References of "Gladstone, G. R"
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See detailDiscrete and broadband electron acceleration in Jupiter's powerful aurora
Mauk, B. H.; Haggerty, D. K.; Paranicas, C. et al

in Nature (2017), 549

The most intense auroral emissions from Earth's polar regions, called discrete for their sharply defined spatial configurations, are generated by a process involving coherent acceleration of electrons by ... [more ▼]

The most intense auroral emissions from Earth's polar regions, called discrete for their sharply defined spatial configurations, are generated by a process involving coherent acceleration of electrons by slowly evolving, powerful electric fields directed along the magnetic field lines that connect Earth's space environment to its polar regions. In contrast, Earth's less intense auroras are generally caused by wave scattering of magnetically trapped populations of hot electrons (in the case of diffuse aurora) or by the turbulent or stochastic downward acceleration of electrons along magnetic field lines by waves during transitory periods (in the case of broadband or Alfvénic aurora). Jupiter's relatively steady main aurora has a power density that is so much larger than Earth's that it has been taken for granted that it must be generated primarily by the discrete auroral process. However, preliminary in situ measurements of Jupiter's auroral regions yielded no evidence of such a process. Here we report observations of distinct, high-energy, downward, discrete electron acceleration in Jupiter's auroral polar regions. We also infer upward magnetic-field-aligned electric potentials of up to 400 kiloelectronvolts, an order of magnitude larger than the largest potentials observed at Earth. Despite the magnitude of these upward electric potentials and the expectations from observations at Earth, the downward energy flux from discrete acceleration is less at Jupiter than that caused by broadband or stochastic processes, with broadband and stochastic characteristics that are substantially different from those at Earth. [less ▲]

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See detailMorphology of the UV aurorae Jupiter during Juno’s first perijove observations
Bonfond, Bertrand ULiege; Gladstone, G. R.; Grodent, Denis ULiege et al

in Geophysical Research Letters (2017)

On 27 August 2016, the NASA Juno spacecraft performed its first close-up observations of Jupiter during its perijove. Here we present the UV images and color ratio maps from the Juno-ultraviolet ... [more ▼]

On 27 August 2016, the NASA Juno spacecraft performed its first close-up observations of Jupiter during its perijove. Here we present the UV images and color ratio maps from the Juno-ultraviolet spectrometer UV imaging spectrograph acquired at that time. Data were acquired during four sequences (three in the north, one in the south) from 5:00 UT to 13:00 UT. From these observations, we produced complete maps of the Jovian aurorae, including the nightside. The sequence shows the development of intense outer emission outside the main oval, first in a localized region (255 ∘ –295 ∘ System III longitude) and then all around the pole, followed by a large nightside protrusion of auroral emissions from the main emission into the polar region. Some localized features show signs of differential drift with energy, typical of plasma injections in the middle magnetosphere. Finally, the color-ratio map in the north shows a well-defined area in the polar region possibly linked to the polar cap. [less ▲]

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See detailInfrared observations of Jovian aurora from Juno's first orbits: Main oval and satellite footprints
Mura, A.; Adriani, A.; Altieri, F. et al

in Geophysical Research Letters (2017), 44(11), 5308-5316

The Jovian Infrared Auroral Mapper (JIRAM) is an imager/spectrometer on board NASA/Juno mission for the study of the Jovian aurorae. The first results of JIRAM's imager channel observations of the H3 ... [more ▼]

The Jovian Infrared Auroral Mapper (JIRAM) is an imager/spectrometer on board NASA/Juno mission for the study of the Jovian aurorae. The first results of JIRAM's imager channel observations of the H3 + infrared emission, collected around the first Juno perijove, provide excellent spatial and temporal distribution of the Jovian aurorae, and show the morphology of the main ovals, the polar regions, and the footprints of Io, Europa and Ganymede. The extended Io “tail” persists for ~3 h after the passage of the satellite flux tube. Multi-arc structures of varied spatial extent appear in both main auroral ovals. Inside the main ovals, intense, localized emissions are observed. In the southern aurora, an evident circular region of strong depletion of H3 + emissions is partially surrounded by an intense emission arc. The southern aurora is brighter than the north one in these observations. Similar, probably conjugate emission patterns are distinguishable in both polar regions. ©2017. American Geophysical Union. All Rights Reserved. [less ▲]

