References of "Godfroid, J"
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See detailBrucellosis in two seal pups
Jauniaux, Thierry ULg; Didier, M.; Fretin, D. et al

Conference (2013)

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See detailBrucella surveillance in stranded marine mammals from the North Sea
Alonso-Velaco, E.; Jauniaux, Thierry ULg; Michel, P. et al

Poster (2013)

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See detailBrucella surveillance in stranded marine mammals from the North Sea
Alonso-Velasco, E.; Jauniaux, Thierry ULg; Michel, P. et al

Poster (2013)

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See detailBrucellosis in marine mammals stranded on the Belgian and northern France coast
Jauniaux, Thierry ULg; Brenez, C.; Fretin, D. et al

Conference (2012)

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See detailBrucella ceti infection in a harbor porpoise (Phocoena phocoena)
Jauniaux, Thierry ULg; Brenez, C.; Fretin, D. et al

Scientific conference (2012)

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See detailBrucella ceti and Brucella pinnipedialis infections in marine mammals
Godfroid, J.; Nymo, I.; Tryland, M. et al

in Aguirre, A.; Ostfeld, R.; Daszak, P. (Eds.) New directions in conservation medicine applied cases of ecological health (2012)

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See detailMonitoring of the intra-dermal tuberculosis skin test performed by Belgian field practitioners
Humblet, Marie-France ULg; Walravens, K.; Salandre, O. et al

in Research in Veterinary Science (2011)

The present study aimed to monitor skin test practices as performed by veterinarian field practitioners in Belgium. For this purpose, an anonymous postal questionnaire was elaborated and dispatched to ... [more ▼]

The present study aimed to monitor skin test practices as performed by veterinarian field practitioners in Belgium. For this purpose, an anonymous postal questionnaire was elaborated and dispatched to veterinarians involved in bovine tuberculosis detection. The questionnaire included items focusing on the skin test performance. International experts in the field of bovine tuberculosis were asked to fill the questionnaire and a scoring scale was built as follows: 0='ideal' answer, 1=acceptable answer, whereas 2=unacceptable answer. Furthermore, experts were asked to rank the questionnaire's items according to their possible impact on the risk of not detecting reactors. A global score was further calculated for each participant and a comparison of practices was carried out between the two regions of the country, i.e. Wallonia and Flanders. Significant differences were observed between both regions, a harmonization at the country level is thus essential. No veterinarian summed a null score, corresponding to the ideal skin test procedure, which suggests that skin-testing is far from being performed correctly. Field practitioners need to be sensitized to the importance of correctly performing the test. The authors recommend the questionnaire is suitable for application in other countries or regions [less ▲]

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See detailBrucellosis at the animal/ecosystem/human interface at the beginning of the 21st century.
Godfroid, J.; Scholz, H. C.; Barbier, T. et al

in Preventive Veterinary Medicine (2011), 102(2), 118-31

Following the recent discovery of new Brucella strains from different animal species and from the environment, ten Brucella species are nowadays included in the genus Brucella. Although the intracellular ... [more ▼]

Following the recent discovery of new Brucella strains from different animal species and from the environment, ten Brucella species are nowadays included in the genus Brucella. Although the intracellular trafficking of Brucella is well described, the strategies developed by Brucella to survive and multiply in phagocytic and non-phagocytic cells, particularly to access nutriments during its intracellular journey, are still largely unknown. Metabolism and virulence of Brucella are now considered to be two sides of the same coin. Mechanisms presiding to the colonization of the pregnant uterus in different animal species are not known. Vaccination is the cornerstone of control programs in livestock and although the S19, RB51 (both in cattle) and Rev 1 (in sheep and goats) vaccines have been successfully used worldwide, they have drawbacks and thus the ideal brucellosis vaccine is still very much awaited. There is no vaccine available for pigs and wildlife. Animal brucellosis control strategies differ in the developed and the developing world. Most emphasis is put on eradication and on risk analysis to avoid the re-introduction of Brucella in the developed world. Information related to the prevalence of brucellosis is still scarce in the developing world and control programs are rarely implemented. Since there is no vaccine available for humans, prevention of human brucellosis relies on its control in the animal reservoir. Brucella is also considered to be an agent to be used in bio- and agroterrorism attacks. At the animal/ecosystem/human interface it is critical to reduce opportunities for Brucella to jump host species as already seen in livestock, wildlife and humans. This task is a challenge for the future in terms of veterinary public health, as for wildlife and ecosystem managers and will need a "One Health" approach to be successful. [less ▲]

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See detailAssessment methodology of the intradermal tuberculosis skin test performed in cattle by field practitioners
Humblet, Marie-France ULg; Walravens, K.; Salandre, O. et al

Poster (2010)

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See detailDiagnosis of brucellosis in livestock and wildlife
Godfroid, J.; Nielsen, K.; Saegerman, Claude ULg

in Croation Medical Journal (2010), 51(4), 296-305

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See detailBrucella ceti infection in a harbor porpoise (Phocoena phocoena)
Jauniaux, Thierry ULg; Brenez, C.; Fretin, D. et al

in 9th Conference of European Wildlife Diseases Association (2010)

