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See detailHTLV-1 positive and negative T cells cloned from infected individuals display telomerase and telomere genes deregulation that predominate in activated but untransformed CD4+ T cells.
Zane, Linda; Sibon, David; CAPRARO, Valérie ULg et al

in International Journal of Cancer = Journal International du Cancer (2012), 131(4), 821-33

Untransformed HTLV-1 positive CD4(+) cells from infected individuals are selected for expressing tax and displaying morphological features consistent with telomere dysfunctions. We show that in resting ... [more ▼]

Untransformed HTLV-1 positive CD4(+) cells from infected individuals are selected for expressing tax and displaying morphological features consistent with telomere dysfunctions. We show that in resting HTLV-1 positive CD4(+) cells cloned from patients, hTERT expression parallels tax expression and cell cycling. Upon activation, these cells dramatically augment tax expression, whereas their increase in telomerase activity is about 20 times lower than that of their uninfected counterpart. Activated HTLV-1 positive CD4(+) but not uninfected CD4(+) or CD8(+) clones also repress the transcription of TRF1, TPP1, TANK1, POT1, DNA-PKc and Ku80. Both infected and uninfected lymphocytes from infected individuals shared common telomere gene deregulations toward a pattern consistent with premature senescence. ATLL cells displayed the highest telomerase activity (TA) whereas recovered a telomere gene transcriptome close to that of normal CD4(+) cells. In conclusion HTLV-1-dependent telomere modulations seem involved in clonal expansion, immunosuppression, tumor initiation and progression. [less ▲]

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See detailTelomere deregulations possess cytogenetic, phenotype, and prognostic specificities in acute leukemias.
CAPRARO, Valérie ULg; Zane, Linda; Poncet, Delphine et al

in Experimental Hematology (2011), 39(2), 195-2022

OBJECTIVE: Telomeres are protected by tightly regulated factors and elongated by telomerase. Short and/or deprotected chromosomes are recombinogenic and thereby cancer prone. MATERIALS AND METHODS ... [more ▼]

OBJECTIVE: Telomeres are protected by tightly regulated factors and elongated by telomerase. Short and/or deprotected chromosomes are recombinogenic and thereby cancer prone. MATERIALS AND METHODS: Together with the quantification of telomerase activity (TA), measuring telomere length (TL) and expression of the genes that govern telomere protection and elongation are useful for assessing telomere homeostasis. RESULTS: By these means we demonstrate that TL, hTERT, and TA are in the order acute myelogenous leukemia (AML) > T-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia (T-ALL) > B-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia (B-ALL) > T-ALL > AML, and B-ALL > AML > T-ALL. AML0 and AML3 display the lowest amounts of hTERT transcripts, and ALL and AML cells with cytogenetic abnormalities possess the shortest telomeres. hTERT expression includes phenotype-specific RNA maturation and correlates with TA but not with TL. A wide ratio of TA to hTERT expression between leukemia subtypes suggests phenotype-specific hTERT post-transcriptional deregulations. B- and T-ALL overexpress Ku70 and Pinx1, T-ALL PTOP and RAP1, and B-ALL TRF2, the expression of which is significantly higher in cases with abnormal karyotype. hTERT transcription and TL correlate with response to intensive chemotherapy, and hTERT and RAD50 are independent prognostic factors for survival. CONCLUSIONS: Each leukemia subtype possesses specific telomere dysregulations that rely on phenotype, karyotype, response to treatment, and survival. [less ▲]

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