References of "Goffin, Dorothée"
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See detailPhysiological and bio-functional properties of gum arabic: a notable interest for certain human diseases
Eloundou Mballa, Pierre; Goffin, Dorothée ULg; Destain, Jacqueline ULg et al

in Biotechnologie, Agronomie, Société et Environnement = Biotechnology, Agronomy, Society and Environment [=BASE] (in press)

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See detailWood Acid Hydrolysate as a Feedstock for Chlorella Growth
Miazek, Krystian ULg; Goffin, Dorothée ULg; Richel, Aurore ULg et al

Scientific conference (2015, June 24)

In this work, the effect of beech (Fagus sylvatica) wood acid hydrolysate on growth of Chlorella sorokin-iana was evaluated. Experiments carried out in this study show that neutralized wood acid ... [more ▼]

In this work, the effect of beech (Fagus sylvatica) wood acid hydrolysate on growth of Chlorella sorokin-iana was evaluated. Experiments carried out in this study show that neutralized wood acid hydrolysate can vastly improve Chlorella growth, due to the presence of organic carbon. However, simultaneously the suppression of Chlorella growth at the onset of cultivation was observed, presumably due to inhibitory substances, and this effect was more pronounced with the increase of hydrolysate dosage. Beech wood acid hydrolysate can be a valuable feedstock to stimulate Chlorella growth, on condition that inhibitory level of hydrolysate loading is avoided. [less ▲]

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See detailInnovation alimentaire : Retour vers le futur
Goffin, Dorothée ULg

Conference given outside the academic context (2015)

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See detailPoint de vue scientifique : l'impression 3D des aliments
Goffin, Dorothée ULg

Conference given outside the academic context (2015)

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See detailL'assiette du futur : surprises, passion, innovation et... gourmandise
Goffin, Dorothée ULg; Richard, Gaetan ULg

Conference given outside the academic context (2015)

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See detailSmart Gastronomy Lab made in Creative Wallonia
Goffin, Dorothée ULg

Conference given outside the academic context (2014)

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See detailLe Smart Gastronomy Lab : design de service au service de l'innovation agro-alimentaire
Goffin, Dorothée ULg

Conference given outside the academic context (2014)

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See detailEffects of Size and Dispersity of Microcrystalline Celluloses on Size, Structure and Stability of Nanocrystalline Celluloses Extracted by Acid Hydrolysis
Qi, Liu; Weiping, Hao; Yongguang, Yang et al

in Nano LIFE (2014), 4(4),

Nanocrystalline celluloses (NCCs) were separated from four commercial microcrystalline celluloses (MCCs) by an acid hydrolysis–sonication treatment. Transmission electron microscopy (TEM), atomic force ... [more ▼]

Nanocrystalline celluloses (NCCs) were separated from four commercial microcrystalline celluloses (MCCs) by an acid hydrolysis–sonication treatment. Transmission electron microscopy (TEM), atomic force microscopy (AFM), Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) spectrum, X-ray di®raction (XRD) and thermogravimetric analysis (TGA) were conducted to investigate the NCCs. MCCs with di®erent morphologies and particle sizes showed di®erent aggregation degrees. The aggregation of MCCs followed the order MCC1 > MCC3 > MCC2 > MCC4, which is the same order of the heights of the resulting NCCs. The best uniformity and thermal stability were characterized for NCC3, which was produced by MCC3 with smallest original particle size and good dispersity among the four MCCs. This result suggests that both the original particle size and dispersity of MCCs had signi¯cant e®ects on separated NCCs. [less ▲]

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See detailChlorophyll: natural sources, extraction methods and application for textile industry
Miazek, Krystian ULg; Remacle, Claire ULg; Richel, Aurore ULg et al

Conference (2014, October 14)

Chlorophyll is a photosynthetic pigment available abundantly in microalgae and terrestrial plants. This pigment found applications in pharmaceutical, cosmetic and food products as a wound healing ... [more ▼]