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See detailPreliminary JIRAM results from Juno polar observations: 3. Evidence of diffuse methane presence in the Jupiter auroral regions
Moriconi, M. L.; Adriani, A.; Dinelli, B. M. et al

in Geophysical Research Letters (2017), 44(10), 4641-4648

Throughout the first orbit of the NASA Juno mission around Jupiter, the Jupiter InfraRed Auroral Mapper (JIRAM) targeted the northern and southern polar regions several times. The analyses of the acquired ... [more ▼]

Throughout the first orbit of the NASA Juno mission around Jupiter, the Jupiter InfraRed Auroral Mapper (JIRAM) targeted the northern and southern polar regions several times. The analyses of the acquired images and spectra confirmed a significant presence of methane (CH4) near both poles through its 3.3 μm emission overlapping the H3 + auroral feature at 3.31 μm. Neither acetylene (C2H2) nor ethane (C2H6) have been observed so far. The analysis method, developed for the retrieval of H3 + temperature and abundances and applied to the JIRAM-measured spectra, has enabled an estimate of the effective temperature for methane peak emission and the distribution of its spectral contribution in the polar regions. The enhanced methane inside the auroral oval regions in the two hemispheres at different longitude suggests an excitation mechanism driven by energized particle precipitation from the magnetosphere. ©2017. American Geophysical Union. All Rights Reserved. [less ▲]

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See detailPreliminary JIRAM results from Juno polar observations: 1. Methodology and analysis applied to the Jovian northern polar region
Dinelli, B. M.; Fabiano, F.; Adriani, A. et al

in Geophysical Research Letters (2017), 44(10), 4625-4632

During the first orbit around Jupiter of the NASA/Juno mission, the Jovian Auroral Infrared Mapper (JIRAM) instrument observed the auroral regions with a large number of measurements. The measured spectra ... [more ▼]

During the first orbit around Jupiter of the NASA/Juno mission, the Jovian Auroral Infrared Mapper (JIRAM) instrument observed the auroral regions with a large number of measurements. The measured spectra show both the emission of the H3+ ion and of methane in the 3–4 μm spectral region. In this paper we describe the analysis method developed to retrieve temperature and column density (CD) of the H3+ ion from JIRAM spectra in the northern auroral region. The high spatial resolution of JIRAM shows an asymmetric aurora, with CD and temperature ovals not superimposed and not exactly located where models and previous observations suggested. On the main oval averaged H3+ CDs span between 1.8 × 1012 cm−2 and 2.8 × 1012 cm−2, while the retrieved temperatures show values between 800 and 950 K. JIRAM indicates a complex relationship among H3+ CDs and temperatures on the Jupiter northern aurora. ©2017. American Geophysical Union. All Rights Reserved. [less ▲]

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See detailJupiter's magnetosphere and aurorae observed by the Juno spacecraft during its first polar orbits
Connerney, J. E. P.; Adriani, A.; Allegrini, F. et al

in Science (2017), 356(6340), 826--832

Jupiter is the largest and most massive planet in our solar system. NASA\textquoterights Juno spacecraft arrived at Jupiter on 4 July 2016 and made its first close pass on 27 August 2016. Bolton et al ... [more ▼]

