References of "Frederich, Michel"
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See detailAn Easy, Convenient Cell and Tissue Extraction Protocol for Nuclear Magnetic Resonance Metabolomics.
Matheus, Nicolas ULg; Hansen, Sylvain ULg; Rozet, Eric ULg et al

in Phytochemical analysis : PCA (in press)

INTRODUCTION: As a complement to the classic metabolomics biofluid studies, the visualisation of the metabolites contained in cells or tissues could be a very powerful tool to understand how the local ... [more ▼]

INTRODUCTION: As a complement to the classic metabolomics biofluid studies, the visualisation of the metabolites contained in cells or tissues could be a very powerful tool to understand how the local metabolism and biochemical pathways could be affected by external or internal stimuli or pathologies. Therefore, extraction and/or lysis is necessary to obtain samples adapted for use with the current analytical tools (liquid NMR and MS). These extraction or lysis work-ups are often the most labour-intensive and rate-limiting steps in metabolomics, as they require accuracy and repeatability as well as robustness. Many of the procedures described in the literature appear to be very time-consuming and not easily amenable to automation. OBJECTIVE: To find a fast, simplified procedure that allows release of the metabolites from cells and tissues in a way that is compatible with NMR analysis. METHODS: We assessed the use of sonication to disrupt cell membranes or tissue structures. Both a vibrating probe and an automated bath sonicator were explored. RESULTS: The application of sonication as the disruption procedure led to reproducible NMR spectral data compatible with metabolomics studies. This method requires only a small biological tissue or cell sample, and a rapid, reduced work-up was applied before analysis. The spectral patterns obtained are comparable with previous, well-described extraction protocols. CONCLUSION: The rapidity and the simplicity of this approach could represent a suitable alternative to the other protocols. Additionally, this approach could be favourable for high- throughput applications in intracellular and intratissular metabolite measurements. Copyright (c) 2014 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. [less ▲]

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See detailSome Interesting Sources of Plant Seed Oil
Paul, Aman ULg; Danthine, Sabine ULg; Blecker, Christophe ULg et al

Poster (2014, March 05)

There is a growing realization worldwide that biodiversity is fundamental to agricultural production and food security, as well as a valuable ingredient of environmental conservation. Flowering strips ... [more ▼]

There is a growing realization worldwide that biodiversity is fundamental to agricultural production and food security, as well as a valuable ingredient of environmental conservation. Flowering strips around the border of the crops serves as an important function to improve the biodiversity, besides this they play a major role in the ruminant nutrition and serve as a source of numerous beneficial compounds. It is well known that seeds store their food reserves for next generation mainly in the form of lipids; some of the seeds from these flowering strips could be an interesting source of lipids. These seed oils could play important role in food, pharmaceutical, cosmetics and other industries. The extraction of seed oil from four such plant species in Belgium namely Oregano (Origanum vulgare), Yellow Bedstraw (Galium verum), Common Self-heal (Prunella vulgaris) & Purple loosestrife (Lythrum salicaria) was carried out. Extraction was done by a cold extraction technique using chloroform/methanol in 2:1 ratio as solvent. Amount of oil extracted from Oregano, Yellow Bedstraw, Common Self-heal and Purple loosestrife was 22.58±0.03 %, 3.28±0.01 %, 14.84±0.12 % & 20.32±0.15 %. The fatty acid profiles of these four species were determined by gas chromatography (using methyl esters of their fatty acids); Oleic acid and Linoleic acid were found in all the four species, Gamma-linolenic acid was found in Purple loosestrife & Alpha-linolenic acid was found in Oregano and Common Self-heal plant species. Thermal behaviour of these four plant seed oils were analyzed using Differential Scanning Calorimetry (DSC), while some other physicochemical properties of the seed oils were also analyzed. These plant seed oils can be of great commercial importance. [less ▲]

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See detailField bordering flower strips as source of lipids
Paul, Aman ULg; Danthine, Sabine ULg; Stephanie, Heuskin et al

Poster (2014, February 07)

Field bordering flower strips not just only improves the biodiversity but also serves as a source of beneficial compounds. Some of the plants in these strips can be really interesting source of lipids ... [more ▼]

