References of "Fontaine, M. A"
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See detailFracture and Bone Mineral Density in Hemodialysis Patients
Fontaine, M. A.; Albert, Adelin ULg; Dubois, Bernard ULg et al

in Clinical Nephrology (2000), 54(3), 218-26

AIM: The aim of this cross-sectional study was to determine in hemodialysis patients the pattern of low trauma fracture, the ability of dual X-ray absorptiometry (DXA) to discriminate between patients ... [more ▼]

AIM: The aim of this cross-sectional study was to determine in hemodialysis patients the pattern of low trauma fracture, the ability of dual X-ray absorptiometry (DXA) to discriminate between patients with and without fracture, and the magnitude, distribution and mechanism of bone loss. PATIENTS AND METHODS: Eighty-eight patients were studied. Bone mineral density (BMD) was measured by DXA at lumbar spine (LS), femoral neck (FN) and 3 radius sites (UD, MID and 1/3R). In 11 patients (12.5%), 16 fractures occurred and were predominant at the distal forearm and ribs. RESULTS: Patients with fracture had a significatively lower BMD Z-score at LS (-1.34 +/- 1.66 vs -0.42 +/- 1.23), at FN (-1.58 +/- 1.25 vs -0.60 +/- 1.01), at MID radius (-2.59 +/- 1.34 vs -0.93 +/- 1.76) and 1/3 radius (-1.62 +/- 1.60 vs -0.39 +/- 1.32). They also had a longer history of dialysis (113 +/- 64 vs 53 +/- 65 months). Prevalence of osteoporosis varied from 23% at LS to 50% at MID radius. CONCLUSION: Multiple regression analysis showed that there was no influence of gender, age, parathormone status and primary renal disease on BMD. However, at FN, UD, MID and 1/3 radius, a significantly negative correlation was found between length of dialysis and BMD Z-score. By contrast at LS, there was a positive correlation between age at onset of dialysis and BMD Z-score. Despite occurrence of fracture at the fistula forearm, BMD levels were similar in both arms. [less ▲]

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See detailInfluence of Estrogen Replacement Therapy on Endogenous Calcitonin Production Rates
Reginster, Jean-Yves ULg; Deroisy, Rita ULg; Fontaine, M. A. et al

in Gynecological Endocrinology : The Official Journal of the International Society of Gynecological Endocrinology (1992), 6(1), 65-71

Calcitonin is now a well-accepted therapy for inhibition of bone loss, both in the first years of menopause and in established osteoporosis. However, its exact role in the pathogenesis of that disease as ... [more ▼]

Calcitonin is now a well-accepted therapy for inhibition of bone loss, both in the first years of menopause and in established osteoporosis. However, its exact role in the pathogenesis of that disease as well as the interactions between calcitonin production and estrogen metabolism remain unsolved. In order to clarify the influence of estrogen replacement therapy (ERT) on calcitonin secretory capacity, we measured whole plasma immunoreactive calcitonin basal levels, metabolic clearance rates and production rates in a group of postmenopausal women, before and after a daily intake for 28 days of 0.625 mg/day of conjugated equine estrogens, and again 4 weeks after the withdrawal of that estrogen replacement therapy. No significant changes appeared in immunoreactive calcitonin or immunoreactive calcitonin metabolic clearance rate but the production rate significantly increased over the 28 days (mean +/- SEM, from 21.3 +/- 5.1 pg/ml to 25.2 +/- 5.9 pg/ml, p less than 0.05), and then decreased 4 weeks after therapy was withdrawn to the initial level (17.9 +/- 3.6 pg/ml). We concluded that estrogen replacement therapy significantly increases calcitonin secretory capacity. This confirms the interactions between calcitonin production and estrogen metabolism, and may provide an explanation concerning the mode of action of estrogen replacement therapy in prevention of postmenopausal bone loss. [less ▲]

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See detailEffects of Repetitive Administration of Growth Hormone-Releasing Hormone on Growth Hormone Secretion, Insulin-Like Growth Factor I, and Bone Metabolism in Postmenopausal Women
Franchimont, P.; Urbain-Choffray, D.; Lambelin, P. et al

in Acta Endocrinologica (1989), 120(1), 121-8

This study sought to determine whether GH response to synthetic GHRH was impaired in 13 postmenopausal (55-71 years) as compared with that in 8 eugonadal women and whether IGF-I and bone metabolism were ... [more ▼]