Jupiter is the largest and most massive planet in our solar system. NASA\textquoterights Juno spacecraft arrived at Jupiter on 4 July 2016 and made its first close pass on 27 August 2016. Bolton et al. present results from Juno\textquoterights flight just above the cloud tops, including images of weather in the polar regions and measurements of the magnetic and gravitational fields. Juno also used microwaves to peer below the visible surface, spotting gas welling up from the deep interior. Connerney et al. measured Jupiter\textquoterights aurorae and plasma environment, both as Juno approached the planet and during its first close orbit.Science, this issue p. 821, p. 826The Juno spacecraft acquired direct observations of the jovian magnetosphere and auroral emissions from a vantage point above the poles. Juno\textquoterights capture orbit spanned the jovian magnetosphere from bow shock to the planet, providing magnetic field, charged particle, and wave phenomena context for Juno\textquoterights passage over the poles and traverse of Jupiter\textquoterights hazardous inner radiation belts. Juno\textquoterights energetic particle and plasma detectors measured electrons precipitating in the polar regions, exciting intense aurorae, observed simultaneously by the ultraviolet and infrared imaging spectrographs. Juno transited beneath the most intense parts of the radiation belts, passed about 4000 kilometers above the cloud tops at closest approach, well inside the jovian rings, and recorded the electrical signatures of high-velocity impacts with small particles as it traversed the equator. [less ▲]

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See detailResponse of Jupiter's auroras to conditions in the interplanetary medium as measured by the Hubble Space Telescope and Juno
Nichols, J. D.; Badman, S. V.; Bagenal, F. et al

in Geophysical Research Letters (2017)

We present the first comparison of Jupiter's auroral morphology with an extended, continuous and complete set of near-Jupiter interplanetary data, revealing the response of Jupiter's auroras to the ... [more ▼]

We present the first comparison of Jupiter's auroral morphology with an extended, continuous and complete set of near-Jupiter interplanetary data, revealing the response of Jupiter's auroras to the interplanetary conditions. We show that for ∼1-3 days following compression region onset the planet's main emission brightened. A duskside poleward region also brightened during compressions, as well as during shallow rarefaction conditions at the start of the program. The power emitted from the noon active region did not exhibit dependence on any interplanetary parameter, though the morphology typically differed between rarefactions and compressions. The auroras equatorward of the main emission brightened over ∼10 days following an interval of increased volcanic activity on Io. These results show that the dependence of Jupiter's magnetosphere and auroras on the interplanetary conditions are more diverse than previously thought. [less ▲]

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See detailJuno-UVS Approach Observations of Jupiter's Auroras
Gladstone, G. R.; Versteeg, M. H.; Greathouse, T. K. et al

in Geophysical Research Letters (2017)

Juno-UVS observations of Jupiter's aurora obtained during approach are presented. Prior to the bow-shock crossing on 24 June 2016, the Juno approach provided a rare opportunity to correlate local solar ... [more ▼]

Juno-UVS observations of Jupiter's aurora obtained during approach are presented. Prior to the bow-shock crossing on 24 June 2016, the Juno approach provided a rare opportunity to correlate local solar wind conditions with Jovian auroral emissions. Some of Jupiter's auroral emissions are expected to be controlled or modified by local solar wind conditions. Here we compare synoptic Juno-UVS observations of Jupiter's auroral emissions, acquired during 3-29 June 2016, with in situ solar wind observations, and related Jupiter observations from Earth. Four large auroral brightening events are evident in the synoptic data, in which the total emitted auroral power increases by a factor of 3-4 for a few hours. Only one of these brightening events correlates well with large transient increases in solar wind ram pressure. The brightening events which are not associated with the solar wind generally have a rise time of ~2 hours and a decay time of ~5 hours. [less ▲]

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See detailMeasurements of the helium 584 Å airglow during the Cassini flyby of Venus
Gérard, Jean-Claude ULiege; Gustin, Jacques ULiege; Hubert, Benoît ULiege et al

in Planetary and Space Science (2011), 59

The helium resonance line at 584 Å has been observed with the UltraViolet Imaging Spectrograph (UVIS) Extreme Ultraviolet channel during the flyby of Venus by Cassini at a period of high solar activity ... [more ▼]

