References of "Fonzé, Eveline"
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See detailStructural basis of the inhibition of class A beta-lactamases and penicillin-binding proteins by 6-beta-iodopenicillanate
Sauvage, Eric ULg; Zervosen, Astrid ULg; Dive, Georges ULg et al

in Journal of the American Chemical Society (2009), 131(42), 15262-15269

6-Beta-halogenopenicillanates are powerful, irreversible inhibitors of various beta-lactamases and penicillin-binding proteins. Upon acylation of these enzymes, the inhibitors are thought to undergo a ... [more ▼]

6-Beta-halogenopenicillanates are powerful, irreversible inhibitors of various beta-lactamases and penicillin-binding proteins. Upon acylation of these enzymes, the inhibitors are thought to undergo a structural rearrangement associated with the departure of the iodide and formation of a dihydrothiazine ring, but, to date, no structural evidence has proven this. 6-Beta-iodopenicillanic acid (BIP) is shown here to be an active antibiotic against various bacterial strains and an effective inhibitor of the class A beta-lactamase of Bacillus subtilis BS3 (BS3) and the D,D-peptidase of Actinomadura R39 (R39). Crystals of BS3 and of R39 were soaked with a solution of BIP and their structures solved at 1.65 and 2.2 A, respectively. The beta-lactam and the thiazolidine rings of BIP are indeed found to be fused into a dihydrothiazine ring that can adopt two stable conformations at these active sites. The rearranged BIP is observed in one conformation in the BS3 active site and in two monomers of the asymmetric unit of R39, and is observed in the other conformation in the other two monomers of the asymmetric unit of R39. The BS3 structure reveals a new mode of carboxylate interaction with a class A beta-lactamase active site that should be of interest in future inhibitor design. [less ▲]

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See detailCrystal structure of the Mycobacterium fortuitum class A beta-lactamase: structural basis for broad substrate specificity.
Sauvage, Eric ULg; Fonze, Eveline; Quinting, Birgit et al

in Antimicrobial Agents and Chemotherapy (2006), 50(7), 2516-21

beta-Lactamases are the main cause of bacterial resistance to penicillins and cephalosporins. Class A beta-lactamases, the largest group of beta-lactamases, have been found in many bacterial strains ... [more ▼]

beta-Lactamases are the main cause of bacterial resistance to penicillins and cephalosporins. Class A beta-lactamases, the largest group of beta-lactamases, have been found in many bacterial strains, including mycobacteria, for which no beta-lactamase structure has been previously reported. The crystal structure of the class A beta-lactamase from Mycobacterium fortuitum (MFO) has been solved at 2.13-A resolution. The enzyme is a chromosomally encoded broad-spectrum beta-lactamase with low specific activity on cefotaxime. Specific features of the active site of the class A beta-lactamase from M. fortuitum are consistent with its specificity profile. Arg278 and Ser237 favor cephalosporinase activity and could explain its broad substrate activity. The MFO active site presents similarities with the CTX-M type extended-spectrum beta-lactamases but lacks a specific feature of these enzymes, the VNYN motif (residues 103 to 106), which confers on CTX-M-type extended-spectrum beta-lactamases a more efficient cefotaximase activity. [less ▲]

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See detailCrystal structure of the sensor domain of the BlaR penicillin receptor from Bacillus licheniformis
Kerff, Frédéric ULg; Charlier, Paulette ULg; Colombo, Maria Louisa et al

in Biochemistry (2003), 42(44), 12835-12843

As in several staphylococci, the synthesis of the Bacillus licheniformis 749/I beta-lactamase is an inducible phenomenon regulated by a signal-transducing membrane protein BlaR. The C-terminal domain of ... [more ▼]

As in several staphylococci, the synthesis of the Bacillus licheniformis 749/I beta-lactamase is an inducible phenomenon regulated by a signal-transducing membrane protein BlaR. The C-terminal domain of this multimodular protein is an extracellular domain which specifically recognizes beta-lactam antibiotics. When it binds a beta-lactam, a signal is transmitted by the transmembrane region to the intracellular loops. In response, the hydrolytic activity of the BlaR large cytoplasmic L3 loop is induced, and a cascade of reactions is generated, leading to the transcription of the beta-lactamase gene. Here, we describe the crystal structure of the extracellular penicillin-receptor domain of BlaR (residues 346-601) at 2.5 Angstrom resolution in order to understand why this domain, whose folding is very similar to that of class D beta-lactamases, behaves as a highly sensitive penicillin-binding protein rather than a beta-lactamase. Two residues of the BlaR C-terminal domain, Thr452 and Thr542, modify the hydrophobic characteristic of the class D beta-lactamase active site. Both residues seem to be in part responsible for the lack of beta-lactamase activity of the BlaR protein due to the stability of the acyl-enzyme. Although further experimental data are needed to fully understand the transmembrane induction process, the comparison of the BlaR sensor domain structure with those of class D beta-lactamase complexes and penicillin-binding proteins provides interesting elements to hypothesize on possible signal transmission mechanisms. [less ▲]