This study sought to determine whether GH response to synthetic GHRH was impaired in 13 postmenopausal (55-71 years) as compared with that in 8 eugonadal women and whether IGF-I and bone metabolism were consequently depressed. Thereafter, the effects of daily iv injections of 80-micrograms GHRH-44 for 8 days were studied in the same postmenopausal group. In addition to significantly higher basal IGF-I and osteocalcin levels (P less than 0.005) in eugonadal as compared with the postmenopausal women, the administration of one GHRH-44 injection resulted in significantly higher 120-min postinjection GH maximum peak and cumulative responses in the former group as well (P less than 0.005). Highly significant correlations were observed between 17 beta-estradiol plasma levels and either GH maximum peak or cumulative responses to GHRH-44 when both groups were pooled together, but not when considered independently. In postmenopausal women, a correlation was found between both age and duration of menopause and GH responses. Repeated GHRH-44 injections in postmenopausal women induced a significant increase in GH response (P less than 0.001) as well as in IGF-I levels from day 4 to 8. No phospho-calcium parameters were modified except for a significant rise in osteocalcin from day 2 to 8. These data indicate an age-related loss of sensitivity of somatotrope cells to GHRH-44 in postmenopausal women, partly corrected by repeated daily GHRH-44 injections. As a consequence of the GHRH-induced increase in GH secretion, IGF-I was also enhanced and may be responsible for a stimulatory effect on bone formation, as shown by the osteocalcin increase, uncoupled from bone resorption. [less ▲]

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See detailBiological and Clinical Assessment of a New Bisphosphonate, (Chloro-4 Phenyl) Thiomethylene Bisphosphonate, in the Treatment of Paget's Disease of Bone
Reginster, Jean-Yves ULg; Jeugmans-Huynen, A. M.; Albert, Adelin ULg et al

in BONE (1988), 9(6), 349-54

Several Biophosphonates have been used as therapeutic agents for Paget's bone disease. (Chloro-4 phenyl)thiomethylene-bisphosphonate (CIPsMBP) has recently been shown to have significant antiosteoclastic ... [more ▼]

Several Biophosphonates have been used as therapeutic agents for Paget's bone disease. (Chloro-4 phenyl)thiomethylene-bisphosphonate (CIPsMBP) has recently been shown to have significant antiosteoclastic activity while an affect of CIPsMBP on mineralization was only observed at high doses. We tested this drug for 6 months in 23 pagetic patients distributed in three groups. Gr 1 (n = 5) receiving 200 mg/day showed a decrease of serum alkaline phosphatase (SAP) to 42 +/- 4% (p less than 0.01) of initial value (100%) while hydroxyprolinuria/creatinuria ratio (OH/Cr) dropped to 69 +/- 8% of baseline. In 4 patients receiving 400 mg/day, SAP improved to 48 +/- 9% of initial value (p less than 0.01) and OH/Cr to 40 +/- 3% (p less than 0.01). In the last group (n = 14) receiving 200 mg/day for 3 months, and 400 mg/day thereafter up to the 6th month SAP decreased to 53 +/- 4% and OH/Cr to 62 +/- 6% of initial value (p less than 0.01). Clinical improvement was significant from the first month of treatment. No resistance (mean decrease of SAP lower than 30%) was recorded and no radiological or clinical evidence of mineralization defect appeared. The clinical and biological tolerance was excellent throughout the study. [less ▲]

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See detail1-Year Controlled Randomised Trial of Prevention of Early Postmenopausal Bone Loss by Intranasal Calcitonin
Reginster, Jean-Yves ULg; Denis, D.; Albert, Adelin ULg et al

in Lancet (1987), 2(8574), 1481-3

79 women who had been menopausal for less than 36 months and who had not received any form of treatment to prevent bone loss were randomly assigned to a 12-month regimen of calcium 500 mg/day or calcium ... [more ▼]

79 women who had been menopausal for less than 36 months and who had not received any form of treatment to prevent bone loss were randomly assigned to a 12-month regimen of calcium 500 mg/day or calcium 500 mg plus intranasal salmon calcitonin 50 IU/day for 5 days per week. After 12 months of treatment bone mineral density had decreased in the calcium-only group by a mean of 3.16 (SEM 0.6)% (p less than 0.01) but had increased in the calcium plus calcitonin group by 1.38 (0.8)% (NS). The difference in response between the two treatment groups was also highly significant (p less than 0.01), as was the difference between values for hydroxyprolinuria/creatininuria (p less than 0.01). Endogenous calcitonin levels rose significantly in the calcium group but remained unchanged in calcitonin-treated patients. Treatment by calcitonin and calcium was not followed by increased secretion of parathyroid hormone. The findings suggest that intranasal calcitonin can counteract early postmenopausal bone loss. [less ▲]

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