References of "Goffin, Frédéric"
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See detailREGISTRE BELGE ET CENTRES DE RÉFÉRENCE POUR LES MALADIES TROPHOBLASTIQUES GESTATIONNELLES
DELCOMINETTE, Sarah ULg; TIMMERMANS, Marie ULg; DELBECQUE, Katty ULg et al

in Revue Médicale de Liège (2015), 70(11), 550-556

Gestational trophoblastic diseases include placental pathologies comprising fertilization abnormalities (hydatidiform moles) and malignant lesions (choriocarcinoma, placental site trophoblastic tumor and ... [more ▼]

Gestational trophoblastic diseases include placental pathologies comprising fertilization abnormalities (hydatidiform moles) and malignant lesions (choriocarcinoma, placental site trophoblastic tumor and epithelioid trophoblastic tumor). Due to their low incidence and heterogeneity, their diagnosis, management and treatment are not always optimal. Following the example of other European countries, a national registration system with two reference centers has been set up to guide physicians and patients and to propose individualized management. The centers offer their expertise through a systematic centralised pathology review by a panel of experts. HCG values are plotted in regression curves. In case of gestational trophoblastic neoplasia, an imaging work-up is proposed, from which the FIGO score and stage are derived and will guide the choice of treatment. Belgian centers offer a multidisciplinary approach, in partnership with the referent physician. More information for practitioners and patients is available on a web site: www.mole-chorio-bgog.eu, which also harbours a forum of discussion. [less ▲]

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See detailGestationnal trophoblastic diseases
GOFFIN, Frédéric ULg; Seckl, M

Conference (2015, October)

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See detailAn EG-VEGF-dependent decrease in homeobox gene NKX3.1 contributes to cytotrophoblast dysfunction: a possible mechanism in human fetal growth restriction
Murthi, P; Brouillet, S; Pratt, A et al

in Molecular Medicine (2015)

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See detailLaparoscopy and endometrial cancer
KRIDELKA, Frédéric ULg; GOFFIN, Frédéric ULg; Leblanc, Eric et al

in Minimally Invasive surgery (2015)

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See detailDa vinci robotic hysterectomy: Results of an international collaborative group polled data analyses
Hebert, T; Ferrer, C; Gortchev, G et al

in Chirugie robotisée des cancers gynécologiques (2015)

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See detailRobotic pelvic lymphadenectomy for gynaecological maligancies. Multicentric experience.
Hebert, T; GOFFIN, Frédéric ULg; Narducci, F et al

in Chirugie robotisée des cancers gynécologiques (2015)

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See detailGenotyping analysis of placental site trophoblastic tumor (PSTT) complicating a twin pregnancy with a complete mole and coexistent viable fetus
Patrier, Sophie; Steenhaut, Patricia; Lamy, Aude et al

Poster (2015)

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See detailVulvar Skin Disorders throughout Lifetime: About Some Representative Dermatoses
DOYEN, Jean ULg; Demoulin, Stéphanie ULg; DELBECQUE, Katty ULg et al

in BioMed Research International (2014)

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See detailUterine leiomyosarcoma diagnosed by operative hysteroscopy
Ozdemir, Muge; BRICHANT, Géraldine ULg; GOFFIN, Frédéric ULg et al

Poster (2014)

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See detailNational Belgian registration of gestational trophoblastic disease - a Belgian gynaecological oncology group (BGOG) initiative
Han, Sileny; Noel, Jean-Christophe; Moerman, Philippe et al

Poster (2014)

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See detailCosts of endometrial cancer
GOFFIN, Frédéric ULg

Conference (2014)

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See detailImproved computer-assisted analysis of the global lymphatic network in human cervical tissues.
Balsat, Cédric ULg; Signolle, Nicolas; GOFFIN, Frédéric ULg et al

in Modern Pathology : An Official Journal of the United States & Canadian Academy of Pathology, Inc (2014), 27(6), 887-98