The helium resonance line at 584 Å has been observed with the UltraViolet Imaging Spectrograph (UVIS) Extreme Ultraviolet channel during the flyby of Venus by Cassini at a period of high solar activity. The brightness was measured along the disk from the morning terminator up to the bright limb near local noon. The mean disk intensity was ˜320 R, reaching ˜700 R at the bright limb. These values are slightly higher than those determined from previous observations. The sensitivity of the 584 Å intensity to the helium abundance is analyzed using recent cross-sections and solar irradiance measurements at 584 Å. The intensity distribution along the UVIS footprint on the disk is best reproduced using the EUVAC solar flux model and the helium density distribution from the VTS3 empirical model. It corresponds to a helium density of 8×10[SUP]6[/SUP] cm[SUP]-3[/SUP] at the level of where the CO[SUB]2[/SUB] is 2×10[SUP]10[/SUP] cm[SUP]-3[/SUP]. [less ▲]

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See detailThe Ultraviolet Spectrograph (UVS) on Juno
Gladstone, G. R.; Persyn, S.; Eterno, J. et al

Poster (2011, July 11)

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See detailEUV spectroscopy of the Venus dayglow with UVIS on Cassini
Gérard, Jean-Claude ULiege; Hubert, Benoît ULiege; Gustin, Jacques ULiege et al

in Icarus: International Journal of Solar System Studies (2011), 211

We analyze EUV spatially-resolved dayglow spectra obtained at 0.37 nm resolution by the UVIS instrument during the Cassini flyby of Venus on 24 June 1999, a period of high solar activity level. Emissions ... [more ▼]

We analyze EUV spatially-resolved dayglow spectra obtained at 0.37 nm resolution by the UVIS instrument during the Cassini flyby of Venus on 24 June 1999, a period of high solar activity level. Emissions from OI, OII, NI, CI and CII and CO have been identified and their disc average intensity has been determined. They are generally somewhat brighter than those determined from the observations made with the HUT spectrograph at a lower activity level, We present the brightness distribution along the foot track of the UVIS slit of the OII 83.4 nm, OI 98.9 nm, Lyman-ß + OI 102.5 nm and NI 120.0 nm multiplets, and the CO C-X and B-X Hopfield-Birge bands. We make a detailed comparison of the intensities of the 834 nm, 989 nm, 120.0 nm multiplets and CO B-X band measured along the slit foot track on the disc with those predicted by an airglow model previously used to analyze Venus and Mars ultraviolet spectra. This model includes the treatment of multiple scattering for the optically thick OI, OII and NI multiplets. It is found that the observed intensity of the OII emission at 83.4 nm is higher than predicted by the model. An increase of the O[SUP]+[/SUP] ion density relative to the densities usually measured by Pioneer Venus brings the observations and the modeled values into better agreement. The calculated intensity variation of the CO B-X emission along the track of the UVIS slit is in fair agreement with the observations. The intensity of the OI 98.9 nm emission is well predicted by the model if resonance scattering of solar radiation by O atoms is included as a source. The calculated brightness of the NI 120 nm multiplet is larger than observed by a factor of ˜2-3 if photons from all sources encounter multiple scattering. The discrepancy reduces to 30-80% if the photon electron impact and photodissociation of N[SUB]2[/SUB] sources of N([SUP]4[/SUP]S) atoms are considered as optically thin. Overall, we find that the O, N[SUB]2[/SUB] and CO densities from the empirical VTS3 model provide satisfactory agreement between the calculated and the observed EUV airglow emissions. [less ▲]

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See detailUVIS observations of the FUV OI and CO 4P Venus dayglow during the Cassini flyby
Hubert, Benoît ULiege; Gérard, Jean-Claude ULiege; Gustin, Jacques ULiege et al

in Icarus (2010), 207

We analyze FUV spatially-resolved dayglow spectra obtained at 0.37 nm resolution by the UVIS instrument during the Cassini flyby of Venus. We use a least-squares fit method to determine the brightness of ... [more ▼]

