References of "Franco, Gianni"
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See detailFrontal lobe dementia presenting as personality disorder
Salmon, Eric ULg; Degueldre, Christian ULg; Franco, Gianni ULg et al

in Acta Neurologica Belgica (1996), 96(2), 130-134

The early differential diagnosis of frontal lobe dementia is particularly difficult because changes of personality or behaviour overwhelm intellectual and cognitive impairments. We report the case of a ... [more ▼]

The early differential diagnosis of frontal lobe dementia is particularly difficult because changes of personality or behaviour overwhelm intellectual and cognitive impairments. We report the case of a patient presenting with paranoid personality disorder who refused to collaborate in neuropsychological testing. Initial functional imaging showed frontal hypometabolism that served as an early marker of frontal lobe dysfunction. [less ▲]

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See detailCerebral Glucose Utilization During Stage 2 Sleep in Man
Maquet, Pierre ULg; Dive, Dominique ULg; Salmon, Eric ULg et al

in Brain Research (1992), 571(1), 149-53

Using [18F]fluorodeoxyglucose method and positron emission tomography, we performed paired determinations of the cerebral glucose utilization at one week intervals during sleep and wakefulness, in 12 ... [more ▼]

Using [18F]fluorodeoxyglucose method and positron emission tomography, we performed paired determinations of the cerebral glucose utilization at one week intervals during sleep and wakefulness, in 12 young normal subjects. During 6 of 28 sleep runs, a stable stage 2 SWS was observed that fulfilled the steady-state conditions of the model. The cerebral glucose utilization during stage 2 SWS was lower than during wakefulness, but the variation did not significantly differ from zero (mean variation: -11.5 +/- 25.57%, P = 0.28). The analysis of 89 regions of interest showed that glucose metabolism differed significantly from that observed at wake in 6 brain regions, among them both thalamic nuclei. We conclude that the brain energy metabolism is not homogeneous throughout all the stages of non-REMS but decreases from stage 2 SWS to deep SWS; we suggest that a low thalamic glucose metabolism is a metabolic feature common to both stage 2 and deep SWS, reflecting the inhibitory processes observed in the thalamus during these stages of sleep. Stage 2 SWS might protect the stability of sleep by insulating the subject from the environment and might be a prerequisite to the full development of other phases of sleep, especially deep SWS. [less ▲]

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See detailWR 22 is an Eclipsing Binary Star
Gosset, Eric ULg; Remy, Marc; Manfroid, Jean ULg et al

in Information Bulletin on Variable Stars (1991), 3571

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See detailCerebral Glucose Utilization During Sleep-Wake Cycle in Man Determined by Positron Emission Tomography and [18f]2-Fluoro-2-Deoxy-D-Glucose Method
Maquet, Pierre ULg; Dive, Dominique ULg; Salmon, Eric ULg et al

in Brain Research (1990), 513(1), 136-43

Using the [18F]fluorodeoxyglucose method and positron emission tomography, we studied cerebral glucose utilization during sleep and wakefulness in 11 young normal subjects. Each of them was studied at ... [more ▼]

Using the [18F]fluorodeoxyglucose method and positron emission tomography, we studied cerebral glucose utilization during sleep and wakefulness in 11 young normal subjects. Each of them was studied at least thrice: during wakefulness, slow wave sleep (SWS) and rapid eye movement sleep (REMS), at 1 week intervals. Four stage 3-4 SWS and 4 REMS fulfilled the steady state conditions of the model. The control population consisted of 9 normal age-matched subjects studied twice during wakefulness at, at least, 1 week intervals. Under these conditions, the average difference between the first and the second cerebral glucose metabolic rates (CMRGlu was: -7.91 +/- 15.46%, which does not differ significantly from zero (P = 0.13). During SWS, a significant decrease in CMRGlu was observed as compared to wakefulness (mean difference: -43.80 +/- 14.10%, P less than 0.01). All brain regions were equally affected but thalamic nuclei had significantly lower glucose utilization than the average cortex. During REMS, the CMRGlu were as high as during wakefulness (mean difference: 4.30 +/- 7.40%, P = 0.35). The metabolic pattern during REMS appeared more heterogeneous than at wake. An activation of left temporal and occipital areas is suggested. It is hypothetized that energy requirements for maintaining membrane polarity are reduced during SWS because of a decreased rate of synaptic events. During REMS, cerebral glucose utilization is similar to that of wakefulness, presumably because of reactivated neurotransmission and increased need for ion gradients maintenance. [less ▲]

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