References of "GRODENT, Patrick"
     in
Bookmark and Share    
Full Text
Peer Reviewed
See detailMotor fatigue measurement by distance-induced slow down of walking speed in multiple sclerosis
PHAN BA, Remy ULg; CALAY, Philippe ULg; GRODENT, Patrick ULg et al

in PLoS ONE (2012), 7(4), 34744

Background: Motor fatigue and ambulation impairment are prominent clinical features of people with multiple sclerosis (pMS). We hypothesized that a multimodal and comparative assessment of walking speed ... [more ▼]

Background: Motor fatigue and ambulation impairment are prominent clinical features of people with multiple sclerosis (pMS). We hypothesized that a multimodal and comparative assessment of walking speed on short and long distance would allow a better delineation and quantification of gait fatigability in pMS. Objectives: To compare 4 walking paradigms: the timed 25-foot walk (T25FW), a corrected version of the T25FW with dynamic start (T25FW+), the timed 100-meter walk (T100MW) and the timed 500-meter walk (T500MW). Methods: Thirty controls and 81 pMS performed the 4 walking tests in a single study visit. Results: The 4 walking tests were performed with a slower WS in pMS compared to controls even in subgroups with minimal disability. The finishing speed of the last 100-meter of the T500MW was the slowest measurable WS whereas the T25FW+ provided the fastest measurable WS. The ratio between such slowest and fastest WS (Deceleration Index, DI) was significantly lower only in pMS with EDSS 4.0-6.0, a pyramidal or cerebellar functional system score reaching 3 or a maximum reported walking distance !4000m. Conclusion: The motor fatigue which triggers gait deceleration over a sustained effort in pMS can be measured by the WS ratio between performances on a very short distance and the finishing pace on a longer more demanding task. The absolute walking speed is abnormal early in MS whatever the distance of effort when patients are unaware of ambulation impairment. In contrast, the DI-measured ambulation fatigability appears to take place later in the disease course. [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 70 (10 ULg)
Full Text
Peer Reviewed
See detailA corrected version of the Timed-25 Foot Walk Test with a dynamic start to capture the maximum ambulation speed in multiple sclerosis patients
Phan-Ba, Rémy ULg; CALAY, Philippe ULg; GRODENT, Patrick ULg et al

in NeuroRehabilitation (2012), 30(4), 261-266

Background : No clinical test is currently available and validated to measure the maximum walking speed (WS) of multiple sclerosis (MS) patients. Since the Timed 25-Foot Walk Test (T25FW) is performed ... [more ▼]

Background : No clinical test is currently available and validated to measure the maximum walking speed (WS) of multiple sclerosis (MS) patients. Since the Timed 25-Foot Walk Test (T25FW) is performed with a static start, it takes a significant proportion of the distance for MS patients to reach their maximum pace. Objectives : In order to capture the maximum WS and to quantify the relative impact of the accelerating phase during the first meters, we compared the classical T25FW with a modified version (T25FW+) allowing a dynamic start after a 3 meters run-up. Methods : Sixty-four MS patients and 30 healthy subjects performed successively the T25FW and the T25FW+. Results : The T25FW+ was performed faster than the T25FW for the vast majority of MS and healthy subjects. In the MS population, the mean relative gain of speed due to the dynamic start on T25FW+ was independent from the EDSS and from the level of ambulation impairment. Compared to healthy subjects, the relative difference between dynamic versus static start was more important in the MS population even in patients devoid of apparent gait impairment according to the T25FW. Conclusion : The T25FW+ allows a more accurate measurement of the maximum WS of MS patients, which is a prerequisite to reliably evaluate deceleration over longer distance tests. Indirect arguments suggest that the time to reach the maximum WS may be partially influenced by the cognitive impairment status. The maximum WS and the capacity of MS patients to accelerate on a specific distance may be independently regulated and assessed separately in clinical trials and rehabilitation programs. [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 118 (34 ULg)
Full Text
Peer Reviewed
See detailComparison of the Timed 25-Foot and the 100-Meter Walk as Performance Measures in Multiple Sclerosis
Phan-Ba, Rémy ULg; Pace, Amy; CALAY, Philippe ULg et al

in Neurorehabilitation and neural repair (2011), 25(7), 672-9

BACKGROUND: Ambulation impairment is a major component of physical disability in multiple sclerosis (MS) and a major target of rehabilitation programs. Outcome measures commonly used to evaluate walking ... [more ▼]

BACKGROUND: Ambulation impairment is a major component of physical disability in multiple sclerosis (MS) and a major target of rehabilitation programs. Outcome measures commonly used to evaluate walking capacities suffer from several limitations. OBJECTIVES: To define and validate a new test that would overcome the limitations of current gait evaluations in MS and ultimately better correlate with the maximum walking distance (MWD). METHODS: The authors developed the Timed 100-Meter Walk Test (T100MW), which was compared with the Timed 25-Foot Walk Test (T25FW). For the T100MW, the subject is invited to walk 100 m as fast as he/she can. In MS patients and healthy control volunteers, the authors measured the test-retest and interrater intraclass correlation coefficient. Spearman rank correlations were obtained between the T25FW, the T100MW, the Expanded Disability Status Scale (EDSS), and the MWD. The coefficient of variation, Bland-Altman plots, the coefficient of determination, and the area under the receiver operator characteristic curve were measured. The mean walking speed (MWS) was compared between the 2 tests. RESULTS: A total of 141 MS patients and 104 healthy control volunteers were assessed. Minor differences favoring the T100MW over the T25FW were observed. Interestingly, the authors demonstrated a paradoxically higher MWS on a long (T100MW) rather than on a short distance walk test (T25FW). CONCLUSION: The T25FW and T100MW displayed subtle differences of reproducibility, variability, and correlation with MWD favoring the T100MW. The maximum walking speed of MS patients may be poorly estimated by the T25FW since MS patients were shown to walk faster over a longer distance. [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 131 (45 ULg)