We analyze FUV spatially-resolved dayglow spectra obtained at 0.37 nm resolution by the UVIS instrument during the Cassini flyby of Venus. We use a least-squares fit method to determine the brightness of the OI emissions at 130.4 and OI 135.6 nm, and of the bands of the CO fourth positive system which are dominated by fluorescence scattering. We compare the brightness observed along the UVIS foot track of the two OI multiplets with that deduced from a model of the excitation of these emissions by photoelectron impact on O atoms and resonance scattering of the solar 130.4 nm emission. The large optical thickness 130.4 nm emission is accounted for using a radiative transfer model. The airglow intensities are calculated along the foot track and found to agree with the observed 130.4 nm brightness within ˜10%. The modeled OI 135.6 nm brightness is also well reproduced by the model. The oxygen density profile of the VTS3 model is found to be consistent with the observations. We find that self-absorption of the (0, v″) bands of the fourth positive emission of CO is important and we derive a CO vertical column of about 6.4 × 10[SUP]15[/SUP] cm[SUP]‑2[/SUP] in close agreement with the value provided by the VTS3 empirical atmospheric model. [less ▲]

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See detailResponse of Jupiter's and Saturn's auroral activity to the solar wind
Clarke, J. T.; Nichols, J.; Gérard, Jean-Claude ULiege et al

in Journal of Geophysical Research. Space Physics (2009), 114

While the terrestrial aurorae are known to be driven primarily by the interaction of the Earth's magnetosphere with the solar wind, there is considerable evidence that auroral emissions on Jupiter and ... [more ▼]

While the terrestrial aurorae are known to be driven primarily by the interaction of the Earth's magnetosphere with the solar wind, there is considerable evidence that auroral emissions on Jupiter and Saturn are driven primarily by internal processes, with the main energy source being the planets' rapid rotation. Prior observations have suggested there might be some influence of the solar wind on Jupiter's aurorae and indicated that auroral storms on Saturn can occur at times of solar wind pressure increases. To investigate in detail the dependence of auroral processes on solar wind conditions, a large campaign of observations of these planets has been undertaken using the Hubble Space Telescope, in association with measurements from planetary spacecraft and solar wind conditions both propagated from 1 AU and measured near each planet. The data indicate a brightening of both the auroral emissions and Saturn kilometric radiation at Saturn close in time to the arrival of solar wind shocks and pressure increases, consistent with a direct physical relationship between Saturnian auroral processes and solar wind conditions. At Jupiter the correlation is less strong, with increases in total auroral power seen near the arrival of solar wind forward shocks but little increase observed near reverse shocks. In addition, auroral dawn storms have been observed when there was little change in solar wind conditions. The data are consistent with some solar wind influence on some Jovian auroral processes, while the auroral activity also varies independently of the solar wind. This extensive data set will serve to constrain theoretical models for the interaction of the solar wind with the magnetospheres of Jupiter and Saturn. [less ▲]

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See detailThe Ultraviolet Spectrograph (UVS) on Juno
Gladstone, G. R.; Persyn, S.; Eterno, J. et al

Conference (2008, December 01)

Juno, a NASA New Frontiers mission, plans for launch in August 2011, a 5-year cruise (including a flyby of Earth in October 2013 for a gravity boost), and 14 months around Jupiter after arriving in August ... [more ▼]