Field bordering flower strips not just only improves the biodiversity but also serves as a source of beneficial compounds. Some of the plants in these strips can be really interesting source of lipids, the oils extracted from their seeds can be important for food, pharmaceutical and cosmetics industries. Six species of plants from flowering strips in Belgium were investigated for their seed oil content. The oil from seeds was extracted by cold extraction technique using chloroform/methanol in 2:1 ratio as solvent. Oil extraction from seeds of Red Clover (Trifolium pratense), Rough Hawkbit (Leontodon hispidus), Cow Parsley (Anthriscus sylvestris), St John’s Wort (Hypericum perforatum), Common Yarrow (Achillea millefollium) and Birdsfoot Trefoil (Lotus corniculatus) plant species was done on wet weight which came out to be 7.89±0.11%, 11.86±0.07%, 14.78±0.31%, 24.20±0.02%, 20.08±0.15% and 7.04±0.12% respectively. The physicochemical properties of the extracted oils were analyzed. Some of these oils can be of great commercial value. [less ▲]

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See detailBiodiversity and ecosystem services: think functional!
Uyttenbroeck, Roel ULg; Hatt, Séverin ULg; Paul, Aman ULg et al

Poster (2014, February 07)

During the last years, several studies and reviews have considered the relation between biodiversity and ecosystem functioning or the provision of ecosystem services. Many studies found that plant ... [more ▼]

During the last years, several studies and reviews have considered the relation between biodiversity and ecosystem functioning or the provision of ecosystem services. Many studies found that plant functional traits and plant functional diversity (FD) are key drivers in this relation in terrestrial ecosystems. Researchers used different methods to obtain a gradient in plant FD to examine the effect on ecosystem services, going from observational studies of natural communities to synthetic assemblages. Furthermore, different methods exist to quantify plant FD going from simple functional trait richness to indices, distance-based frameworks and the division into FD components. In the AgricultureIsLife project, we set up a field experiment aiming to examine the biodiversity – ecosystem service relation in agricultural context. The experiment consists of perennial wildflower strips with different plant functional diversities in an arable field with conventional crop production. The wildflower strips were sown as synthetic assemblages but are subject to natural succession during the following years. We monitor the evolution of FD from the sowing to the establishment of a typical wildflower strip using Rhao’s quadratic entropy index to quantify FD. In addition, the flower strips will be monitored for four ecosystem services they are expected to provide: pollination, pest control, biodiversity support and provision of valuable compounds. [less ▲]

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See detail« Les plantes qui nous soignent : de la tradition à la médecine moderne »
Frederich, Michel ULg

Scientific conference (2014, January 20)

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See detailAntiplasmodial anthraquinones and hemisynthetic derivatives from the leaves of Tectona grandis (Verbenaceae)
Kopa, T.K.; Tchinda Tiabou, Alembert ULg; Tala, M.F. et al

in Phytochemistry Letters (2014)

Chemical investigation of the methanol extract of the leaves of Tectona grandis led to the isolation of one new anthraquinone derivative, grandiquinone A (3-acetoxy-8-hydroxy-2-methylanthraquinone) (1 ... [more ▼]

Chemical investigation of the methanol extract of the leaves of Tectona grandis led to the isolation of one new anthraquinone derivative, grandiquinone A (3-acetoxy-8-hydroxy-2-methylanthraquinone) (1), along with nine known compounds: 5,8-dihydroxy-2-methylanthraquinone (2), hydroxysesamone (3), 3-hydroxy-2-methylanthraquinone (4), quinizarine (5), betulinic acid (6), ursolic acid (7), tectograndone (8), corosolic acid (9) and sitosterol 3-O-β-d-glucopyranoside (10). Compounds 2 and 3 were isolated for the first time from the leaves of this plant, while 5 has never been reported from the genus Tectona. Hydroxysesamone (3) and tectograndone (8) were subjected to cyclisation and acetylation reactions to afford two hemisynthetic derivatives, 6,9-dihydroxy-2,2-(dimethyldihydropyrano)-3,4-dihydro-2H-benzo[g]chromene-5,10-dione (11) and acetyltectograndone (12) respectively, which are reported here for the first time. The ethyl acetate-soluble portion, some of the isolated compounds and hemisynthetic derivatives were evaluated for their antiplasmodial activity against the multidrug-resistant Dd2 strain of Plasmodium falciparum. Compound 3 showed a prominent activity, while 2, 8, 9, 11 and 12 showed significant in vitro anti-malarial activity. Compound 1 was weakly active in this test. The structures of the compounds were elucidated by spectroscopic methods and comparison of the data with the literature. [less ▲]

