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See detailSearch for ReCQL4 mutations in 39 patients genotyped for suspected Rothmund-Thomson/Baller-Gerold syndromes.
Piard, J.; Aral, B.; Vabres, P. et al

in Clinical genetics (2014)

Three overlapping conditions, namely Rothmund-Thomson (RTS), Baller-Gerold (BGS) and RAPADILINO syndromes, have been attributed to RECQL4 mutations. Differential diagnoses depend on the clinical ... [more ▼]

Three overlapping conditions, namely Rothmund-Thomson (RTS), Baller-Gerold (BGS) and RAPADILINO syndromes, have been attributed to RECQL4 mutations. Differential diagnoses depend on the clinical presentation, but the numbers of known genes remain low, leading to the widespread prescription of RECQL4 sequencing. The aim of our study was therefore to determine the best clinical indicators for the presence of RECQL4 mutations in a series of 39 patients referred for RECQL4 molecular analysis and belonging to the RTS (27 cases) and BGS (12 cases) spectrum. One or two deleterious RECQL4 mutations were found in 10/27 patients referred for RTS diagnosis. Clinical and molecular reevaluation led to a different diagnosis in 7/17 negative cases, including Clericuzio-type poikiloderma with neutropenia, hereditary sclerosing poikiloderma, and craniosynostosis/anal anomalies/porokeratosis. No RECQL4 mutations were found in the BGS group without poikiloderma, confirming that RECQL4 sequencing was not indicated in this phenotype. One chromosomal abnormality and one TWIST mutation was found in this cohort. This study highlights the search for differential diagnoses before the prescription of RECQL4 sequencing in this clinically heterogeneous group. The combination of clinically defined subgroups and next-generation sequencing will hopefully bring to light new molecular bases of syndromes with poikiloderma, as well as BGS without poikiloderma. [less ▲]

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See detailIRF6 Screening of Syndromic and a priori Non-Syndromic Cleft Lip and Palate Patients: Identification of a New Type of Minor VWS Sign.
Desmyter, L.; Ghassibe, M.; Revencu, N. et al

in Molecular Syndromology (2010), 1(2), 67-74

Van der Woude syndrome (VWS), caused by dominant IRF6 mutation, is the most common cleft syndrome. In 15% of the patients, lip pits are absent and the phenotype mimics isolated clefts. Therefore, we ... [more ▼]

Van der Woude syndrome (VWS), caused by dominant IRF6 mutation, is the most common cleft syndrome. In 15% of the patients, lip pits are absent and the phenotype mimics isolated clefts. Therefore, we hypothesized that some of the families classified as having non-syndromic inherited cleft lip and palate could have an IRF6 mutation. We screened in total 170 patients with cleft lip with or without cleft palate (CL/P): 75 were syndromic and 95 were a priori part of multiplex non-syndromic families. A mutation was identified in 62.7 and 3.3% of the patients, respectively. In one of the 95 a priori non-syndromic families with an autosomal dominant inheritance (family B), new insights into the family history revealed the presence, at birth, of lower lip pits in two members and the diagnosis was revised as VWS. A novel lower lip sign was observed in one individual in this family. Interestingly, a similar lower lip sign was also observed in one individual from a 2nd family (family A). This consists of 2 nodules below the lower lip on the external side. In a 3rd multiplex family (family C), a de novo mutation was identified in an a priori non-syndromic CL/P patient. Re-examination after mutation screening revealed the presence of a tiny pit-looking lesion on the inner side of the lower lip leading to a revised diagnosis of VWS. On the basis of this data, we conclude that IRF6 should be screened when any doubt rises about the normality of the lower lip and also if a non-syndromic cleft lip patient (with or without cleft palate) has a family history suggestive of autosomal dominant inheritance. [less ▲]

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See detailBony syngnathia, vertebral segmentation defect, coloboma, microcephaly and mental retardation: confirmation of Dobrow syndrome and review of syndromal syngnathias
Verloes, Alain ULg; Raoul, M.; Genevieve, D. et al

in Clinical Dysmorphology (2004), 13(4), 205-211

Congenital bony fusion of the maxilla and mandible is a rare condition. Two classifications were previously proposed dealing exclusively with craniofacial malformations. Most of the reported cases to date ... [more ▼]

Congenital bony fusion of the maxilla and mandible is a rare condition. Two classifications were previously proposed dealing exclusively with craniofacial malformations. Most of the reported cases to date represent either aglossia-aclactylia or hemifacial microsomia syndromes. We report a young girl with bony syngnathia associated with multiple defects (severe microcephaly, coloboma, vertebral segmentation defects), growth and mental delay. This patient is very similar to the patient described by Dobrow in 1983 and confirms the existence of this extremely rare disorder. (C) 2004 Lippincott Williams Wilkins. [less ▲]

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