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See detailCervid herpesvirus 2 experimentally reactivated in reindeer can produce generalized viremia and abortion
das Neves, C.; Mork, T.; Thiry, Julien ULg et al

in Virus Research (2009), 145

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See detailExperimental infection of reindeer with cervid herpesvirus 2
das Neves, C.; Mork, T.; Godfroid, J. et al

in Clinical and Vaccine Immunology (2009), 16

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See detailEvaluation of three serum i-ELISA's using monoclonal antibodies and protein G as peroxidase conjugate for the diagnosis of bovine brucellosis
Saegerman, Claude ULg; De Waele, L.; Gilson, D. et al

in Veterinary Microbiology (2004), 100

Three i-ELISAs using LPS, the immunodominant component of Brucella abortus, were developed with three different conjugates: monoclonal antibodies 1C8 (anti-bovine IgG(1)) and 3H3 (mainly specific for ... [more ▼]

Three i-ELISAs using LPS, the immunodominant component of Brucella abortus, were developed with three different conjugates: monoclonal antibodies 1C8 (anti-bovine IgG(1)) and 3H3 (mainly specific for bovine IgG(2) but also reacting with IgG(1)) and protein G (reacts with both bovine IgG subclasses). Using a cut-off value of 2.5U/ml, the i-ELISA with 3H3 as conjugate had a specificity (95% CI: 98.32-99.63%) that was significantly higher than the same assay with 1C8 (95% CI: 96.08-98.26%) or PG (95% CI: 95.83-98.09%). In areas where false positive serological reactions (FPSR) were common, the specificity of the i-ELISAs decreased significantly. The specificity of the i-ELISAs increased with the age of the animals tested, irrespective of the conjugate. The specificity of the i-ELISAs and traditional tests was also examined using sera from animals infected per os with bacteria bearing LPS similar to the Brucella LPS. It appeared that Yersinia enterocolitica O:9, Xanthomonas maltophilia and Salmonella urbana infections induced FPSR both in the i-ELISAs and in the traditional tests, but the 3H3 assay was significantly less prone to produce false positive reactions than the 1C8 and PG assays. The i-ELISAs were more sensitive, allowed earlier detection, and were more persistent than the traditional serological tests both in experimentally and naturally Brucella-infected animals. Weekly i-ELISA monitoring of experimentally infected pregnant heifers (previously vaccinated or not) allowed a prediction of abortion. Furthermore, the 1C8 assay showed significantly higher titres irrespective of day post-infection and vaccination status. The accuracy of the assay could be improved by making use of additional information (e.g. animal age or conjugate) and by selecting appropriate cut-off points on the basis of the prevailing epidemiological situation. The i-ELISAs appear an appropriate choice in order to maintain an official brucellosis-free status because of their sensitivity, early detection and long persistence and, for the same reasons, seem especially valuable for the detection of latent carriers (i.e. animals classified negative by classical serological tests) among imported [less ▲]

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See detailMycobacterium bovis meningitis in a cow with clinical signs of BSE.
Roels, S.; Walravens, K.; Saegerman, Claude ULg et al

in Veterinary Record : Journal of the British Veterinary Association (2003), 152(26), 807-8

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See detailLes moyens de contrôle de la tuberculose bovine
Walravens, K.; Saegerman, Claude ULg; Boelaert, F. et al

Scientific conference (2001)

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See detailEvolution du plan de lutte contre la tuberculose bovine en Belgique
Saegerman, Claude ULg; Jouret, M.; Walravens, K. et al

Scientific conference (2001)

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See detailIdentification of an unique Mycobacterium bovis strain in belgian cattle
Rigouts, L.; Desmecht, M.; Dufey, J. et al

Scientific conference (2001)

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See detailDiagnosis of bovine brucellosis by skin test: conditions for the test and evaluation of its performance.
Saegerman, Claude ULg; Vo, T. K.; De Waele, L. et al

in Veterinary Record : Journal of the British Veterinary Association (1999), 145(8), 214-8

Brucellergene OCB (Rhone-Merieux) was used as an allergen to define the intrinsic parameters of a skin test and to compare its properties with serology for the diagnosis of bovine brucellosis. The skin ... [more ▼]

Brucellergene OCB (Rhone-Merieux) was used as an allergen to define the intrinsic parameters of a skin test and to compare its properties with serology for the diagnosis of bovine brucellosis. The skin test was also evaluated for its capacity to solve problems associated with false positive reactions in serological tests. The optimal reading delay for the skin test was 72 hours. The brucellosis allergic reaction was two to three times less intense than the tuberculosis allergic reaction. An increase of 1.1 mm or more in the skin thickness was therefore considered to be an adequate cut-off. The specificity calculated for 1192 brucellosis-free animals (including animals from brucellosis-free herds in which false positive serological reactions had been reported) was 99-83 per cent (95 per cent confidence interval [CI] 99-40 to 99-98 per cent). The sensitivity determined from 27 experimentally infected heifers ranged from 93 per cent (95 per cent CI 76 to 100 per cent) to 78 per cent (95 per cent CI 58 to 91 per cent) when measured respectively one and six months after the infection. Allergic reactions could be detected in vaccinated animals up to four-and-a-half years after the vaccination. On the other hand, no sensitisation was recorded in naive animals after up to eight monthly injections of the allergen. The skin test gave valuable information, in combination with the serological tests, in both acute and chronic brucellosis. The skin test discriminated brucellosis clearly from false positive serological reactions due to infections with Yersinia enterocolitica O9. [less ▲]

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