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See detailNociceptive and sympathetic innervations in the abaxial part of the cranial horn of the equine medial meniscus: an immunohistochemical approach
Nemery, Elodie ULg; Gabriel, Annick ULg; Piret, Joëlle ULg et al

in Journal of Anatomy (2016)

In athletic horses, diseases leading to lameness are of major importance due to the loss of performance and the resultant economic concerns. Although, in the hindlimb, stifle lesions are frequent due to ... [more ▼]

In athletic horses, diseases leading to lameness are of major importance due to the loss of performance and the resultant economic concerns. Although, in the hindlimb, stifle lesions are frequent due to the large and complex joint, and meniscal tears have been identified as the most common soft tissue injuries in this joint, little is known about the mechanism that causes the painful sensation and thus the lameness. The aim of our study was therefore to highlight any peripheral fibres involved in meniscal nociception in five healthy anterior horns of the equine medial meniscus, which is the most common locale reported for equine meniscal injuries. Immunohistochemical stainings were performed using antibodies against Substance P in order to identify nociceptive fibres; antibodies against tyrosine hydroxylase for detecting postganglionic sympathetic fibres; and against glial fibrillary acidic proteins in order to identify Schwann cells. Fundamentally, our work highlights for the first time the presence of nociceptive and sympathetic fibres in equine menisci. They were found in the abaxial part of the anterior horn of the equine medial meniscus. This study suggests thus that when the abaxial part is injured, the meniscus itself could be the source of pain. This finding provides a better understanding of the nociceptive and sympathetic innervation of the equine meniscus which could contribute towards improving the therapeutic strategies in order to alleviate pain in cases of equine meniscal injury. [less ▲]

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See detailFocus sur les astrocytes: cellules de la glie aux rôles multiples et importants dans le SNC. Le mouton est-il un excellent modèle animal ?
Salouci, Moustafa ULg; Gabriel, Annick ULg

in Revue de Médecine Vétérinaire (2016)

Les astrocytes représentent la population la plus importante de cellules gliales au sein du système nerveux central (SNC). Leur participation au fonctionnement du système nerveux central et leurs contacts ... [more ▼]

Les astrocytes représentent la population la plus importante de cellules gliales au sein du système nerveux central (SNC). Leur participation au fonctionnement du système nerveux central et leurs contacts avec les éléments neuronaux impliquent pour ces cellules des rôles très importants lors du développement du système nerveux, dans le cadre de différentes fonctions vitales et également lors de processus pathologiques. En plus d’être un soutien structurel, ces cellules jouent un rôle dans le métabolisme, la production et la libération de différentes molécules, l'entretien et le remplacement des neurones ; elles assurent également des fonctions immunitaires. La similitude entre l’être humain et le mouton en ce qui concerne certains aspects développementaux et anatomiques a donné de l'importance à ce dernier en tant que modèle expérimental animal permettant de mieux comprendre les rôles joués par les astrocytes dans les processus vitaux et pathologiques. Le but de cet article est de réaliser une synthèse sur le développent et les fonctions des astrocytes et leurs interventions lors de pathologie du SNC chez l’homme et chez le mouton. Enfin, l’utilisation du mouton en tant que modèle animal dans le cadre d’études expérimentales concernant les astrocytes est abordée. [less ▲]

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See detailMechanoreceptors in the anterior horn of the equine medial meniscus: an immunohistochemical approach
Nemery, Elodie ULg; Gabriel, Annick ULg; Grulke, Sigrid ULg et al

in Anatomia, Histologia, Embryologia (2016), 45

Lameness due to stifle and especially meniscal lesions is frequent in equine species. In humans, mechanoreceptors involved in proprioceptive function are well studied. Given the high incidence of meniscal ... [more ▼]

Lameness due to stifle and especially meniscal lesions is frequent in equine species. In humans, mechanoreceptors involved in proprioceptive function are well studied. Given the high incidence of meniscal injuries in horses, and the lack of information concerning them in equine menisci, our objective was to study these corpuscles in six healthy anterior horns of the equine medial meniscus, which is the most common localisation reported for equine meniscal injuries. Immunohistochemical stainings were performed using antibodies against high molecular weight neurofilaments and glial fibrillary acidic proteins. From a purely fundamental point of view, our work highlights for the first time the presence of Ruffini, Pacini and Golgi corpuscles in equine meniscus. They were found, isolated or in clusters and always located at the vicinity of blood vessels, at the level of the anterior horn of the equine medial meniscus. This morphological approach could serve as a basis for clinical studies, to evaluate the impact of these corpuscles on the poor sportive prognosis in equine meniscal tears. [less ▲]

