References of "Gavini, Françoise"
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See detailBifidobacterium pseudolongum are efficient indicators of animal fecal contamination in raw milk cheese industry
Delcenserie, Véronique ULg; Gavini, Françoise; China, Bernard et al

in BMC Microbiology (2011), 11(178),

Background: The contamination of raw milk cheeses (St-Marcellin and Brie) from two plants in France was studied at several steps of production (raw milk, after addition of rennet - St-Marcellin - or after ... [more ▼]

Background: The contamination of raw milk cheeses (St-Marcellin and Brie) from two plants in France was studied at several steps of production (raw milk, after addition of rennet - St-Marcellin - or after second maturation - Brie -, after removal from the mold and during ripening) using bifidobacteria as indicators of fecal contamination. Results: Bifidobacterium semi-quantitative counts were compared using PCR-RFLP and real-time PCR. B. pseudolongum were detected in 77% (PCR-RFLP; 1.75 to 2.29 log cfu ml-1) at the different production steps) and 68% (real-time PCR; 2.19 to 2.73 log cfu ml-1) of St-Marcellin samples and in 87% (PCR-RFLP; 1.17 to 2.40 log cfu ml-1) of Brie cheeses samples. Mean counts of B. pseudolongum remained stable along both processes. Two other populations of bifidobacteria were detected during the ripening stage of St-Marcellin, respectively in 61% and 18% of the samples (PCR-RFLP). The presence of these populations explains the increase in total bifidobacteria observed during ripening. Further characterization of these populations is currently under process. Forty-eight percents (St-Marcellin) and 70 % (Brie) of the samples were B. pseudolongum positive / E. coli negative while only 10 % (St-Marcellin) and 3 % (Brie) were B. pseudolongum negative / E. coli positive. Conclusions: The increase of total bifidobacteria during ripening in Marcellin’s process does not allow their use as fecal indicator. The presence of B. pseudolongum along the processes defined a contamination from animal origin since this species is predominant in cow dung and has never been isolated in human feces. B. pseudolongum was more sensitive as an indicator than E. coli along the two different cheese processes. B. pseudolongum should be used as fecal indicator rather than E. coli to assess the quality of raw milk and raw milk cheeses. Results: Bifidobacterium semi-quantitative counts were compared using PCR-RFLP and real-time PCR. Bif. pseudolongum were detected in 77% (PCR-RFLP; 1.75 to 2.29 log cfu ml-1) at the different production steps) and 68% (real-time PCR; 2.19 to 2.73 log cfu ml-1) of St-Marcellin samples and in 87% (PCR-RFLP; 1.17 to 2. 40 log cfu ml-1) of Brie cheeses samples. Mean counts of Bif. pseudolongum remained stable along both processes. Two other populations of bifidobacteria were detected during the ripening stage of St-Marcellin, respectively in 61% and 18% of the samples (PCR-RFLP). The presence of these populations explains the increase in total bifidobacteria observed during ripening. Further identification of these species is currently under process. Forty-eight percents (St-Marcellin) and 70 % (Brie) of the samples were Bif. pseudolongum positive / E. coli negative while only 10 % (St-Marcellin) and 3 % (Brie) were Bif. pseudolongum negative / E. coli positive. Conclusions: The increase of total bifidobacteria during ripening in Marcellin’s process does not allow their use as fecal indicator. The presence of Bif. pseudolongum along the processes defined a contamination from animal origin since this species is predominant in cow dung and has never been isolated in human feces. Bif. pseudolongum was more sensitive as an indicator than E. coli along the two different cheese processes. Bif. pseudolongum should be used as fecal indicator rather than E. coli to assess the quality of raw milk and raw milk cheeses. [less ▲]

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See detailBifidobacteria as indicators of faecal contamination along a sheep meat production chain
Delcenserie, Véronique ULg; Loncaric, D.; Bonaparte, Christine et al

in Journal of Applied Microbiology (2008), 104(1), 276-284

Aims: The potential use of bifidobacteria as indicators for faecal contamination was studied along a sheep meat production and processing chain. The levels of bifidobacteria were compared with those of ... [more ▼]

Aims: The potential use of bifidobacteria as indicators for faecal contamination was studied along a sheep meat production and processing chain. The levels of bifidobacteria were compared with those of Escherichia coli. Total viable counts were followed along the chain (244 samples). Methods and Results: Forty-three per cent of the samples contained bifidobacteria, of which 15% were solely detected using a PCR method based on the hsp60 gene and not by a culture-based method. Bifidobacteria were detected in only three of nine sheep faeces samples using one or the other method. However, carcasses (types C and E) were highly contaminated. These sample types (30% and 28%, respectively) were positive for bifidobacteria and negative for E. coli. The species Bifidobacterium pseudolongum and Bif. thermophilum, isolated from faecal samples, were predominant. Bifidobacterium choerinum were found in C, D, E and F sample types. Conclusions: Bifidobacteria were shown more efficient than E. coli in carcasses samples. The presence of Bif. choerinum suggested a faecal pork contamination. Significance and Impact of the Study: Detection and identification of bifidobacteria, in correlation with E. coli counting, should improve hygiene quality of mutton processing chains. [less ▲]