Chlorophyll is a photosynthetic pigment available abundantly in microalgae and terrestrial plants. This pigment found applications in pharmaceutical, cosmetic and food products as a wound healing, antioxidant or coloring agent. Recent reports suggest that chlorophyll can also be used as a biomordant to enhance the dyeing process of textile products, but also as a textile dye with antimicrobial properties. In this presentation, different aspects of chlorophyll production are discussed. Firstly, numerous plant biomass types as potential sources of chlorophyll are presented. Subsequently, different methods for chlorophyll extraction and separation from plant biomass are described. Finally, possibilities of chlorophyll implementation into textile products on industrial scale are evaluated. [less ▲]

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See detailIntelligence Stratégique : Les chercheurs ont la parole …
Goffin, Dorothée ULg

Conference given outside the academic context (2014)

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See detailLa Chimiste et l’Alchimiste à la racine du goût
Goffin, Dorothée ULg

Conference given outside the academic context (2014)

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See detailLe modèle de Living Lab au service de l’Agroalimentaire
Goffin, Dorothée ULg

Conference given outside the academic context (2014)

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See detailEffect of lignocellulose related compounds on microalgae growth and product biosynthesis: a review
Miazek, Krystian ULg; Remacle, Claire ULg; Richel, Aurore ULg et al

in Energies (2014), 7(2014), 4446-4481

Microalgae contain valuable compounds that can be harnessed for industrial applications. Lignocellulose biomass is a plant material containing in abundance organic substances such as carbohydrates ... [more ▼]

Microalgae contain valuable compounds that can be harnessed for industrial applications. Lignocellulose biomass is a plant material containing in abundance organic substances such as carbohydrates, phenolics, organic acids and other secondary compounds. As growth of microalgae on organic substances was confirmed during heterotrophic and mixotrophic cultivation, lignocellulose derived compounds can become a feedstock to cultivate microalgae and produce target compounds. In this review, different treatment methods to hydrolyse lignocellulose into organic substrates are presented first. Secondly, the effect of lignocellulosic hydrolysates, organic substances typically present in lignocellulosic hydrolysates, as well as minor co-products, on growth and accumulation of target compounds in microalgae cultures is described. Finally, the possibilities of using lignocellulose hydrolysates as a common feedstock for microalgae cultures are evaluated. [less ▲]

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See detailPrésentation du Living LAb Smart Gastronomy Lab
Goffin, Dorothée ULg

Speech/Talk (2014)

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See detailGrowth of Chlorella in the presence of organic carbon: A photobioreactor study
Miazek, Krystian ULg; Goffin, Dorothée ULg; Richel, Aurore ULg et al

Scientific conference (2014, June 19)

In this study, the effect of organic carbon supplementation at low light intensity on Chlorella sorokiniana growth was evaluated. Addition of 1 g/L of acetate to media gave the highest growth rate and ... [more ▼]

In this study, the effect of organic carbon supplementation at low light intensity on Chlorella sorokiniana growth was evaluated. Addition of 1 g/L of acetate to media gave the highest growth rate and provided stable high biomass culture during prolonged cultivation time. Glucose at 1 – 5 g/L also improved biomass growth rate, although stability of high biomass culture could not be achieved. Overall, the presence of organic carbon can considerably enhance Chlorella growth when low light intensity is applied. [less ▲]

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See detailChemical Hydrolysis of Fagus sylvatica Wood: Dilute Acid vs. Alkaline Treatment
Miazek, Krystian ULg; Goffin, Dorothée ULg; Richel, Aurore ULg

Poster (2014, March 05)

Lignocellulosic biomass, found in a large variety of plants such as coniferous trees (Softwood), broad leaved trees (Hardwood), grasses and agricultural or food residues, is the most abundant source of ... [more ▼]