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See detailCatalytic mechanism of the Streptomyces K15 DD-transpeptidase/penicillin-binding protein probed by site-directed mutagenesis and structural analysis
Rhazi, Noureddine ULg; Charlier, Paulette ULg; Dehareng, Dominique ULg et al

in Biochemistry (2003), 42(10), 2895-2906

The Streptomyces K15 penicillin-binding DD-transpeptidase is presumed to be involved in peptide cross-linking during bacterial cell wall peptidoglycan assembly. To gain insight into the catalytic ... [more ▼]

The Streptomyces K15 penicillin-binding DD-transpeptidase is presumed to be involved in peptide cross-linking during bacterial cell wall peptidoglycan assembly. To gain insight into the catalytic mechanism, the roles of residues Lys38, Ser96, and Cys98, belonging to the structural elements defining the active site cleft, have been investigated by site-directed mutagenesis, biochemical studies, and X-ray diffraction analysis. The Lys38His and Ser96Ala mutations almost completely abolished the penicillin binding and severely impaired the transpeptidase activities while the geometry of the active site was essentially the same as in the wild-type enzyme. It is proposed that Lys38 acts as the catalytic base that abstracts a proton from the active serine Ser35 during nucleophilic attack and that Ser96 is a key intermediate in the proton transfer from the Ogamma of Ser35 to the substrate leaving group nitrogen. The role of these two residues should be conserved among penicillin-binding proteins containing the Ser-Xaa-Asn/Cys sequence in motif 2. Conversion of Cys98 into Asn decreased the transpeptidase activity and increased hydrolysis of the thiolester substrate and the acylation rate with most beta-lactam antibiotics. Cys98 is proposed to play the same role as Asn in motif 2 of other penicilloyl serine transferases in properly positioning the substrate for the catalytic process. [less ▲]

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See detailRésistance bactérienne aux beta-lactamines
Charlier, Paulette ULg; Coyette, Jacques ULg; Dehareng, Dominique ULg et al

in Medecine Sciences : M/S (1998), 14(5), 544-555

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See detailPenicillin-binding proteins. Wall peptidoglycan assembly and resistance to penicillin: facts, doubts and hopes
Ghuysen, Jean-Marie ULg; Charlier, Paulette ULg; Coyette, Jacques ULg et al

in International Journal of Antimicrobial Agents (1997), 8(1), 45-60

As the protein sequence and structure databases expand, the relationships between proteins, the notion of protein superfamily, and the driving forces of evolution are better understood. Key steps of the ... [more ▼]

As the protein sequence and structure databases expand, the relationships between proteins, the notion of protein superfamily, and the driving forces of evolution are better understood. Key steps of the synthesis of the bacterial cell wall peptidoglycan are revisited in light of these advances. The reactions through which the D-alanyl-D-alanine depeptide is formed, utilized, and hydrolyzed and the sites of action of the glycopeptide and β-lactam antibiotics illustrate the concept according to which new enzyme functions evolve as a result of tinkering of existing proteins. This occurs by the acquisition of local structural changes, the fusion into mul-timodular polypeptides, and the association into multiprotein complexes. [less ▲]

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See detailUnexpected Influence of a C-Terminal-Fused His-Tag on the Processing of an Enzyme and on the Kinetic and Folding Parameters
Ledent, Philippe; Duez, Colette ULg; Vanhove, Marc et al

in FEBS Letters (1997), 413(2), 194-196

The addition of a poly-His C-terminal extension, designed to facilitate the purification of the protein, to the beta-lactamase of a thermophilic Bacillus licheniformis strain modified the site of action ... [more ▼]

The addition of a poly-His C-terminal extension, designed to facilitate the purification of the protein, to the beta-lactamase of a thermophilic Bacillus licheniformis strain modified the site of action of the signal peptidase. This resulted in the secretion of a protein with a different N-terminus, showing that this type of protein engineering might not always be as 'neutral' as generally assumed. (C) 1997 Federation of European Biochemical Societies. [less ▲]

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See detailPenicillin and Beyond: Evolution, Protein Fold, Multimodular Polypeptides, and Multiprotein Complexes
Ghuysen, Jean-Marie ULg; Charlier, Paulette ULg; Coyette, Jacques et al

in Microbial Drug Resistance : Mechanism, Epidemiology, & Disease (1996), 2(2, Summer), 163-175

As the protein sequence and structure databases expand, the relationships between proteins, the notion of protein superfamily, and the driving forces of evolution are better understood. Key steps of the ... [more ▼]

As the protein sequence and structure databases expand, the relationships between proteins, the notion of protein superfamily, and the driving forces of evolution are better understood. Key steps of the synthesis of the bacterial cell wall peptidoglycan are revisited in light of these advances. The reactions through which the D-alanyl-D-alanine depeptide is formed, utilized, and hydrolyzed and the sites of action of the glycopeptide and beta-lactam antibiotics illustrate the concept according to which new enzyme functions evolve as a result of tinkering of existing proteins. This occurs by the acquisition of local structural changes, the fusion into multimodular polypeptides, and the association into multiprotein complexes. [less ▲]

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