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See detailChemical composition, cytotoxicity and in vitro antitrypanosomal and antiplasmodial activity of the essential oils of four Cymbopogon species from Benin.
Kpoviessi, Salome; Bero, Joanne; Agbani, Pierre et al

in Journal of ethnopharmacology (2014), 151

ETHNOPHARMACOLOGICAL RELEVANCE: Cymbopogon species are largely used in folk medicine for the treatment of many diseases some of which related to parasitical diseases as fevers and headaches. As part of ... [more ▼]

ETHNOPHARMACOLOGICAL RELEVANCE: Cymbopogon species are largely used in folk medicine for the treatment of many diseases some of which related to parasitical diseases as fevers and headaches. As part of our research on antiparasitic essential oils from Beninese plants, we decided to evaluate the in vitro antiplasmodial and antitrypanosomal activities of essential oils of four Cymbopogon species used in traditional medicine as well as their cytotoxicity. MATERIALS AND METHODS: The essential oils of four Cymbopogon species Cymbopogon citratus (I), Cymbopogon giganteus (II), Cymbopogon nardus (III) and Cymbopogon schoenantus (IV) from Benin obtained by hydrodistillation were analysed by GC/MS and GC/FID and were tested in vitro against Trypanosoma brucei brucei and Plasmodium falciparum respectively for antitrypanosomal and antiplasmodial activities. Cytotoxicity was evaluated in vitro against Chinese Hamster Ovary (CHO) cells and the human non cancer fibroblast cell line (WI38) through MTT assay to evaluate the selectivity. RESULTS: All tested oils showed a strong antitrypanosomal activity with a good selectivity. Sample II was the most active against Trypanosoma brucei brucei and could be considered as a good candidate. It was less active against Plasmodium falciparum. Samples II, III and IV had low or no cytotoxicity, but the essential oil of Cymbopogon citraus (I), was toxic against CHO cells and moderately toxic against WI38 cells and needs further toxicological studies. Sample I (29 compounds) was characterised by the presence as main constituents of geranial, neral, beta-pinene and cis-geraniol; sample II (53 compounds) by the presence of trans-p-mentha-1(7),8-dien-2-ol, trans-carveol, trans-p-mentha-2,8-dienol, cis-p-mentha-2,8-dienol, cis-p-mentha-1(7),8-dien-2-ol, limonene, cis-carveol and cis-carvone; sample III (28 compounds) by beta-citronellal, nerol, beta-citronellol, elemol and limonene and sample IV (41 compounds) by piperitone, (+)-2-carene, limonene, elemol and beta-eudesmol. CONCLUSIONS: Our study shows that essential oils of Cymbopogon genus can be a good source of antitrypanosomal agents. This is the first report on the activity of these essential oils against Trypanosoma brucei brucei, Plasmodium falciparum and analysis of their cytotoxicity. [less ▲]

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See detailPhysicochemical properties of lipids extracted from Tenebrio molitor larvae
Danthine, Sabine ULg; Blecker, Christophe ULg; Paul, Aman ULg et al

Poster (2013, December)

Objectives: To determine the physicochemical properties of the oil obtained from Tenebrio molitor Larvae and explore its potential as edible oil. Methodology: Oils obtained from five batches of Tenebrio ... [more ▼]

Objectives: To determine the physicochemical properties of the oil obtained from Tenebrio molitor Larvae and explore its potential as edible oil. Methodology: Oils obtained from five batches of Tenebrio molitor Larvae were investigated. Among the samples, three were produced directly in the lab (3 different productions) and 2 were purchased from a local supplier. In addition to the total lipid content (solvent extraction), both FA (GC) and TAG (HPLC) profiles were determined. Thermal properties by DSC were also estimated. Results and conclusion: The fresh Larvae from the lab contained 52% of total proteins (% dry matter). Their total fat content was around 36% (% dry matter). The commercial samples contained more proteins, but less fat: around 58% of total proteins and 30% of total fat (% dry matter). All the extracted oils contained high amount of unsaturated fatty acids. However, the chemical composition and the thermal properties of the samples varied according to their origin. The level and quality of lipid content offer potential as a substitute of oilseeds. [less ▲]