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See detailEquine cadaver ligaments : A new promising source of stem cells
Shikh Al Sook, Mohamad Khir ULg; Gabriel, Annick ULg; Salouci, Moustafa et al

Scientific conference (2015, November 07)

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See detailDevelopmental profiles of GFAP-positive astrocytes in sheep cerebellum
Salouci, Moustafa ULg; Antoine, Nadine ULg; Shikh Al Sook, Mohamad Khir ULg et al

Poster (2015, July 16)

Astroglial cells make up the largest glial population in the brain and play a variety of vital functions in the development of the CNS. Defects in the development of these cells may induce various ... [more ▼]

Astroglial cells make up the largest glial population in the brain and play a variety of vital functions in the development of the CNS. Defects in the development of these cells may induce various neurodegenerative disorders and result in neural disease. The aim of this study is to investigate the normal development of astrocytes in sheep in various zones of the cerebellum during the different stages of gestation. 19 ovine fetuses, one lamb in the first postnatal week and three adult sheep. Sections of the cerebellum were embedded in paraffin and processed for immunohistochemistry for GFAP. The current study indicates that the first appearance of astrocytes occurs around the 8th week of gestation from restricted zones in the cerebellum. Bergmann cells were present around the 15th week of gestation. Our findings suggest that the maturation of astrocytes begins in the caudal parts of the cerebellum from their initial ventral regions to dorsal regions radially within the white matter followed by the more rostral parts of the cerebellum and that the astrocytes proliferate in the vermis before the cerebellar hemispheres. Our study provide a bases for future studies focusing on the pathological changes in the CNS of both human and sheep. [less ▲]

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See detailFeasibility of ultrasound-guided epidural access at the lumbo-sacral space in dogs
Liotta, Annalisa Pia ULg; Busoni, Valeria ULg; Carrozzo et al

in Veterinary Radiology & Ultrasound (2015), 56(2), 220-228

Epidural injections are commonly performed blindly in veterinary medicine. The aims of this study were to describe the lumbosacral ultrasonographic anatomy and to assess the feasibility of an ultrasound ... [more ▼]

Epidural injections are commonly performed blindly in veterinary medicine. The aims of this study were to describe the lumbosacral ultrasonographic anatomy and to assess the feasibility of an ultrasound-guided epidural injection technique in dogs. A cross sectional anatomic atlas of the lumbosacral region and ex vivo ultrasound images were obtained in two cadavers to describe the ultrasound anatomy and to identify the landmarks. Sixteen normal weight canine cadavers were used to establish two variations of the technique for direct ultrasound-guided injection, using spinal needles or epidural catheters. The technique was finally performed in two normal weight cadavers, in two overweight cadavers and in five live dogs with radiographic abnormalities resulting of the lumbosacral spine. Contrast medium was injected and CT was used to assess the success of the injection. The anatomic landmarks to carry out the procedure were the seventh lumbar vertebra, the iliac wings, and the first sacral vertebra. The target for directing the needle was the trapezoid-shaped echogenic zone between the contiguous articular facets of the lumbosacral vertebral canal visualized in a parasagittal plane. The spinal needle or epidural catheter was inserted in a 45° craniodorsal-caudoventral direction through the subcutaneous tissue and the interarcuate ligament until reaching the epidural space. CT examination confirmed the presence of contrast medium in the epidural space in 25/25 dogs, although a variable contamination of the subarachnoid space was also noted. Findings indicated that this ultrasound-guided epidural injection technique is feasible for normal weight and overweight dogs, with and without radiographic abnormalities of the spine. [less ▲]

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See detailEquine cadaver ligaments : A new promising source of stem cells
Shikh Al Sook, Mohamad Khir ULg; Gabriel, Annick ULg; Salouci, Moustafa et al

Poster (2015)