Lignocellulosic biomass, found in a large variety of plants such as coniferous trees (Softwood), broad leaved trees (Hardwood), grasses and agricultural or food residues, is the most abundant source of molecules required for production of biofuels and high value - added products. Lignocellulose is composed of three polymers: cellulose, hemicellulose and lignin. Cellulose is a non-branched polymer consisting of glucoses (hexoses). Hemicellulose is a complex carbohydrate containing pentoses (mainly xyloses in the case of Hardwood, grasses and agricultural wastes) or hexoses (usually mannoses in the case of Softwood) as the main sugars. Lignin is a biopolymer with aromatic alcohols as basic monomeric units. Cellulose chains are arranged in bundles and interlinked with hemicellulose. Lignin is cross-linked with hemicellulose and occupies space between cellulose bundles. Due to complex polymeric structure, lignocellulosic materials are resistant to hydrolysis. A number of treatment methods (mechanical, chemical, biochemical) is implemented to successfully hydrolyse lignocellulose. Amongst chemical methods harnessed to break lignocellulose structure, dilute acid and alkaline treatments are commonly mentioned, as the most efficient ones. The objective of this study was to evaluate the effect of dilute acid and alkaline treatment on hydrolysis rate of polymeric components in Fagus sylvatica wood. Fagus sylvatica also known as common beech is a broad leaved, deciduous tree that belongs to the family of Fagaceae, widely spread in Europe. Beech wood was determined to contain 48 % glucose, 18 % xylose and 20 % Klason lignin in its dry material. Results of this study showed that 1 h hydrolysis at 100 °C with the use of 3 % H2SO4 resulted in 71 % removal of xylose and 4 % removal of glucose with Klason lignin remained intact. Additionally, the presence of sugar degradation products: 2 - furfural and hydroxymethylfurfural was detected in dilute acid hydrolysate. Release of 2 - furfural and hydroxymethylfurfural from beech wood was determined as 0.03 % and 0.1 %, respectively. On the other hand, 1 h hydrolysis at 100 °C with the use of 7 % NaOH caused 59 % xylose removal and 11 % removal of Klason lignin with no effect on glucose. Dilute acid hydrolysis proved to be more efficient in removing xylose, but alkaline hydrolysis additionally showed to remove Klason lignin. [less ▲]

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See detailGrowth of Chlorella in vanillin enriched medium
Miazek, Krystian ULg; Goffin, Dorothée ULg; Richel, Aurore ULg

Poster (2013, August)

In this work the effect of different concentration of vanillin on the growth of Chlorella culture was evaluated. Two concentrations of vanillin: 60 mg/L and 300 mg/L in Bold Basal Medium (BBM) were tested ... [more ▼]

In this work the effect of different concentration of vanillin on the growth of Chlorella culture was evaluated. Two concentrations of vanillin: 60 mg/L and 300 mg/L in Bold Basal Medium (BBM) were tested and an inoculum from a two month Chlorella sp. (CCBA) culture was used. Vanillin at concentration of 60 mg/L showed to possess stimulating effect on Chlorella growth during 11 days of cultivation. Stimulation of Chlorella started on 3rd day of growth and was accompanied by 87% decrease of vanillin concentration within first 3 days of cultivation and its complete removal from growth media after 7 days. The acceleration of Chlorella growth in vanillin containing medium was detected due to biomass density, up to 1.2 times bigger than in the control culture, but also by measurement of chlorophyll content. Increased amount of chlorophyll content, up to 1.35 times higher than in control, was found between 4th and 11th day of cultivation. The response of Chlorella towards higher concentration of vanillin (300 mg/L) was different when compared to experiments where only 60 mg/L was used. During first 4 days of cultivation, strong inhibition of Chlorella exposed to 300 mg/L vanillin was observed and vanillin concentration maintained at the same initial concentration. During next days, a recovery effect occurred as biomass density and chlorophyll content gradually increased in comparison to the onset of growth and vanillin concentration decreased to 2 % of its initial value. Biomass density measured in Chlorella culture on 11th day was much higher than at the beginning of cultivation but still by 40% smaller than in control and by 50% smaller than in the culture growing in medium with 60 mg/L of vanillin. Chlorophyll content at the end of cultivation constituted 50% of control value and 35% of chlorophyll culture with 60 mg/L vanillin in medium. [less ▲]

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