References of "Foret, Ariane"
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See detailThe impact of visual perceptual learning on sleep and local slow wave initiation
Mascetti, Laura ULg; Muto, Vincenzo ULg; Matarazzo, Luca et al

in Journal of Neuroscience (2013)

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See detailFunctional neuroimaging of the reciprocal influences between sleep and wakefulness.
Jedidi, Zayd ULg; Rikir, Estelle ULg; Muto, Vincenzo ULg et al

in Pflugers Archiv : European journal of physiology (2011), 463(1), 103-9

The activity patterns adopted by brain neuronal populations differ dramatically between wakefulness and sleep. However, these vigilance states are not independent and they reciprocally interact. Here, we ... [more ▼]

The activity patterns adopted by brain neuronal populations differ dramatically between wakefulness and sleep. However, these vigilance states are not independent and they reciprocally interact. Here, we provide evidence that in humans, regional brain activity during wakefulness is influenced by sleep regulation, namely by the interaction between sleep homeostasis and circadian signals. We also show that, by contrast, regional brain activity during sleep is influenced by the experience acquired during the preceding waking period. These data reveal the dynamic interactions by which the succession of vigilance states support normal brain function and human cognition. [less ▲]

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See detailNeural Correlates of Human NREM Sleep Oscillations
Foret, Ariane ULg; Shaffii, Anahita ULg; Muto, Vincenzo ULg et al

in Hutt, Axel (Ed.) Sleep and Anesthesia (2011)

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See detailSpontaneous neural activity during human non-rapid eye movement sleep.
Mascetti, Laura ULg; Foret, Ariane ULg; Shaffii, Anahita ULg et al

in Progress in Brain Research (2011), 193

Recent neuroimaging studies characterized the neural correlates of slow waves and spindles during human non-rapid eye movement (NREM) sleep. They showed that significant activity was consistently ... [more ▼]

Recent neuroimaging studies characterized the neural correlates of slow waves and spindles during human non-rapid eye movement (NREM) sleep. They showed that significant activity was consistently associated with slow (> 140 muV) and delta waves (75-140 muV) during NREM sleep in several cortical areas including inferior frontal, medial prefrontal, precuneus, and posterior cingulate cortices. Unexpectedly, slow waves were also associated with transient responses in the pontine tegmentum and in the cerebellum. On the other hand, spindles were associated with a transient activity in the thalami, paralimbic areas (anterior cingulate and insular cortices), and superior temporal gyri. Moreover, slow spindles (11-13 Hz) were associated with increased activity in the superior frontal gyrus. In contrast, fast spindles (13-15 Hz) recruited a set of cortical regions involved in sensorimotor processing, as well as the mesial frontal cortex and hippocampus. These findings indicate that human NREM sleep is an active state during which brain activity is temporally organized by spontaneous oscillations (spindles and slow oscillation) in a regionally specific manner. The functional significance of these NREM sleep oscillations is currently interpreted in terms of synaptic homeostasis and memory consolidation. [less ▲]

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See detailInfluence of brain-derived neurotrophic factor val66met human polymorphism on declarative memory consolidation
Mascetti, Laura ULg; Foret, Ariane ULg; Matarazzo, Luca et al

Poster (2010, November 15)

The Brain-Derived Neurotrophic Factor (BDNF) is a neurotrophin which in the adult brain regulates long-term potentiation. In humans, valine (val) to methionine (met) substitution in the 5’ pro-region of ... [more ▼]

The Brain-Derived Neurotrophic Factor (BDNF) is a neurotrophin which in the adult brain regulates long-term potentiation. In humans, valine (val) to methionine (met) substitution in the 5’ pro-region of the BDNF protein is associated with poorer episodic memory. Neurons transfected with met-BDNF-Green Fluorescence Protein showed lower depolarization-induced secretion, while constitutive secretion is unchanged. Here, we hypothesized that the differences in BDNF release determined by this polymorphism would influence memory consolidation and that in comparison with the val/met (=val/met or met/met), val/val individuals would show higher memory performance and different brain responses during a 16h-delayed rather than immediate retrieval session. Participants encoded a series of neutral faces in the afternoon. Retrieval sessions took place one hour after the encoding session, and in the following morning, during the acquisition of functional Magnetic Resonance Imaging (fMRI) time series with a 3 Tesla Allegra scanner. During retrieval, studied faces and new ones were presented in random order. For each stimulus, the subjects indicated whether they could retrieve the encoding episode with (“Remember”), or without details (“Know”), or if they thought the item had not been presented during encoding (“New”). A repeated-measure ANOVA on discrimination index (d’) showed significant effects of group (F(1, 27)=8.65, p=0.007, n(val/val)=14, n(val/met)=15) and session (F(1, 27)=24.64, p=0.000), although the group by session interaction was not significant (F(1, 27)=1.29, p=0.267). fMRI results showed a significant genotype (val/val > val/met) by session (delayed > immediate retrieval) by memory type (Remember > Know) interaction in the right inferior occipital gyrus (x=42, y=-78, z=0, p=0.004, Z=3.77), the left inferior parietal lobule (x=-56, y=-40, z=48, p=0.013, Z=3.43), the posterior cingulate cortex (x=14, y=-42, z=42, p=0.019, Z=3.29) and the right hippocampus (x=28, y=-22, z=-22, p=0.03, Z=3.11). Val/val individuals demonstrate higher memory performance than met-carriers but the change in memory performance between immediate and delayed retests is similar in both allelic groups. In contrast, neural correlates of recollection change between sessions differently according to genotype: responses increase significantly more in val/val than in val/met individuals in brain areas involved in the retrieval, accumulation and binding of perceptual memory details during delayed, relative to immediate retest. These data suggest that activity-dependent BDNF release promotes memory consolidation during the first post-training hours. [less ▲]