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See detailGrasshoppers: Food Security & Nutrition
Paul, Aman ULg; Danthine, Sabine ULg; Frederich, Michel ULg et al

Scientific conference (2013, December)

Rising economies and rapid urbanization in developing countries, particularly in Asia, are creating shifts in the composition of global food demand, so it is necessary to explore new sources of food with ... [more ▼]

Rising economies and rapid urbanization in developing countries, particularly in Asia, are creating shifts in the composition of global food demand, so it is necessary to explore new sources of food with better nutritional profile. Among the alternative food that exists are the grasshoppers, about 80 species of which are consumed worldwide. Grasshoppers are not only rich source of proteins and lipids but also some important minor component like vitamins and minerals. Apart from being nutritionally superior to most conventional meats their production results in lower emission of greenhouse gases & ammonia, risk of zoonotic infections in humans is much lower, water requirement for production is much less and have higher feed conversion ratio. Edible species of grasshopper in Belgium were identified, attempts were made for the lab rearing of meadow grasshopper (Chorthippus parallelus) and fat as well as protein contents of meadow grasshopper (Chorthippus parallelus) & long winged conehead (Conocephalus discolor) were investigated. [less ▲]

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See detailSome natural products from aerial parts of Scrophularia imerethica
Getia, M; Mshvildadze, V; Dekanosidze, G et al

Poster (2013, June 17)

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See detailLes substances naturelles dans la lutte contre le paludisme
Frederich, Michel ULg

Scientific conference (2013, May 25)

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See detailFalsification des médicaments: mythe ou réalité ?
Marini Djang'Eing'A, Roland ULg; Fillet, Marianne ULg; Vancauwenberghe, Roy et al

Conference (2013, April 24)

La santé publique est de nos jours minée par la problématique des médicaments falsifiés ou de qualité inférieure, avec plusieurs conséquences sanitaires, économiques voire professionnelles. On estime à 7 ... [more ▼]

La santé publique est de nos jours minée par la problématique des médicaments falsifiés ou de qualité inférieure, avec plusieurs conséquences sanitaires, économiques voire professionnelles. On estime à 7% la part du marché pharmaceutique mondial que représenterait ce fléau; l’Afrique, l’Asie et de nombreux pays d'Amérique latine étant les régions les plus touchées avec plus de 30% de médicaments falsifiés. D’après l'OMS, plus de 50% des médicaments achetés à partir des sites internet illégaux sont contrefaits, annihilant très fortement les chances de succès thérapeutique. Ces médicaments viennent dans la plupart des cas des pays asiatiques et de l’Eurasie. Le trafic de faux médicaments est un crime contre l'humanité qui représente environ 50 milliards de dollars par an (10-15 % de plus que le marché de la drogue). Au travers de deux leçons, la situation de la falsification des médicaments sera présentée au grand public dans le but de le sensibiliser à ce fléau. La première leçon présentera la situation en Europe avec un accent sur la Belgique. La problématique du droit à la propriété intellectuelle et de l’encadrement législatif sera abordée, ainsi que la falsification des médicaments modernes et des phytomédicaments, ces derniers étant utilisés par plus de 40% de la population en Europe et aux Etats-Unis. Dans la seconde leçon sera abordée la situation vécue en Afrique. L’approvisionnement en médicaments de qualité par le partage de l’information sera présenté ainsi que les moyens analytiques à la disposition de ce continent pour combattre ce fléau. Des membres du Département de Pharmacie de l’Université de Liège, de l’Agence Fédérale des Médicaments et des Produits de Santé ainsi que du programme QUAMED (Quality Medicines for All) feront partager leur expérience sur cette question d’une brûlante actualité.  [less ▲]

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See detailUnusual Amino Acids and Monofluoroacetate from Dichapetalum michelsonii (Umutambasha), a Toxic Plant from Rwanda
Esters, Virginie ULg; Karangwa, Charles; Tits, Monique ULg et al

in Planta Medica (2013), 79

In the course of our investigations on Umutambasha in order to identify its convulsant principles, small quantities of monofluoroacetate were observed in stem bark, leaves, and fruits of this plant newly ... [more ▼]