Lymphatic dissemination is a key event in cervical cancer progression and related tumor lymphatic markers are viewed as promising prognostic factor of nodal extension. However, validating such parameters ... [more ▼]

Lymphatic dissemination is a key event in cervical cancer progression and related tumor lymphatic markers are viewed as promising prognostic factor of nodal extension. However, validating such parameters requires an objective characterization of the lymphatic vasculature. Here, we performed a global analysis of the lymphatic network using a new computerized method applied on whole uterine cervical digital images. Sixty-eight cases of cervical neoplasia (12 CIN3, 10 FIGO stage 1A and 46 stage IB1) and 10 cases of normal cervical tissue were reacted with antibodies raised against D2-40, D2-40/p16 and D2-40/Ki67. Immunostained structures were automatically detected on whole slides. The lymphatic vessel density (D2-40), proliferating lymphatic vessel density (D2-40/ki67) and spatial lymphatic distribution in respect to the adjacent epithelium were assessed from normal cervix to early cervical cancer and correlated with lymphovascular space invasion and lymph node status. Prominent lymphatic vessel density and proliferating lymphatic vessel density are detected under the transformation zone of benign cervix and no further increase is noted during cancer progression. Notably, a shift of lymphatic vessel distribution toward the neoplastic edges is detected. In IB1 cervical cancer, although intra- and peritumoral lymphatic vessel density are neither correlated with lymphovascular space invasion nor with lymph node metastasis, a specific spatial distribution with more lymphatic vessels in the vicinity of tumor edges is predictive of lymphatic dissemination. Herein, we provide a new computerized method suitable for an innovative detailed analysis of the lymphatic network. We show that the transformation zone of the benign cervix acts as a baseline lymphangiogenic niche before the initiation of neoplastic process. During cancer progression, this specific microenvironment is maintained with lymphatic vessels even in closer vicinity to tumor cells.Modern Pathology advance online publication, 6 December 2013; doi:10.1038/modpathol.2013.195. [less ▲]

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See detailEvaluation of CellSolutions BestPrep(R) Automated Thin-Layer Liquid-Based Cytology Papanicolaou Slide Preparation and BestCyte(R) Cell Sorter Imaging System.
Delga, Agnes; GOFFIN, Frédéric ULg; Kridelka, Frédéric ULg et al

in Acta cytologica (2014)

Objective: A double-blind study was conducted to compare the performance of the new BestPrep(R) (CellSolutions) liquid-based thin-layer Papanicolaou (Pap) test with ThinPrep(R) (Hologic). Study Design ... [more ▼]

Objective: A double-blind study was conducted to compare the performance of the new BestPrep(R) (CellSolutions) liquid-based thin-layer Papanicolaou (Pap) test with ThinPrep(R) (Hologic). Study Design: Samples from the study patients (n = 105) were collected twice in the same encounter with the ThinPrep sample always taken first and the BestPrep sample collected second. Slides were prepared according to both manufacturers' protocols and evaluated using manual microscopic review and the BestCyte(R) cell sorter imaging system (CellSolutions). Diagnostic truth for each case was determined by independent manual review of both slides by multiple pathologists and histology when available. The presence of atypical squamous cells of undetermined significance was the threshold for positive for sensitivity and specificity calculations. Results: BestPrep and ThinPrep, by manual review, had sensitivities for high-grade squamous intraepithelial lesion (HSIL) cases of 100 and 95.6%, respectively. Using the BestCyte cell sorter, both had 100% sensitivity. For the same HSIL cases, the digene HC2 high-risk human papillomavirus DNA test had sensitivities of 100% (BestPrep) and 95.6% (ThinPrep). Specificities were 71.4% (BestPrep) and 54.8% (ThinPrep). Conclusions: BestPrep was equivalent to ThinPrep for manual review even though BestPrep was always the second sample collected. The BestCyte cell sorter provides a practical alternative to manual review for both BestPrep and ThinPrep slides. (c) 2014 S. Karger AG, Basel. [less ▲]

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