associative auditory cortices. Functional neuroimaging has been used to visualize and confirm ... [more ▼]

There is a complex functional organization of the central auditory system from the brainstem to primary and associative auditory cortices. Functional neuroimaging has been used to visualize and confirm the spatial distribution of brain activation in temporal areas for the processing of simple acoustic stimuli. Brain activity is much more complex for words, and different networks can be recruited when phonological, lexical and semantic levels of processing are engaged. [less ▲]

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See detailBrain function in the vegetative state
Laureys, Steven ULg; Antoine, S.; Boly, Mélanie ULg et al

in Acta Neurologica Belgica (2002), 102(4), 177-185

Positron emission tomography (PET) techniques represent a useful tool to better understand the residual brain function in vegetative state patients. It has been shown that overall cerebral metabolic rates ... [more ▼]

Positron emission tomography (PET) techniques represent a useful tool to better understand the residual brain function in vegetative state patients. It has been shown that overall cerebral metabolic rates for glucose are massively reduced in this condition. However, the recovery of consciousness from vegetative state is not always associated with substantial changes in global metabolism. This finding led us to hypothesize that some vegetative patients are unconscious not just because of a global loss of neuronal function, but rather due to an altered activity in some critical brain regions and to the abolished functional connections between them. We used voxel-based Statistical Parametric Mapping (SPM) approaches to characterize the functional neuroanatomy of the vegetative state. The most dysfunctional brain regions were bilateral frontal and parieto-temporal associative cortices. Despite the metabolic impairment, external stimulation still induced a significant neuronal activation (i.e., change in blood flow) in vegetative patients as shown by both auditory click stimuli and noxious somatosensory stimuli. However this activation was limited to primary cortices and dissociated from higher-order associative cortices, thought to be necessary for conscious perception. Finally, we demonstrated that vegetative patients have impaired functional connections between distant cortical areas and between the thalami and the cortex and, more importantly, that recovery of consciousness is paralleled by a restoration of this cortico-thalamo-cortical interaction. [less ▲]

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See detailGuidelines for brain radionuclide imaging - Perfusion Single Photon Computed Tomography (SPECT) using Tc-99m radiopharmaceuticals and brain metabolism Positron Emission Tomography (PET) using F-18 fluorodeoxyglucose
Vander Borght, T.; Laloux, P.; Maes, A. et al

in Acta Neurologica Belgica (2001), 101(4), 196-209

The purpose of these guidelines is to assist nuclear medicine practitioners in recommending, performing, interpreting, and reporting the results of brain perfusion SPECT studies using Tc-99m ... [more ▼]

The purpose of these guidelines is to assist nuclear medicine practitioners in recommending, performing, interpreting, and reporting the results of brain perfusion SPECT studies using Tc-99m radiopharmaceuticals and brain metabolism PET studies using F-18 fluorodeoxyglucose (FDG). These guidelines have been adapted and extended from those produced by the Society, of Nuclear Medicine (Juni et al., 1998) and the European Association of Nuclear Medicine by, a Belgian group of experts in the field trained in neurology and/or nuclear medicine. Some indications are not universally approved (e.g. brain death), but largely, supported by the literature. They, have been included in these guidelines in order to provide recommendations and a standardised protocol [less ▲]

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See detailImpaired effective cortical connectivity in vegetative state : Preliminary investigation using PET
Laureys, Steven ULg; Goldman, Serge; Phillips, Christophe ULg et al

in Neuroimage (1999), 9(4), 377-382

Vegetative state (VS) is a condition of abolished awareness with persistence of arousal. Awareness is part of consciousness, which itself is thought to represent an emergent property of cerebral neural ... [more ▼]

Vegetative state (VS) is a condition of abolished awareness with persistence of arousal. Awareness is part of consciousness, which itself is thought to represent an emergent property of cerebral neural networks. Our hypothesis was that part of the neural correlate underlying VS is an altered connectivity, especially between the associative cortices. We assessed regional cerebral glucose metabolism (rCMRGlu) and effective cortical connectivity in four patients in VS by means of statistical parametric mapping and [F-18]fluorodeoxyglucose-positron emission tomography. Our data showed a common pattern of impaired rCMRGlu in the prefrontal, premotor, and parietotemporal association areas and posterior cingulate cortex/precuneus in VS. In a next step, we demonstrated that in VS patients various prefrontal and premotor areas have in common that they are less tightly connected with the posterior cingulate cortex than in normal controls. These results provide a strong argument for an alteration of cortical connectivity in VS patients. (C) 1999 Academic Press. [less ▲]

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See detailAutomatic Synthesis of [18F]Altanserin, a Radiopharmaceutical for Positron Emission Tomographic Studies of the Serotonergic Type-2 Receptors
Monclus, Michel; Van Naemen, John; Mulleneers, Eric et al

in Clinical Positron Imaging (1998), 1(2), 111-116

[18F]Altanserin is routinely used in several centers to study the serotonergic type-2 receptors (5HT2) with positron emission tomography (PET). An automatic production system allowing the preparation of ... [more ▼]

[18F]Altanserin is routinely used in several centers to study the serotonergic type-2 receptors (5HT2) with positron emission tomography (PET). An automatic production system allowing the preparation of multimillicurie amounts [>1.5 GBq (40 mCi) EOS, mean radiochemical yield 20 ± 6% EOB, specific activity >1 Ci/µmol Image] of this radiopharmaceutical within a synthesis time of 90 minutes (quality controls included) is described in this paper. The apparatus includes the recovery of the activity from the target, the preparation of the dried [18F]KF/kryptofix 2.2.2 complex, the labeling reaction using a microwave cavity, the Sep Pak and HPLC purification. A sterile, pyrogen-free and single use unit was also developed for the formulation of the injectable solution. This last part could be used for the formulation of many other radiopharmaceuticals. [less ▲]