In the course of our investigations on Umutambasha in order to identify its convulsant principles, small quantities of monofluoroacetate were observed in stem bark, leaves, and fruits of this plant newly identified as Dichapetalum michelsonii Hauman. Conclusive evidence for a monofluoroacetate presence came from its isolation from the freeze-dried extract of stem bark. Three free unusual amino acids, named N-methyl-α-alanine, N-methyl-β-alanine, and 2,7-diaminooctan-1,8-dioic acid, described for the first time in a plant, and known trigonelline were also isolated from the stem bark of D. michelsonii. Structure elucidations were mainly achieved by spectroscopic methods (1H-NMR, 2D-NMR, MS) and by comparison with authentic references. These unusual amino acids were detected by a fast, reliable TLC analysis in all our batches of Umutambasha, suggesting that they could be used for identification purposes in case of human or livestock intoxications. Finally, EEG recordings and behavioural observations performed in mice suggested that the convulsive patterns produced by Umutambasha are the consequence of monofluoroacetate presence in D. michelsonii. [less ▲]

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See detailIdentification and structure elucidation of four cannabimimetic compounds in seized products
Denooz, Raphaël ULg; VAN HEUGEN, Jean-Claude ULg; Frederich, Michel ULg et al

in Journal of Analytical Toxicology (2013), 37(2), 56-63

Since 2008, herbal mixtures with synthetic cannabinoid compounds have been sold as incense throughout the world. Although these new drugs are labeled as not for human consumption, these products are ... [more ▼]

Since 2008, herbal mixtures with synthetic cannabinoid compounds have been sold as incense throughout the world. Although these new drugs are labeled as not for human consumption, these products are smoked for their cannabis-like effects. This study reports the structural and spectral elucidation of four cannabimimetic compounds seized in Belgium: (4-methoxyphenyl)-1-(pentyl-1H-indol-3-yl)methanone (RCS-4), 1-(5-fluoropentyl)-3-(1-naphtoyl)indole (AM-2201), 2-(2-chlorophenyl)-1-(1-pentylindol-3-yl)ethanone (JWH-203) and 4-ethylnaphthalen-1-yl-(1-pentylindol-3-yl)methanone (JWH-210). Laboratory investigations were conducted by liquid chromatography (LC)–ultraviolet spectroscopy, high-resolution accurate mass detection and nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) analysis. This combined analytical approach allowed the detection of illicit compounds for which reference materials were not available. To facilitate identification and to complete existing databases, ultraviolet spectra and NMR data of all seized products are presented. Additionally, LC–quadrupole time-of-flight data were recorded to provide absolute identification. [less ▲]

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See detailPhenolic acid-rich extract of sweet basil restores cholesterol and triglycerides metabolism in high fat diet-fed mice: A comparison with fenofibrate
Harnafi, H.; Ramchoun, M.; Tits, Monique ULg et al

in Biomedicine & Preventive Nutrition (2013), 3(4), 393-397

Many spices are often added to foods as additives to enhance organoleptic qualities, such as flavor, aroma and color. Sweet basil (Ocimum basilicum L.) family of Lamiaceae is widely used in cooking for ... [more ▼]

Many spices are often added to foods as additives to enhance organoleptic qualities, such as flavor, aroma and color. Sweet basil (Ocimum basilicum L.) family of Lamiaceae is widely used in cooking for its culinary attributes. In this study, we aimed at the investigation of the hypocholesterolemic and hypotriglyceridemic activities of the basil phenolic acid-rich extract in high fat diet-induced hyperlipemic mice. Hyperlipemia was developed by a high fat diet containing cholesterol, lard and cholic acid. At the beginning of the experiment, animals were divided into three groups, one of them served as normolipidemic control group (NCG), the second hyperlipidemic control group (HCG) and the third basil-treated group (BTG). After 5 weeks of treatment, basil phenolic acid-rich extract significantly decreased plasma total cholesterol, triglycerides and LDL-cholesterol (-42%,-42% and -86%, respectively, P < 0.001). However, HDL-cholesterol was increased (+79%, P < 0.001). The extract reduced the atherogenic index and LDL/HDL-C ratio (-88% and -94%, respectively, P < 0.001). The reductions of liver total cholesterol and triglycerides were of -50% (P < 0.01) and -58% (P < 0.01), respectively. The hypolipemic effect of the phenolic acid-rich extract is comparable to that exerted by fenofibrate. This drug significantly reduced plasma total cholesterol, triglycerides and LDL-cholesterol (-25.5%, -51%, and -83.5%, respectively, P < 0.001) and increased plasma HDL-cholesterol (+136%, P < 0.001). On the other hand, fenofibrate significantly decreased atherogenic index and LDL/HDL-cholesterol ratio (-91% and -93%, respectively, P < 0.001). The fenofibrate decreased hepatic total cholesterol by 59.5% and triglycerides by 72%, respectively (P < 0.01). HPLC analysis led to identify four major compounds: caftaric acid, cafeic acid, chicoric acid and rosmarinic acid. In conclusion, the Sweet basil contains phenolic products that are able to lower hyperlipidemia and prevent atherosclerosis. © 2013 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved. [less ▲]