Juno, a NASA New Frontiers mission, plans for launch in August 2011, a 5-year cruise (including a flyby of Earth in October 2013 for a gravity boost), and 14 months around Jupiter after arriving in August 2016. The spinning (2 RPM), solar-powered Juno will study Jupiter from a highly elliptical orbit, in which the spacecraft (for about 6 hours once every 11 days) dives down over the north pole, skims the outermost atmosphere, and rises back up over the south pole. This orbit allows Juno avoid most of the intense particle radiation surrounding the planet and provides an excellent platform for investigating Jupiter's polar magnetosphere. Part of the exploration of Jupiter's polar magnetosphere will involve remote sensing of the far-ultraviolet H and H2 auroral emissions, plus gases such as methane and acetylene which add their absorption signature to the H2 emissions. This hydrocarbon absorption can be used to estimate the energy of the precipitating electrons; since more energetic electrons penetrate deeper into the atmosphere and the UV emissions they produce will show more absorption. Juno will carry an Ultraviolet Spectrograph (UVS) to make spectral images of Jupiter's aurora. UVS is a UV imaging spectrograph sensitive to both extreme and far ultraviolet emissions in the 70-205~nm range that will characterize the morphology and spectral nature of Jupiter's auroral emissions. Juno UVS consists of two separate sections: a dedicated telescope/spectrograph assembly and a vault electronics box. The telescope/spectrograph assembly contains a telescope which feeds a 0.15-m Rowland circle spectrograph. The telescope has an input aperture 40à 40~mm2 and uses an off-axis parabolic primary mirror. A flat scan mirror situated at the front end of the telescope (used to target specific auroral features at up to ±30° perpendicular to the Juno spin plane) directs incoming light to the primary. The light is then focused onto the spectrograph entrance slit, which has a 'dog- bone' shape 6° long, in three 2° sections of 0.2°, 0.05°, and 0.2° width (projected onto the sky). Light entering the slit is dispersed by a toroidal grating which focuses the UV bandpass onto a curved microchannel plate (MCP) cross delay line (XDL) detector with a solar blind UV- sensitive CsI photocathode, which makes up the instrument's focal plane. Tantalum shielding surrounds the detector assembly to protect the detector and the adjacent detector electronics from high-energy electrons. The main electronics box is located in the Juno vault. Inside are two redundant high-voltage power supplies (HVPS), two redundant low-voltage power supplies, the command and data handling (C&DH) electronics, heater/actuator activation electronics, scan mirror electronics, and event processing electronics. An overview of the UVS design and scientific performance will be presented. [less ▲]

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See detailThe Venus ultraviolet oxygen dayglow and aurora: Model comparison with observations
Gérard, Jean-Claude ULiege; Hubert, Benoît ULiege; Shematovich, V. I. et al

in Planetary and Space Science (2008), 56

We compare the intensity of the OI 130.4 and 135.6 nm emissions calculated using the soft electron precipitation measured on board the Pioneer Venus (PV) Orbiter with the auroral brightness observed with ... [more ▼]

We compare the intensity of the OI 130.4 and 135.6 nm emissions calculated using the soft electron precipitation measured on board the Pioneer Venus (PV) Orbiter with the auroral brightness observed with the ultraviolet spectrometer (OUVS) on board the PV. For this purpose, we use a new electron transport model based on a Monte Carlo implementation of the Boltzmann equation and a multi-stream radiative transfer model to calculate the effects of multiple scattering on the intensity field of the 130.4-nm triplet. We show that the consideration of the enhancement of the emergent 130.4-nm to the 135.6-nm intensity by multiple scattering in the optically thick Venus atmosphere increases the auroral 130.4/135.6 ratio by a factor of about 3. We find agreement with the mean 130.4/135.6 ratio observed with PV-OUVS using the typical suprathermal electron energy spectrum reported from PV in situ measurements showing a characteristic energy of about 14 eV. To account for the average OI auroral emissions, the required precipitated energy flux is 2×10[SUP]-3[/SUP] mW m[SUP]-2[/SUP], that is about 30% of the measured suprathermal night-side soft electron spectrum used as a reference. The calculated brightness of the CO Cameron bands is about twice as large as the weak observed emission, but within the error bars of the observations and the uncertainties of the dissociative excitation cross-section of CO[SUB]2[/SUB]. The electron transport model, coupled with calculations of excitation processes is also applied to an analysis of the FUV oxygen day airglow observations made with PV-OUVS and the Hopkins Ultraviolet Telescope (HUT) spectrograph. Comparisons indicate that the model accounts for both the disc-averaged intensities observed with the HUT spectrograph, the limb scans and the 130.4-nm images obtained with PV-OUVS. The relative contribution of resonance scattering of the solar line and photoelectron impact to the excitation of the 130.4-nm triplet depends on the altitude, but is globally dominated by resonance scattering. The intensity of the 130.4-nm dayglow emission does not vary proportionally with the O density in the lower thermosphere, but provides nevertheless a useful tool to remotely probe the atomic oxygen density and its variations. [less ▲]

