References of "Gallez, Bernard"
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See detailDisruption in energy metabolism and mitochondrial function in a cellular model of inflammation-induced acute kidney injury
Quoilin, Caroline ULg; Mouithys-Mickalad, Ange ULg; Lécart, Sandrine et al

Poster (2013, September)

Sepsis is a very complex clinical condition characterized by stimulation of a systemic inflammatory response due to an infection. It has a profound deleterious effect on kidney functions leading to sepsis ... [more ▼]

Sepsis is a very complex clinical condition characterized by stimulation of a systemic inflammatory response due to an infection. It has a profound deleterious effect on kidney functions leading to sepsis-induced acute kidney injury (AKI). This failure seems to occur through complex mechanisms involving the immune system response, inflammatory pathways, cellular dysfunction and hemodynamic instability. To study the role of cellular energetic metabolism dysfunction and mitochondrial impairment in the occurrence of AKI during sepsis, we developed an inflammation-induced in vitro model using proximal tubular epithelial cells (HK-2) exposed to a bacterial endotoxin (lipopolysaccharide, LPS). This investigation has provided key features on the relationship between endotoxic stress and mitochondrial respiratory chain assembly defects. Firstly, we have shown that renal cells subjected to LPS are no longer capable to use adequately the available oxygen to maintain their metabolic functions. One hypothesis of this down-regulation suggests that impairment in mitochondria oxidative phosphorylation could prevent cells from using oxygen for adenosine triphosphate (ATP) production and potentially could cause sepsis-induced organ failure. Our study has then investigated this possible mitochondrial impairment to explain the decreased O2 consumption rate observed in LPS-treated HK-2 cells. After exposure to LPS, functionality of mitochondria was affected without any disturbance in their spatial organization. LPS seemed rather to interrupt mitochondrial oxidative phosphorylation by blocking cytochrome c oxidase activity. As a consequence, disruptions in the electron transport and the proton pumping across the system occurred, leading to a decrease of the mitochondrial membrane potential, an electron leakage as the form of superoxide anion, a release of cytochrome c in the cytosol and a decrease in ATP production. This irreversible defect in the production of cellular energy would support the concept that kidney failure in sepsis may occur on the basis of cytopathic hypoxia. [less ▲]

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See detailDual anticancer drug/superparamagnetic iron oxide-loaded PLGA-based nanoparticles for cancer therapy and magnetic resonance imaging
Schleich, N.; Sibret, Pierre ULg; Danhier, P. et al

in International Journal of Pharmaceutics (2013), 447(1-2), 94-101

We developed dual paclitaxel (PTX)/superparamagnetic iron oxide (SPIO)-loaded PLGA-based nanoparticles for a theranostic purpose. Nanoparticles presented a spherical morphology and a size of 240 nm. The ... [more ▼]

We developed dual paclitaxel (PTX)/superparamagnetic iron oxide (SPIO)-loaded PLGA-based nanoparticles for a theranostic purpose. Nanoparticles presented a spherical morphology and a size of 240 nm. The PTX and iron loading were 1.84 ± 0.4 and 10.4 ± 1.93 mg/100 mg respectively. Relaxometry studies and phantom MRI demonstrated their efficacy as T2 contrast agent. Significant cellular uptake by CT26 cells of nanoparticles was shown by Prussian blue staining and fluorescent microscopy. While SPIO did not show any toxicity in CT-26 cells, PTX-loaded nanoparticles had a cytotoxic activity. PTX-loaded nanoparticle (5 mg/kg) with or without co-encapulated SPIO induced in vivo a regrowth delay of CT26 tumors. Together these multifunctional nanoparticles may be considered as future nanomedicine for simultaneous molecular imaging, drug delivery and real-time monitoring of therapeutic response. [less ▲]

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See detailHypoxia is not required for human endometrial breakdown or repair in a xenograft model of menstruation.
Coudyzer, Pauline; Lemoine, Pascale; Jordan, Benedicte F. et al

in FASEB journal : official publication of the Federation of American Societies for Experimental Biology (2013), sous presse