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See detailIdentification and Quantification of the Main Active Anticancer Alkaloids from the Root of Glaucium flavum
bournine, Lamine; Bensalem, Sihem; Wauters, Jean-Noël ULg et al

in International Journal of Molecular Sciences (2013), 14

Glaucium flavum is used in Algerian folk medicine to remove warts (benign tumors). Its local appellations are Cheqiq el-asfar and Qarn el-djedyane. We have recently reported the anti-tumoral activity of ... [more ▼]

Glaucium flavum is used in Algerian folk medicine to remove warts (benign tumors). Its local appellations are Cheqiq el-asfar and Qarn el-djedyane. We have recently reported the anti-tumoral activity of Glaucium flavum root alkaloid extract against human cancer cells, in vitro and in vivo. The principal identified alkaloid in the extract was protopine. This study aims to determine which component(s) of Glaucium flavum root extract might possess potent antitumor activity on human cancer cells. Quantitative estimation of Glaucium flavum alkaloids was realized by HPLC-DAD. Glaucium flavum effect on human normal and cancer cell viability was determined using WST-1 assay. Quantification of alkaloids in Glaucium flavum revealed that the dried root part contained 0.84% of protopine and 0.07% of bocconoline (w/w), while the dried aerial part contained only 0.08% of protopine, glaucine as the main alkaloid, and no bocconoline. In vitro evaluation of the growth inhibitory activity on breast cancer and normal cells demonstrated that purified protopine did not reproduce the full cytotoxic activity of the alkaloid root extract on cancer cell lines. On the other hand, bocconoline inhibited strongly the viability of cancer cells with an IC50 of 7.8 µM and only a low cytotoxic effect was observed against normal human cells. Our results showed for the first time that protopine is the major root alkaloid of Glaucium flavum. Finally, we are the first to demonstrate a specific anticancer effect of Glaucium flavum root extract against breast cancer cells, which can be attributed, at least in part, to bocconoline. [less ▲]

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See detailApplication de la résonance magnétique nucléaire (RMN) en toxicologie judiciaire
Denooz, Raphaël ULg; Frederich, Michel ULg; Charlier, Corinne ULg et al

in Acta Clinica Belgica (2013), 68(6), 470

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See detailIsolation, pharmacological activity and structure determination of physalin B and 5[beta],6[beta]-ep­oxy­physalin B isolated from Congolese Physalis angulata L.
Mangwala Kimpende, P.; Lusakibanza, M.; Mesia, K. et al

in Acta Crystallographica Section C: Crystal Structure Communications (2013), C69

Physalis angulata L., an annual herb from the Solanaceae family, is widely used in popular medicine in tropical countries to treat a variety of diseases. Two products, (X) and (Y), were isolated from a ... [more ▼]

Physalis angulata L., an annual herb from the Solanaceae family, is widely used in popular medicine in tropical countries to treat a variety of diseases. Two products, (X) and (Y), were isolated from a crude CH2Cl2 extract of dried Congolese Physalis angulata L. plants and crystallized from acetone for structure elucidation. Compound (X) corresponds to a physalin B dimer acetone solvate hydrate (2C28H30O9·C3H6O·0.22H2O), while compound (Y) crystallizes as a mixed crystal containing two physalin B mol­ecules which overlap with 5[beta],6[beta]-ep­oxy­physalin B, also known as physalin F, and one acetone mol­ecule in the asymmetric unit (1.332C28H30O9·0.668C28H30O10·C3H6O). Anti­­plasmodial activity, cytotoxic activity and selectivity indices were determined for crude extracts and the two isolated products (X) and (Y). [less ▲]

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