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See detailInfluence of Brain-Derived Neurotrophic Factor val66met human polymorphism on declarative memory consolidation during sleep
Mascetti, Laura ULg; Foret, Ariane ULg; Matarazzo, Luca et al

Poster (2010, September 15)

Objectives The Brain-Derived Neurotrophic Factor (BDNF) is a neurotrophin which in the adult brain, regulates long-term potentiation and has been involved in the build up of the homeostatic sleep pressure ... [more ▼]

Objectives The Brain-Derived Neurotrophic Factor (BDNF) is a neurotrophin which in the adult brain, regulates long-term potentiation and has been involved in the build up of the homeostatic sleep pressure in rodents. In humans, valine (val) to methionine (met) substitution in the 5’ pro-region of the BDNF protein is associated with poorer episodic memory. Neurons transfected with met-BDNF-Green Fluorescence Protein showed lower depolarization-induced secretion, while constitutive secretion is unchanged. Here, we hypothesized that the differences in BDNF release determined by this polymorphism would influence sleep-dependent memory consolidation and that in comparison with the met-carriers (val/met or met/met), val/val individuals would show higher memory performance after one night of sleep rather than an immediate retrieval session. Methods Participants encoded a series of neutral faces in the afternoon. Retrieval sessions took place one hour after the encoding session, and in the following morning, after a night of polysomnographic-monitored sleep. During retrieval, studied faces and new ones were presented in random order. For each stimulus, the subjects indicated whether they could retrieve the encoding episode with (“Remember” response), or without details (“know” response), or if they thought the item had not been presented during encoding (“New” response). Results A repeated-measure ANOVA on discrimination index (d’) showed significant effects of group (F(1, 22)=4.66, p=0.042) and session (F(1, 22)=12.21, df=1, p=0.002). Although the group by session interaction was not significant (F(1, 22)=1.84, p=0.188), exploratory planned comparisons showed that at immediate retrieval, d’ was not significantly different between groups (val/val, d’ = 1.94±0.16; met-carriers, d’= 1.61±0.14; p>0.5). In contrast, during the second retest (the next day) d’ in the val/val group (d’=2.56±0.23) was significantly higher than in the met-carriers group (d’=1.88±0.21; p=0.041). Likewise, a between-session enhancement in d’ was detected only in the val/val population (p=0.003). Conclusion Val/val individuals demonstrate higher memory performance than met-carriers after a night of sleep but not at immediate retest. These data suggest that activity-dependent BDNF release promotes memory consolidation during the first post-training hours. Further analysis of the present data set will assess the respective effect of sleep and time on the BDNF-associated delayed memory enhancement. This study was supported by FNRS-FRIA, the University of Liège, and the QEMF. [less ▲]

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See detailSTEM CELLS IN THE ADULT RAT SPINAL CORD: PLASTICITY AFTER INJURY AND TREADMILL TRAINING EXERCISE.
Foret, Ariane ULg; Quertainmont, Renaud ULg; Botman, O. et al

in Journal of Neurochemistry (2010), 112(3), 762-772

ABSTRACT Ependymal cells located around the central canal of the adult spinal cord are considered as a source of neural stem cells (NSCs) and represent an interesting pool of endogenous stem cells for ... [more ▼]

ABSTRACT Ependymal cells located around the central canal of the adult spinal cord are considered as a source of neural stem cells (NSCs) and represent an interesting pool of endogenous stem cells for repair strategies. Physical exercise is known to increase ependymal cell proliferation, while improving functional recovery. In this work, we further characterized those endogenous NSCs within the normal and injured adult rat spinal cord and investigated the effects of treadmill training using immunohistochemical and behavioural studies. In uninjured untrained rats, Sox-2, a NSC marker, was detected in all ependymal cells of the central canal, and also scattered throughout the parenchyma of the spinal cord. Within the lesion, Sox-2 expression increased transiently, while the number of nestin-positive ependymal cells increased with a concomitant enhancement of proliferation, as indicated by the mitotic markers Ki67 and BrdU. Exercise, which improved functional recovery and autonomous micturition, maintained nestin expression in both injured and uninjured spinal cords, with a positive correlation between locomotor recovery and the number of nestin-positive cells. [less ▲]

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See detailContributions du sommeil a la consolidation mnésique
Maquet, Pierre ULg; Matarazzo; Foret, Ariane ULg et al

in Biologie Aujourd'hui (2010), 204(2), 139-143

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See detailSome facts about sleep relevant for Landau-Kleffner syndrome.
Mascetti, Laura ULg; Foret, Ariane ULg; Bonjean, Maxime et al

in Epilepsia (2009), 50 Suppl 7

Our understanding of the neural mechanisms of non-rapid eye movement sleep (NREM) is steadily increasing. Given the intriguing activation of paroxysmal activity during NREM sleep in patients with Landau ... [more ▼]

Our understanding of the neural mechanisms of non-rapid eye movement sleep (NREM) is steadily increasing. Given the intriguing activation of paroxysmal activity during NREM sleep in patients with Landau-Kleffner syndrome (LKS), a thorough characterization of commonalities and differences between the neural correlates of LKS paroxysms and normal sleep oscillations might provide useful information on the neural underpinning of this disorder. Especially, given the suspected role of sleep in brain plasticity, this type of information is needed to assess the link between cognitive deterioration and electroencephalography (EEG) paroxysms during sleep. [less ▲]

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