Menstrual endometrial breakdown induced by estradiol and progesterone withdrawal is regularly attributed to vasospasm of spiral arteries causing ischemia and hypoxia. We investigated whether hypoxia ... [more ▼]

Menstrual endometrial breakdown induced by estradiol and progesterone withdrawal is regularly attributed to vasospasm of spiral arteries causing ischemia and hypoxia. We investigated whether hypoxia actually occurred in an in vivo model of menstruation. Three complementary approaches were used to look for signs of hypoxia in fragments of human functionalis xenografted to ovariectomized immunodeficient mice bearing pellets-releasing estradiol and progesterone, and then deprived of ovarian steroids. Hormone withdrawal 21 d after grafting induced menstrual breakdown and MMP expression within 4 d. Local partial oxygen pressure (pO2) was measured by electron paramagnetic resonance using implanted lithium phtalocyanine crystals. In mice with hormone maintenance until sacrifice, pO2 was low one week after grafting (14.8+/-3.4 mmHg) but increased twofold from the second week when tissue was largely revascularized. After 3 wk, pO2 was not modified by hormone withdrawal but was slightly increased on hormone reimpregnation 4 d after removal (34.7+/-6.1 mmHg) by comparison with hormone maintenance (27.1+/-8.6 mmHg). These results were confirmed using fluorescence quenching-based OxyLite measurements. In a further search for signs of hypoxia, we did not find significant HIF1-alpha immunostaining, nor pimonidazole adducts after hormone withdrawal. We conclude that hypoxia is not needed to trigger menstrual-like tissue breakdown or repair in human endometrial xenograft.-Coudyzer, P., Lemoine, P., Jordan, B. F., Gallez, B., Galant, C., Nisolle, M., Courtoy, P. J., Henriet, P., and Marbaix, E. Hypoxia is not required for human endometrial breakdown or repair in a xenograft model of menstruation. [less ▲]

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See detailESR spectroscopy for the study of an inflammation-induced AKI cellular model
Quoilin, Caroline ULg; Mouithys-Mickalad, Ange ULg; Gallez, Bernard et al

Poster (2012, November)

The kidney is faced to an impairment of oxygen extraction during sepsis which is well-known to be a risk factor for the development of acute kidney injury (AKI). Recent research activities in the ... [more ▼]

The kidney is faced to an impairment of oxygen extraction during sepsis which is well-known to be a risk factor for the development of acute kidney injury (AKI). Recent research activities in the mechanisms involved in the development of AKI in sepsis emphasize the central role of hemodynamic and inflammatory events. More particularly, two mechanisms are suggested to explain the inability of the injured kidney to extract oxygen: tissue hypoxia and cellular energetic metabolism dysfunction. Our working hypothesis of the pathophysiology of AKI is based on cellular respiratory dysfunction due to the inflammatory response inherent to sepsis. To study the mechanism of oxygen regulation in inflammation-induced acute kidney injury, we investigate the effects of a bacterial endotoxin (lipopolysaccharide, LPS) on the basal respiration of proximal tubular epithelial cells (HK-2) by ESR oximetry. This method has shown that HK-2 cells exhibit a decreased oxygen consumption rate when treated with LPS. Surprisingly, this cellular respiration alteration persists even after the stress factor was removed. We suggested that this irreversible decrease in renal oxygen consumption after LPS challenge is related to a pathologic metabolic down-regulation such as a lack of oxygen utilization by cells. This decrease was accompanied by increased nitric oxide (NO) production as measured by a spin trapping technique using ESR spectroscopy. This method is based on the trapping of NO by a metal-chelator complex consisting of N-methyl-D-glucamine dithiocarbamate (MGD) and reduced iron (Fe2+) forming a water-soluble NO-FeMGD complex detected by ESR. Since inducible NO synthase (iNOS) has been shown to play an important role in sepsis-induced AKI, the iNOS inhibitor L-NMMA (L-NG-monomethyl Arginine citrate) was tested in this in vitro model. L-NMMA blocked NO generation and permitted the HK-2 cells to recover a normal cellular respiration. Overall, ESR spectroscopy and the model of HK-2 cells exposed to LPS displays some key features of inflammation-induced acute kidney injury. [less ▲]