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See detailIn vivo binding of [F-18]altanserin to rat brain 5HT(2) receptors: A film and electronic autoradiographic study
Biver, Françoise; Lotstra, Françoise; Monclus, M. et al

in Nuclear Medicine and Biology (1997), 24(4), 357-360

To further validate its use in positron emission tomography (PET), we studied the binding of [18F]altanserin, a specific 5HT2 radioligand, in the rat brain using in vivo autoradiography. Distribution of ... [more ▼]

To further validate its use in positron emission tomography (PET), we studied the binding of [18F]altanserin, a specific 5HT2 radioligand, in the rat brain using in vivo autoradiography. Distribution of [18F]altanserin binding was comparable to the in vitro mapping of 5HT2 receptors reported in the literature. Selective displacers were used to test the reversibility and the selectivity of this radioligand. Specific binding of [18F]altanserin in the rat frontal cortex was quantified by direct counting with an electronic imaging system and by quantification on digitalized autoradiograms. Close results of about 30 pmol/g were obtained with both methods. Our data confirmed that [18F]altanserin is a valid tracer for 5HT2 receptors binding studies. [less ▲]

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See detailDevelopment of a positron emission tomography radiopharmaceutical for imaging thymidine kinase gene expression : Synthesis and in vitro evaluation of 9-{3-[18F] Fluoro-1-hydroxy-2-propoxymethyl guanine
Monclus, Michel; Luxen, André ULg; Cool, Vincent et al

in Bioorganic and Medicinal Chemistry Letters (1997), 7(14), 1879-1882

9-[(3-fluoro-1-hydroxy-2-propoxy)methyl]guanine (FHPG) 2 has been labeled with fluorine-18 and evaluated in vitro as a potential radiotracer for mapping gene expression in vivo with positron emission ... [more ▼]

9-[(3-fluoro-1-hydroxy-2-propoxy)methyl]guanine (FHPG) 2 has been labeled with fluorine-18 and evaluated in vitro as a potential radiotracer for mapping gene expression in vivo with positron emission tomography (PET). [less ▲]

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See detailBrain hypometabolism of glucose in anorexia nervosa: Normalization after weight gain
Delvenne, Véronique; Goldman, Serge; De Maertelaer, Viviane et al

in Biological Psychiatry (1996), 40(8), 761-768

Using positron emission tomography and (18-F)-fluorodeoxyglucose, we studied cerebral glucose metabolism in 10 anorectic girls within their underweight state and after weight gain. Ten age- and sex ... [more ▼]

Using positron emission tomography and (18-F)-fluorodeoxyglucose, we studied cerebral glucose metabolism in 10 anorectic girls within their underweight state and after weight gain. Ten age- and sex-matched healthy volunteers were used as controls. Both groups were scanned during rest, eyes closed and with low ambient noise. In absolute values, the underweight anorectic patients, when compared to control subjects, showed a global (p = 0.002) and regional (p ≤ 0.001) hypometabolism of glucose which normalized with weight gain. In relative values, no global difference could be assessed between underweight anorectic patients and controls but a trend can, nevertheless, be observed toward parietal and superior frontal cortex hypometabolism associated with a relative hypermetabolism in the caudate nuclei and in the inferior frontal cortex. After weight gain, all regions normalized for absolute and relative values, although a trend appears toward relative parietal hypometabolism and inferior frontal cortex hypermetabolism in weight gain anorectic patients. Absolute brain glucose hypometabolism might result from neuroendocrinological or morphological aspects of anorexia nervosa or might be the expression of altered neurotransmission following deficient nutritional state. As some differences exists in relative values in underweight patients and tend to persist in weight gain states, this could support a potential abnormal cerebral functioning, a different reaction to starvation within several regions of the brain or different restoration rates according to the region. [less ▲]

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See detailInterregional correlation of cerebral glucose metabolism in unmedicated schizophrenia
Biver, Françoise; Goldman, Serge; De Maertelaer, Viviane et al

in European Neuropsychopharmacology (1996), 6(2), 141-147

To investigate metabolic relationships between different brain regions in schizophrenia, we measured regional brain metabolism using positron emission tomography (PET) and [18F]fluorodeoxyglucose (FDG) in ... [more ▼]

To investigate metabolic relationships between different brain regions in schizophrenia, we measured regional brain metabolism using positron emission tomography (PET) and [18F]fluorodeoxyglucose (FDG) in 15 unmedicated schizophrenic patients and 15 healthy subjects. We analyzed correlations between glucose metabolism data of multiple brain regions using factorial analysis and correlation coefficient comparisons. Absolute regional intercorrelations in schizophrenic brains were found to be significantly stronger than in controls, in relationship to the greater variability of metabolic rates in schizophrenic patients. Variability of normalized metabolic rates and regional intercorrelations were not significantly different between schizophrenic patients and control subjects. We conclude that a global metabolic factor accounts for the variability of metabolic data in untreated schizophrenia. [less ▲]

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See detailProduction, automatic delivery and bolus injection of O-15 water for positron emission tomography studies
VanNaemen, John; Monclus, Michel; Damhaut, Philippe et al

in Nuclear Medicine and Biology (1996), 23(4), 413-416

An automatic system allowing repetitive bolus injection of oxygen-15-labeled water for PET studies is described in this report. The production of this radiopharmaceutical by the 16O(p,pn)15O nuclear ... [more ▼]

An automatic system allowing repetitive bolus injection of oxygen-15-labeled water for PET studies is described in this report. The production of this radiopharmaceutical by the 16O(p,pn)15O nuclear reaction on H216O, its purification and delivery nearby the PET camera, the injection system, and the quality controls are presented. [less ▲]

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