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See detailDescription of a new species, Bifidobacterium crudilactis sp. nov., isolated from raw milk and raw milk cheeses.
Delcenserie, Véronique ULg; Gavini, Françoise; Beerens, Henri et al

in Systematic & Applied Microbiology (2007), 30(5), 381-9

A new Bifidobacterium species is described based on the study of ten Gram-positive strains with fructose-6-phosphate phosphoketolase activity. They are part of a phenotypic group comprising 141 strains ... [more ▼]

A new Bifidobacterium species is described based on the study of ten Gram-positive strains with fructose-6-phosphate phosphoketolase activity. They are part of a phenotypic group comprising 141 strains isolated from raw milk and raw milk cheeses in French raw milk cheese factories. This group was separated by a numerical analysis based on API 50CH, API 32A tests and growth at 46 degrees C. A strong similarity of 16S rRNA sequences (99.8%) was shown between strain FR62/b/3(T) and Bifidobacterium psychraerophilum LMG 21775(T). However, low DNA-DNA relatedness was observed between their DNAs (31%). The new isolates are able to grow at low temperatures (all ten strains up to 5 degrees C) and strain FR62/b/3(T) grows under aerobic conditions, as does B. psychraerophilum. However, contrary to B. psychraerophilum, they do not ferment L-arabinose, D-xylose, arbutin or melezitose, but they do acidify lactose. The DNA G+C content of FR62/b/3(T) is 56.4mol%. Therefore, the name Bifidobacterium crudilactis sp. nov. is proposed, with its type strain being FR62/b/3(T) (=LMG 23609(T)=CNCM I-3342(T)). [less ▲]

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See detailA PCR method for detection of bifidobacteria in raw milk and raw milk cheese: comparison with culture-based methods
Delcenserie, Véronique ULg; Bechoux, Nathalie ULg; China, Bernard et al

in Journal of Microbiological Methods (2005), 61(1), 55-67

Bifidobacteria are well known for their beneficial effects on health and are used as probiotics in food and pharmaceutical products. As they form one of the most important groups in both human and animal ... [more ▼]

Bifidobacteria are well known for their beneficial effects on health and are used as probiotics in food and pharmaceutical products. As they form one of the most important groups in both human and animal feces, their use as fecal indicator organisms in raw milk products has recently been proposed. Bifidobacteria species isolated in humans are different from those isolated in animals. It should therefore be possible to determine contamination origin (human or animal). A method of detecting the Bifidobacterium genus was developed by PCR targeting the hsp60 gene. The genus Bifidobacterium was identified by PCR amplification of a 217-bp hsp60 gene fragment. The degenerated primer pair specific to the Bifidobacterium genus used was tested for it specificity on 127 strains. Sensitivity was measured on artificially contaminated samples. Food can however be a difficult matrix for PCR testing since it contains PCR inhibitors. So an internal PCR control was used. An artificially created DNA fragment of 315 bp was constructed. The PCR detection method was tested on raw milk and cheese samples and compared with three culture-based methods, which comprised enrichment and isolation steps. The enrichment step used Brain Heart Infusion medium with propionic acid, iron citrate, yeast extract, supplemented with mupirocin (BHMup) or not (BH) and the isolation step used Columbia blood agar medium, supplemented with mupirocin (CMup) or not (C). The method using mupirocin at both enrichment and isolation steps and the PCR method performed from the culture in BHMup enrichment medium were shown to be the most efficient. No significant difference was observed in raw milk samples between PCR from BHMup and the culture-based method BHMup/CMup, while a significant difference was noticed between the same methods in raw milk cheese samples, which would favor using PCR. The results suggested that PCR on the hsp60 gene was convenient for a rapid detection of bifidobacteria in raw milk and raw milk cheese samples and that bifidobacteria always present throughout raw milk cheese production could be efficiently used as fecal indicators. [less ▲]

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See detailProposal for a new standard of faecal contamination indicator: Bifidobacterium
Delcenserie, Véronique ULg; China, Bernard; Gavini, Françoise et al

in Annales de Médecine Vétérinaire (2002), 146(5, OCT-NOV), 279-293

Micro-organisms of the genus Bifidobacterium are some of the most common micro-organisms in the human and animal intestinal tract. Bifidobacterium species are well known for their beneficial effects on ... [more ▼]

Micro-organisms of the genus Bifidobacterium are some of the most common micro-organisms in the human and animal intestinal tract. Bifidobacterium species are well known for their beneficial effects on the microflora. In this article, the interest for this microorganism is other. If this microorganism is found at different stages of the processing line, it indicates often a contamination of this processing line. An other characteristic is that Bifidobacterium species are different according to the host. It could be possible to determine the contamination origin (human or animal). That is an advantage over other bacteria such as the actual faecal contamination indicator, Escherichia coli. The aim of this project is to develop a test, using molecular genetic tools, to rapidly detect the most important Bifidobacterium species in food. If we know the contamination sources, the critical points will be pointed out and the control measures will be better. [less ▲]

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