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See detailEndotoxin-induced basal respiration alterations of renal HK-2 cells: A sign of pathologic metabolism down-regulation
Quoilin, Caroline ULg; Mouithys-Mickalad, Ange ULg; Duranteau, Jacques et al

in Biochemical and Biophysical Research Communications (2012), 423(2), 350-354

To study the mechanism of oxygen regulation in inflammation-induced acute kidney injury, we investigate the effects of a bacterial endotoxin (lipopolysaccharide, LPS) on the basal respiration of proximal ... [more ▼]

To study the mechanism of oxygen regulation in inflammation-induced acute kidney injury, we investigate the effects of a bacterial endotoxin (lipopolysaccharide, LPS) on the basal respiration of proximal tubular epithelial cells (HK-2) both by high-resolution respirometry and electron spin resonance spectroscopy. These two complementary methods have shown that HK-2 cells exhibit a decreased oxygen consumption rate when treated with LPS. Surprisingly, this cellular respiration alteration persists even after the stress factor was removed. We suggested that this irreversible decrease in renal oxygen consumption after LPS challenge is related to a pathologic metabolic down-regulation such as a lack of oxygen utilization by cells. [less ▲]

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See detailEndotoxin-induced alterations in renal oxygen consumption: an ESR oximetry study
Quoilin, Caroline ULg; Grammenos, Angeliki ULg; Gallez, Bernard et al

Poster (2011, August)

The kidney, one of the most injured organs in critically ill patients, is faced with unique challenges for molecular oxygen regulation. Recent research activities in the pathophysiological mechanism of ... [more ▼]

The kidney, one of the most injured organs in critically ill patients, is faced with unique challenges for molecular oxygen regulation. Recent research activities in the pathophysiological mechanism of acute renal injury (ARI) emphasize the central role of hemodynamic and inflammatory events in septic shock. More particularly, two mechanisms have been postulated to explain the inability of the injured kidney to extract oxygen: tissue hypoxia and cellular energetic metabolism dysfunction. The present investigation was carried out to characterize the effects of bacterial endotoxin on the oxygen consumption of human tubular proximal cell line (PTC) by using the very sensitive electron spin resonance oximetry method. Oxygen consumption was shown to decrease quite markedly in cells treated with lipopolysaccharide (LPS) from 16.52 ± 2.51 (n=6) in the control group to: 12.94 ± 2.62 (n=3) in the short incubation time group (6h) and 10.86 ± 2.20 (n=3) in the long incubation time group (18h). This decrease in oxygen consumption in renal cells after LPS challenge may be in relation with a metabolic down-regulation. Renal energetic are deranged in sepsis not just because O2 delivery is impaired but perhaps also because the ability of cells to utilize available O2 is compromised. [less ▲]

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See detailDeficiency or inhibition of oxygen sensor Phd1 induces hypoxia tolerance by reprogramming basal metabolism.
Aragones, Julian; Schneider, Martin; Van Geyte, Katie et al

in Nature Genetics (2008), 40

HIF prolyl hydroxylases (PHD1-3) are oxygen sensors that regulate the stability of the hypoxia-inducible factors (HIFs) in an oxygen-dependent manner. Here, we show that loss of Phd1 lowers oxygen ... [more ▼]

HIF prolyl hydroxylases (PHD1-3) are oxygen sensors that regulate the stability of the hypoxia-inducible factors (HIFs) in an oxygen-dependent manner. Here, we show that loss of Phd1 lowers oxygen consumption in skeletal muscle by reprogramming glucose metabolism from oxidative to more anaerobic ATP production through activation of a Pparalpha pathway. This metabolic adaptation to oxygen conservation impairs oxidative muscle performance in healthy conditions, but it provides acute protection of myofibers against lethal ischemia. Hypoxia tolerance is not due to HIF-dependent angiogenesis, erythropoiesis or vasodilation, but rather to reduced generation of oxidative stress, which allows Phd1-deficient myofibers to preserve mitochondrial respiration. Hypoxia tolerance relies primarily on Hif-2alpha and was not observed in heterozygous Phd2-deficient or homozygous Phd3-deficient mice. Of medical importance, conditional knockdown of Phd1 also rapidly induces hypoxia tolerance. These findings delineate a new role of Phd1 in hypoxia tolerance and offer new treatment perspectives for disorders characterized by oxidative stress. [less ▲]

