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See detailAuroral emission at Jupiter, through Juno's UVS eyes
Grodent, Denis ULg; Bonfond, Bertrand ULg; Gladstone, G. et al

Conference (2015, June 02)

Juno’s orbit insertion around Jupiter will take place in little bit more than one year (July 2016). After a 107-day capture orbit (Oct. 2016), it will perform a series of 33 eleven-day science polar ... [more ▼]

Juno’s orbit insertion around Jupiter will take place in little bit more than one year (July 2016). After a 107-day capture orbit (Oct. 2016), it will perform a series of 33 eleven-day science polar orbits offering unprecedented views of the auroral regions of Jupiter. The science payload of Juno includes an UltraViolet Spectrograph (UVS) that will characterize the UV auroral emissions of Jupiter over all science orbits. It will obtain high-resolution images and spectra that will provide context for Juno’s in situ particles and fields measurements in the larger polar magnetosphere with Juno’s JADE and JEDI detectors. At the same time, the MAG instrument will accurately constrain magnetic field models, which will provide the connection between Juno and its field line footprint in the Jovian aurora. The UVS instrument consists of a solar blind MCP detector with a “dog-bone” shape FOV of 0.2°x2.5°+0.025°x2°+0.2°x2.5° providing a spatial resolution of 125 km from 1RJ above the aurora and a spectral resolution of ~0.5 nm (~2 nm for extended sources). It is sensitive to EUV-FUV radiation ranging from 70 nm to 205 nm. Juno is a spin-stabilized spacecraft and is rotating at a frequency of 2 RPM. UVS will take advantage of this motion to scan the auroral regions in the direction perpendicular to the slit, while its steerable pickup mirror (±30° from the spin plane) will make it possible to point at specific regions of the aurora. Juno’s highly eccentric science orbits have a perijove close to 1.05 RJ (~5000 km above cloud deck) and an apojove at ~38 RJ. These orbits approximately lie in the Dawn meridian plane and are such that each successive pass is at a Jovian longitude displaced by 204° from the previous perijove. At perijove, Juno’s velocity will be ~60 km/s and about 20 km/s above the poles, meaning that the spacecraft will move over the northern and southern auroral regions in approximately two hours. In this study, we are using existing HST STIS time-tag sequences of Jupiter’s UV aurorae in order to simulate the expected measurements through UVS FOV along Juno’s predicted trajectory. The simulations account for realistic instrumental specifications and pointing and for the temporal and spatial variability of the aurora. We show the results of image reconstruction obtained from scanning the auroral region with UVS slit and provide some limits on the expected data quality as a function of the location of Juno along its orbit. We also suggest portions of the science orbits for which supporting HST observations will be necessary. [less ▲]

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See detailA Comparison of FUV Auroral Emissions During the April 2002 Events as seen by the IMAGE/FUV and TIMED/GUVI Instruments
Gladstone, G.; Retherford, K.; Solomon, S. et al

Conference (2002, December 01)

The auroral emissions that resulted from the series of solar particle events and magnetic storms during 14-24 April 2002 provide an excellent data set for the cross-comparison of the IMAGE/FUV and TIMED ... [more ▼]

The auroral emissions that resulted from the series of solar particle events and magnetic storms during 14-24 April 2002 provide an excellent data set for the cross-comparison of the IMAGE/FUV and TIMED/GUVI auroral imagers. The IMAGE/FUV instrument comprises the SI spectral imager (121.8 nm and 135.6 nm) and the WIC imaging photometer (LBH) and observes the entire Earth from high Earth orbit. The TIMED/GUVI spectral imager (121.6 nm, 130.4 nm, 135.6 nm, LBH short, and LBH long) scans a nadir-to-limb swath from low Earth orbit. Although there is a large difference in spatial resolution, preliminary comparison of simultaneously-observed diffuse auroral emissions indicates fairly good agreement between the calibrated brightnesses determined for common spectral features. We will present a detailed simulation of one or more of the April 2002 events as seen by each imager to determine if a single description of the auroral precipitation can self-consistently account for the proton- and electron-generated FUV emissions observed from the two spacecraft. [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 18 (1 ULg)
See detailX-Ray Emissions from Jupiter
Gladstone, G.; Waite, J.; Grodent, Denis ULg et al

Conference (2001, May 29)

X-ray emissions from Jupiter have been observed for over 20~years. Jovian x-ray emissions are associated with the high-latitude aurora and with solar fluorescence and/or an energetic particle source at ... [more ▼]

X-ray emissions from Jupiter have been observed for over 20~years. Jovian x-ray emissions are associated with the high-latitude aurora and with solar fluorescence and/or an energetic particle source at low-latitudes as identified by past Einstein and ROSAT observations. Enhanced auroral x-rays were also observed to be associated with the impact of Comet Shoemaker-Levy~9. The high-latitude x-ray emissions are best explained by energetic sulfur and oxygen ion precipitation from the Jovian magnetosphere, a suggestion that has been confirmed by recent Chandra ACIS observations. Exciting new information about Jovian x-ray emissions has been made possible with Chandra's High Resolution Camera. We report here for the first time the detection of a forty minute oscillation associated with the Jovian x-ray aurora. With the help of ultraviolet auroral observations from Hubble Space Telescope, we pinpoint the auroral mapping of the x-rays and provide new information on the x-ray source mechanism. [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 6 (0 ULg)