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See detailSpectral morphology of the X-ray emission from Jupiter's aurorae
Branduardi-Raymont, G.; Elsner, Ronald F.; Galand, M. et al

in Journal of Geophysical Research (2008), 113(A2),

Simultaneous Chandra X-ray and Hubble Space Telescope FUV observations of Jupiter's aurorae carried out in February 2003 have been re-examined to investigate the spatial morphology of the X-ray events in ... [more ▼]

Simultaneous Chandra X-ray and Hubble Space Telescope FUV observations of Jupiter's aurorae carried out in February 2003 have been re-examined to investigate the spatial morphology of the X-ray events in different energy bands. The data clearly show that in the Northern auroral region (in the main auroral oval and the polar cap) events with energy > 2 keV are located at the periphery of those with energy < 2 keV and coincide with FUV bright features. In addition, X-ray spectra extracted from the areas where the two event distributions are concentrated possess different shapes. We associate the > 2 keV events (similar to 45 MW emitted power) with the electron bremsstrahlung component recently revealed by XMM-Newton in the spectra of Jupiter's aurorae, and the < 2 keV emission (similar to 230 MW) with the product of ion charge exchange, now established as the likely mechanism responsible for the soft X-ray Jovian aurora. We suggest that the same population of energetic electrons may be responsible for both, the X-ray bremsstrahlung and the FUV emission of Jupiter's aurorae. Comparison of the > 2 keV X-ray and FUV (340 GW) powers measured during the observations shows that they are broadly consistent with the predicted emissions from a population of energetic electrons precipitating in the planet's atmosphere, thus supporting our interpretation. [less ▲]

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See detailThe morphology of the X-ray emission above 2 keV from Jupiter's aurorae
Elsner, R. F.; Branduardi-Raymont, G.; Galand, M. et al

Conference (2007, June 25)

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See detailVenus' ultraviolet airglow and aurora: Monte Carlo simulations and comparison with observations
Gérard, Jean-Claude ULiege; Shematovich, V. I.; Bisikalo, D. V. et al

in European Planetary Science Congress 2006 (2006)

The Venus airglow has been observed from spectrometers on board rockets probes and satellites such as OUVS on Pioneer Venus Venera Galileo HUT on the Space Shuttle and quite recently SPICAV on Venus ... [more ▼]

The Venus airglow has been observed from spectrometers on board rockets probes and satellites such as OUVS on Pioneer Venus Venera Galileo HUT on the Space Shuttle and quite recently SPICAV on Venus Express The spectrum is dominated by emissions from helium hydrogen oxygen and carbon lines and CO bands Localized emissions of OI at 1304 and 1356 A have been sporadically observed on the nightside and are likely caused by precipitation of auroral electrons in the wake of the planet We have developed a Monte Carlo code solving the Boltzmann equation for energetic electrons to calculate the energy distribution function and fluxes of primary and secondary auroral electrons and for photoelectrons The model is used to calculate the vertical distribution of the excitation rate of various excited states For optically thick transitions such as the 3P-3S triplet at 1304 A a radiative transfert code is used to calculate the emergent emission rate We find that the relative intensity of the oxygen and CO Cameron band emissions is a sensitive indicator of the energy of auroral electrons The observed values indicate that the mean energy is on the order of 10-50 eV Dayglow intensity and distributions are also compared with observed characteristics [less ▲]

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See detailSpectral Analysis of HST-STIS Observations of Jovian UV Auroral Emissions
Gladstone, G. R.; Gérard, Jean-Claude ULiege; Gustin, Jacques ULiege et al

Conference (2005, August 01)

Spectral observations of Jupiter's far-ultraviolet (FUV) auroral emissions are commonly used to determine a ``color ratio, - defined as I(155-162nm) / I(123-130nm), which provides an estimate for the peak ... [more ▼]