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See detailThe acidic tumor microenvironment promotes the reconversion of nitrite into nitric oxide: towards a new and safe radiosensitizing strategy
Frérart, Françoise; Sonveau, Pierre; Rath, Géraldine et al

in Clinical Cancer Research : An Official Journal of the American Association for Cancer Research (2008), 14(9), 2768-2774

PURPOSE: The biological status of nitrite recently evolved from an inactive end product of nitric oxide catabolism to the largest intravascular and tissue storage of nitric oxide (NO). Although low ... [more ▼]

PURPOSE: The biological status of nitrite recently evolved from an inactive end product of nitric oxide catabolism to the largest intravascular and tissue storage of nitric oxide (NO). Although low partial O(2) pressure favors enzymatic reconversion of nitrite into NO, low pH supports a nonenzymatic pathway. Because hypoxia and acidity are characteristics of the tumor microenvironment, we examined whether nitrite injection could preferentially lead to NO production in tumors and influence response to treatments. EXPERIMENTAL DESIGN: The effects of nitrite were evaluated on arteriole vasorelaxation, tumor cell respiration and tumor blood flow, oxygenation, and response to radiotherapy. RESULTS: We first showed that a small drop in pH (-0.6 pH unit) favored the production of bioactive NO from nitrite by documenting a higher cyclic guanosine 3',5'-monophosphate-dependent arteriole vasorelaxation. We then documented that an i.v. bolus injection of nitrite to tumor-bearing mice led to a transient increase in partial O(2) pressure in tumor but not in healthy tissues. Blood flow measurements failed to reveal an effect of nitrite on tumor perfusion, but we found that O(2) consumption by nitrite-exposed tumor cells was decreased at acidic pH. Finally, we showed that low dose of nitrite could sensitize tumors to radiotherapy, leading to a significant growth delay and an increase in mouse survival (versus irradiation alone). CONCLUSIONS: This study identified low pH condition (encountered in many tumors) as an exquisite environment that favors tumor-selective production of NO in response to nitrite systemic injection. This work opens new perspectives for the use of nitrite as a safe and clinically applicable radiosensitizing modality. [less ▲]

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See detailGlucocorticoids Modulate Tumor Radiation Response through a Decrease in Tumor Oxygen Consumption
Crokart, Nathalie; JORDAN, Bénédicte; BAUDELET, Christine et al

in Clinical Cancer Research : An Official Journal of the American Association for Cancer Research (2007), 15(13), 6305

Purpose: We hypothesized that glucocorticoids may enhance tumor radiosensitivity by increasing tumor oxygenation (pO2) through inhibition of mitochondrial respiration. <br /> <br />Experimental Design ... [more ▼]

Purpose: We hypothesized that glucocorticoids may enhance tumor radiosensitivity by increasing tumor oxygenation (pO2) through inhibition of mitochondrial respiration. <br /> <br />Experimental Design: The effect of three glucocorticoids (hydrocortisone, dexamethasone, and prednisolone) on pO2 was studied in murine TLT liver tumors and FSaII fibrosarcomas. At the time of maximum pO2 (tmax, 30 min after administration), perfusion, oxygen consumption, and radiation sensitivity were studied. Local pO2 measurements were done using electron paramagnetic resonance. The oxygen consumption rate of tumor cells after in vivo glucocorticoid administration was measured using high-frequency electron paramagnetic resonance. Tumor perfusion and permeability measurements were assessed by dynamic contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging. <br /> <br />Results: All glucocorticoids tested caused a rapid increase in pO2. At tmax, tumor perfusion decreased, indicating that the increase in pO2 was not caused by an increase in oxygen supply. Also at tmax, global oxygen consumption decreased. When irradiation (25 Gy) was applied at tmax, the tumor radiosensitivity was enhanced (regrowth delay increased by a factor of 1.7). <br /> <br />Conclusion: These results show the potential usefulness of the administration of glucocorticoids before irradiation. [less ▲]

