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See detailChanges in major intracellular osmolytes in L-929 cells following rapid and slow application of hyperosmotic media.
Libioulle, Cécile ULg; Corbesier, L.; Gilles, Raymond ULg

in Comparative Biochemistry & Physiology Part A : Molecular & Integrative Physiology (2001), 130(3), 461-70

Cultured L-929 cells respond to media-made hyperosmotic (600 mOsmol/kg H2O) by addition of NaCl, sorbitol or proline by adjusting successively their intracellular level in different osmolytes: Na+, K ... [more ▼]

Cultured L-929 cells respond to media-made hyperosmotic (600 mOsmol/kg H2O) by addition of NaCl, sorbitol or proline by adjusting successively their intracellular level in different osmolytes: Na+, K+, amino acids and sorbitol. In the NaCl medium, Na+ and K+ are first to increase. Their concentration is then down-regulated while they are replaced by less disrupting osmolytes: amino acids and sorbitol. The amino-acid level is also adjusted with respect to the increase in sorbitol which starts only after 24 h, depending on the induction of aldose reductase. A similar evolution in the amount of these osmolytes is observed, with different time scales and amplitudes, depending on whether the osmotic shocks are applied abruptly or slowly, in a more physiological way. The interplay between the osmolytes is also different depending on their availability in the external medium. Such complex evolutions indicate that a cascade of interacting signals must be considered to account for the overall regulation process. It can hardly be fitted into a model implicating a single primary signalling event (early increase in ions or decrease in cell volume) as usually postulated. Also, the volume up-regulation is not significantly different in the different conditions, showing that it is not primarily dependent on the adjustment of the intracellular osmolarity which is reached immediately upon cell shrinkage and is maintained all over, independently of the availability and changes in nature of the osmolytes. [less ▲]

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See detailTolerance to Osmotic Shocks in Rats Kidney Cortex and Medulla
Gilles, Raymond ULg; Compère, Philippe ULg; el Goumzili, M. et al

in Tissue & Cell (1995), 27(6), 667-77

Kidney medulla cells of mammals have to cope with large changes in environmental osmolarity, a challenge most other mammalian cells never have to experience. In these last cells, application of osmotic ... [more ▼]

Kidney medulla cells of mammals have to cope with large changes in environmental osmolarity, a challenge most other mammalian cells never have to experience. In these last cells, application of osmotic shocks induces dramatic modifications in chromatin organization. The present paper reports on the changes of medulla cell chromatin in situ, in rat kidney slices submitted to osmotic challenges and in vitro, on preparations of extracted chromatin submitted to changes in environmental ion concentrations. Our results show that the chromatin of kidney medulla cells: (1) does not behave differently from the other mammalian chromatins when submitted in situ or in vitro to osmotic challenges; (2) presents in vitro physico-chemical characteristics similar to those of the other mammalian chromatins; and (3) is protected in vitro, as the other mammalian chromatins, from the disrupting effects of increases in inorganic ion concentrations by different compensatory organic solutes. The ability of kidney medulla cells to adapt to large increases in osmolarity could thus be related to a rapid control of the level of such compounds rather than to some rather specific, intrinsic molecular adaptations of macromolecules. [less ▲]

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See detailEffect of high osmolarity acclimation on tolerance to hyperosmotic shocks in L929 cultured cells.
Gilles, Raymond ULg; Belkhir, M.; Compère, Philippe ULg et al

in Tissue & Cell (1995), 27(6), 679-687

Application of abrupt, large hyperosmotic shocks induces in L929 cultured cells changes similar to those previously described in other cell types, notably a hypercondensation of the nuclear chromatin ... [more ▼]

Application of abrupt, large hyperosmotic shocks induces in L929 cultured cells changes similar to those previously described in other cell types, notably a hypercondensation of the nuclear chromatin. This paper shows that; 1) this phenomenon is concomitant with a complete disappearance of deoxyribonucleic acid, as visualized by immunogold labelling, from the nucleoplasmic spaces; 2) acclimation to high osmolarities (600 mOsm) by addition to the culture medium of NaCl, sorbitol or proline protects the cells from these effects, which appear to be largely attenuated-acclimated cells also survive much better to the osmotic shock than do control cells and; 3) the best protection seems to be provided by sorbitol and NaCl. Proline acclimation is less effective. These effects are discussed in terms of increased tolerance to NaCl load induced at the level of different macromolecules by so-called 'compensatory' organic compounds. [less ▲]

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See detailEffets métaboliques des contractions musculaires volontaires et évoquées électriquement. Etude comparative par spectroscopie au P31 en résonance magnétique nucléaire
Vanderthommen, Marc ULg; Gilles, Raymond ULg; Carlier, P. et al

in Simon, L.; Pélissier, J.; Hérisson, C. (Eds.) Actualités en rééducation fonctionelle et réadaptation (1993)

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