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See detailCharacterization of collagen fibrils after equine suspensory ligament injury: an ultrastructural and biochemical approach
Shikh Al Sook, Mohamad Khir ULg; Gabriel, Annick ULg; Salouci, Moustafa et al

in Veterinary Journal (2015)

Suspensory ligament (SL) injuries are an important cause of lameness in horses. The mechanical properties of connective tissue in normal and pathological ligaments are mainly related to the fibril ... [more ▼]

Suspensory ligament (SL) injuries are an important cause of lameness in horses. The mechanical properties of connective tissue in normal and pathological ligaments are mainly related to the fibril morphology, as well as the collagen content and types. The purpose of this study was to evaluate, using biochemical and ultrastructural approaches, the alterations in collagen fibrils after injury. Eight Warmblood horses with visible signs of injury in only one forelimb SL were selected and specimens were examined by transmission electron microscope (TEM). Collagen types I, III and V were purified by differential salt precipitation after collagen extraction with acetic acid containing pepsin. TEM revealed abnormal organization as well as alterations in the diameter and shape of fibrils after SL injury. The bands corresponding to types I, III and V collagen were assessed by densitometry after sodium dodecyl sulphate polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (SDS-PAGE). Densitometric analysis indicated that the proportions of type III and type V collagen were significantly higher (P <0.001) in damaged tissues compared to normal tissues with a mean increase of 20.9 and 17.3% respectively. Concurrently, a significant decrease (P <0.001) in type I collagen within damaged tissues was recorded with a mean decrease of 15.2%. These alterations could be the hallmark of a decrease in the tissue quality and mechanical properties of the ligament. This provides new insight for subsequent research on tissue regeneration that may lead to the development of future treatment strategies for SL injury. [less ▲]

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See detailCharacterization of collagen fibrils after equine suspensory ligament injury: an ultrastructural and biochemical approach
Shikh Al Sook, Mohamad Khir ULg; Gabriel, Annick ULg; Salouci, Moustafa et al

Poster (2014, October 19)

Suspensory ligament (SL) injuries are an important cause of lameness in horses. The mechanical properties of connective tissue in normal and pathological ligaments are mainly related to the fibril ... [more ▼]

Suspensory ligament (SL) injuries are an important cause of lameness in horses. The mechanical properties of connective tissue in normal and pathological ligaments are mainly related to the fibril morphology, as well as the collagen content and types. The purpose of this study was to evaluate, using biochemical and ultrastructural approaches, the alterations in collagen fibrils after injury. Eight Warmblood horses with visible signs of injury in only one forelimb SL were selected and specimens were examined by transmission electron microscope (TEM). Collagen types I, III and V were purified by differential salt precipitation after collagen extraction with acetic acid containing pepsin. TEM revealed abnormal organization as well as alterations in the diameter and shape of fibrils after SL injury. The bands corresponding to types I, III and V collagen were assessed by densitometry after sodium dodecyl sulphate polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (SDS-PAGE). Densitometric analysis indicated that the proportions of type III and type V collagen were significantly higher (P <0.001) in damaged tissues compared to normal tissues with a mean increase of 20.9 and 17.3% respectively. Concurrently, a significant decrease (P <0.001) in type I collagen within damaged tissues was recorded with a mean decrease of 15.2%. These alterations could be the hallmark of a decrease in the tissue quality and mechanical properties of the ligament. This provides new insight for subsequent research on tissue regeneration that may lead to the development of future treatment strategies for SL injury. [less ▲]

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See detailDevelopmental profiles of GFAP-positive astrocytes in sheep cerebellum
Salouci, Moustafa ULg; Antoine, Nadine ULg; Shikh Al Sook, Mohamad Khir ULg et al

in Veterinary Research Communications (2014)

Astroglial account for the largest glial population in the brain and play a variety of vital functions in the development of the central nervous system (CNS). An immunohistochemical study was performed in ... [more ▼]