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See detailBotulinum toxin potentiates cancer radiotherapy and chemotherapy
ANSIAUX, Reginald; BAUDELET, Christine; CRON, Greg et al

in Clinical Cancer Research : An Official Journal of the American Association for Cancer Research (2006), 12(4), 127683

PURPOSE: Structural and functional abnormalities in the tumor vascular network are considered factors of resistance of solid tumors to cytotoxic treatments. To increase the efficacy of anticancer ... [more ▼]

PURPOSE: Structural and functional abnormalities in the tumor vascular network are considered factors of resistance of solid tumors to cytotoxic treatments. To increase the efficacy of anticancer treatments, efforts must be made to find new strategies for transiently opening the tumor vascular bed to alleviate tumor hypoxia (source of resistance to radiotherapy) and improve the delivery of chemotherapeutic agents. We hypothesized that Botulinum neurotoxin type A (BoNT-A) could interfere with neurotransmitter release at the perivascular sympathetic varicosities, leading to inhibition of the neurogenic contractions of tumor vessels and therefore improving tumor perfusion and oxygenation. <br /> <br />EXPERIMENTAL DESIGN: To test this hypothesis, BoNT-A was injected locally into mouse tumors (fibrosarcoma FSaII, hepatocarcinoma transplantable liver tumor), and electron paramagnetic resonance oximetry was used to monitor pO(2) in vivo repeatedly for 4 days. Additionally, contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging was used to measure tumor perfusion in vivo. Finally, isolated arteries were mounted in wire myograph to monitor specifically the neurogenic tone developed by arterioles that were co-opted by the surrounding growing tumor cells. <br /> <br />RESULTS: Using these tumor models, we showed that local administration of BoNT-A (two sites; dose, 29 units/kg) substantially increases tumor oxygenation and perfusion, leading to a substantial improvement in the tumor response to radiotherapy (20 Gy of 250-kV radiation) and chemotherapy (cyclophosphamide, 50 mg/kg). This observed therapeutic gain results from an opening of the tumor vascular bed by BoNT-A because we showed that BoNT-A could inhibit neurogenic tone in the tumor vasculature. <br /> <br />CONCLUSIONS: The opening of the vascular bed induced by BoNT-A offers a way to significantly increase the response of tumors to radiotherapy and chemotherapy. [less ▲]

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See detailThalidomide radiosensitizes tumors through early changes in the tumor microenvironment
ANSIAUX, Reginald; BAUDELET, Christine; JORDAN, Bénédicte et al

in Clinical Cancer Research : An Official Journal of the American Association for Cancer Research (2005), 15(11), 743-750

Purpose: The aim of this work was to study changes in the tumor microenvironment early after an antiangiogenic treatment using thalidomide (a promising angiogenesis inhibitor in a variety of cancers ... [more ▼]

Purpose: The aim of this work was to study changes in the tumor microenvironment early after an antiangiogenic treatment using thalidomide (a promising angiogenesis inhibitor in a variety of cancers), with special focus on a possible normalization of the tumor vasculature that could be exploited to improve radiotherapy. Experimental Design: Tumor oxygenation, perfusion, permeability, interstitial fluid pressure (IFP), and radiation sensitivity were studied in an FSAII tumor model. Mice were treated by daily i.p. injection of thalidomide at a dose of 200 mg/kg. Measurements of the partial pressure of oxygen (pO2) were carried out using electron paramagnetic resonance oximetry. Three complementary techniques were used to assess the blood flow inside the tumor: dynamic contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging, Patent Blue staining, and laser Doppler imaging. IFP was measured by a wick-in-needle technique. Results: Our results show that thalidomide induces tumor reoxygenation within 2 days. This reoxygenation is correlated with a reduction in IFP and an increase in perfusion. These changes can be attributed to extensive vascular remodeling that we observed using CD31 labeling. Conclusions: In summary, the microenvironmental changes induced by thalidomide were sufficient to radio-sensitize tumors. The fact that thalidomide radiosensitization was not observed in vitro, and that in vivo radiosensitization occurred in a narrow time window, lead us to believe that initial vascular normalization by thalidomide accounts for tumor radiosensitization. [less ▲]

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