Spectral observations of Jupiter's far-ultraviolet (FUV) auroral emissions are commonly used to determine a ``color ratio, - defined as I(155-162nm) / I(123-130nm), which provides an estimate for the peak emission altitude of the aurora and thus, assuming an accurate model atmosphere, for the mean energy of precipitating electrons. This is because the nascent emission spectrum resulting from electron impact on H[SUB]2[/SUB] is relatively unchanging over a wide range of energy, so that differential absorption by overlying CH[SUB]4[/SUB] is the primary modifier of the spectral shape of the emergent FUV emissions. This method is analogous to that used at Earth, with N[SUB]2[/SUB] LBH auroral emissions instead of H[SUB]2[/SUB] Lyman and Werner bands and differential absorption by O[SUB]2[/SUB] rather than methane. More detailed simulations of Jupiter's FUV auroral spectra can be used to place useful constraints on higher hydrocarbons, such as acetylene and ethane. Here we present a spectral analysis of HST-STIS G140L observations taken in September 1999, which include a region with the largest color ratio yet observed (i.e., the deepest aurora). A non-linear least squares model fit to the data is used to search for the presence of several important overlying hydrocarbons with strong and distinctive FUV absorption cross sections, e.g., CH[SUB]4[/SUB], C[SUB]2[/SUB]H[SUB]2[/SUB], C[SUB]2[/SUB]H[SUB]4[/SUB], C[SUB]2[/SUB]H[SUB]6[/SUB], CH[SUB]3[/SUB]C[SUB]2[/SUB]H, C[SUB]3[/SUB]H[SUB]8[/SUB], C[SUB]4[/SUB]H[SUB]2[/SUB], C[SUB]2[/SUB]H[SUB]2[/SUB], and C[SUB]4[/SUB]H[SUB]10[/SUB]. We gratefully acknowledge support from NASA through grant NNG05GG97G. [less ▲]

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See detailSimultaneous Chandra X-ray, HST UV, and Ulysses Radio Observations of Jupiter's Aurora
Elsner, R. F.; Bhardwaj, A.; Waite, J. H. et al

Poster (2004)

Observations of Jupiter carried out by the Chandra ACIS-S instrument over 24-26 February, 2003, show that the auroral X-ray spectrum consists of line emission consistent with high-charge states of ... [more ▼]

Observations of Jupiter carried out by the Chandra ACIS-S instrument over 24-26 February, 2003, show that the auroral X-ray spectrum consists of line emission consistent with high-charge states of precipitating ions, and not a continuum as might be expected from bremsstrahlung. The part of the spectrum due to oxygen peaks around 650 eV, which indicates a high fraction of fully-stripped oxygen in the precipitating ion flux. The OVIII emission lines at 653 eV and 774 eV, as well as the OVII emission lines at 561 eV and 666 eV, are clearly identified. There is also line emission at lower energies in the spectral region extending from 250 to 350 eV for which sulfur and carbon lines are possible candidates. The Jovian auroral spectra differ significantly from measured cometary X-ray spectra. The charge state distribution of the oxygen ion emission evident in the measured auroral spectra strongly suggests that, independent of the source of the energetic ions (magnetospheric or solar wind) the ions have undergone additional acceleration. For the magnetospheric case, acceleration to energies exceeding 10 MeV is apparently required. The ion acceleration also helps to explain the high intensities of the X-rays observed. The phase space densities of unaccelerated source populations of either solar wind or magnetospheric ions are orders of magnitude too small to explain the observed emissions. The Chandra X-ray observations were executed simultaneously with observations at ultraviolet wavelengths by the Hubble Space Telescope and at radio wavelengths by the Ulysses spacecraft. These additional data sets provide interesting hints as to the location of the source region and the acceleration characteristics of the generation mechanism. The combined observations suggest that the source of the X rays is magnetospheric in origin, and that strong field-aligned electric fields are present which simultaneously create both the several-MeV energetic ion population and the relativistic electrons believed to be responsible for the generation of 40 minute quasi-periodic radio outbursts. [less ▲]

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