Astroglial account for the largest glial population in the brain and play a variety of vital functions in the development of the central nervous system (CNS). An immunohistochemical study was performed in 19 ovine foetuses ranging from two to five months of gestation, one newborn lamb and three adult sheep. Using the anit-glial fibrillary acidic protein (GFAP) marker, several variations were found in the degree of GFAP positive (GFAP+) astrocyte distribution between the different zones in the cerebellum of sheep during brain development. Our study indicates that the first appearance of astrocytes from restricted zones in the cerebellum occurs around the eighth week of gestation. Bergmann cells were found to be present from around the 15th week of gestation onwards. Our findings suggest that the maturation of astrocytes begins in the caudal parts of the cerebellum, developing from their initial ventral regions to spread first to dorsal regions radially within the white matter, then followed by the more rostral parts of the cerebellum. Astrocytes were also found to proliferate in the vermis before appearing in the cerebellar hemispheres. [less ▲]

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See detailQuantitative Analysis of the Relative Abundance Changes Observed in Type I, III and V Collagen after Suspensory Ligament Injuries in Horses
Shikh Al Sook, Mohamad Khir ULg; Baise, Etienne ULg; Piret, Joëlle ULg et al

in Anatomia, Histologia, Embryologia (2014, July)

Introduction: The equine suspensory ligament (SL) injuries are an important cause of lameness in horses. Quantification of the relative abundance of the constitutive collagen types is essential to ... [more ▼]

Introduction: The equine suspensory ligament (SL) injuries are an important cause of lameness in horses. Quantification of the relative abundance of the constitutive collagen types is essential to investigate the differences between normal and injured tissues. The aim of this original study was to precisely determine the different collagen ratios both in injured and normal SL. This approach is a rational step towards understanding the intimate mechanisms of SL repair and regeneration at the molecular and histological levels. Methods: Five Warmblood horses with visible signs of injury in only one forelimb SL were selected. Specimens were obtained from the central core of lesions in damaged SLs and from the corresponding regions in other healthy SLs. Collagen types I, III and V were purified by differential salt precipitation after collagen extraction with acetic acid containing pepsin and they were examined by transmission electron microscopy. The bands corresponding to types I, III, and V collagen were assessed by densitometry after SDS-PAGE. SAS software (SAS Institute 2001) was used for all statistical analyses. Results: Based on ultrastructural observations, purified fibers of types I, III, and V collagens have been identified. The relative proportions of type III and type V collagen were significantly higher in the specimens‎ from damaged tissue compared with specimens from normal tissue (P < 0.001). These changes were concomitant with significant decrease in type I collagen in the injured tissue (P < 0.001). Conclusions: Our study showed that after SL injury, the relative abundance of the different collagen types is modified. These changes are the molecular hallmark of a decrease in tissue quality and mechanical properties of the ligament. It lays down the bases of subsequent researches on the tissue regeneration that may lead to the development of new treatment strategies for damaged tissues, particularly in the equine SL injuries. [less ▲]

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See detailMechanoreceptors in the anterior horn of the equine medial meniscus: an immunohistochemical approach.
Nemery, Elodie ULg; Gabriel, Annick ULg; Grulke, Sigrid ULg et al

Poster (2014)

Mechanoreceptors are “encapsulated sensory end-organs” involved in proprioceptive function. Given the high incidence of meniscal injuries in horses, the clinical interest in these mechanoreceptors ... [more ▼]

Mechanoreceptors are “encapsulated sensory end-organs” involved in proprioceptive function. Given the high incidence of meniscal injuries in horses, the clinical interest in these mechanoreceptors, particularly in the meniscus, and the lack of information concerning them in equine menisci, our objective was to study these corpuscles in the anterior horn of the equine medial meniscus, which is the most common localization reported for equine meniscal injuries. An immunohistochemical approach to detect Schwann cells and nerve fibres allowed us to localize and identify these corpuscles within the meniscus. Three types of mechanoreceptors were identified and localized between the abaxial quarter and the abaxial third of the meniscus: the Ruffini, Pacini and Golgi corpuscles. In conclusion, from a purely fundamental point of view, our work highlights for the first time the presence of MCR at the level of the anterior horn of the equine medial meniscus and proposes a classification based on specific immunocytochemical techniques. This morphological approach could serve as a basis for clinical studies, in order to evaluate the impact of these corpuscles on the poor sportive prognosis in equine meniscal tears. [less ▲]

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See detailDevelopment of Astrocytes in the Sheep Cerebellum
Salouci, Moustafa ULg; Antoine, Nadine; Shikh Al Sook, Mohamad Khir ULg et al

Scientific conference (2013, October 11)

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