References of "Fine, Michael"
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See detailChapter 2 - Fish Sound Production: Insights
Parmentier, Eric ULg; Fine, Michael

in Suthers, Roderick; Fitch, Temcuseh; Fay, Richard (Eds.) et al Vertebrate Sound Production and Acoustic Communication (2016)

In addition to briefly reviewing sound-producing mechanisms, this chapter focuses on an under-appreciated evolutionary process, exaptation, which could aid in understanding the independent origins and ... [more ▼]

In addition to briefly reviewing sound-producing mechanisms, this chapter focuses on an under-appreciated evolutionary process, exaptation, which could aid in understanding the independent origins and high diversity of sound-producing mechanisms in fishes. Existing anatomical structures first used in non-voluntary sound production provide advantages that result in further selection and refinement of sophisticated sonic organs. Moreover, comparisons of the relationships between fish size and spectral features in multiple not phylogenetically related species highlight two acoustic patterns. In species using superfast muscles, the slope of the relationship between fish size and sound frequency is weak (1°–5°) so that emitter size is unlikely inferred from call frequency. In other species that stridulate or use bones or tendons to stimulate the swimbladder, the high slopes (25°–80°) indicate major differences in the call frequencies within a species. These signals likely convey important information (size and potential fitness of the emitter) to conspecific receivers. [less ▲]

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See detailSound Production by a Recoiling System in the Pempheridae and Terapontidae
Parmentier, Eric ULg; Fine, Michael; Mok, Hin-Kiu

in Journal of Morphology (2016)

Sound-producing mechanisms in fishes are extraordinarily diversified. We report here original mechanisms of three species from two families: the pempherid Pempheris oualensis, and the terapontids Terapon ... [more ▼]

Sound-producing mechanisms in fishes are extraordinarily diversified. We report here original mechanisms of three species from two families: the pempherid Pempheris oualensis, and the terapontids Terapon jarbua and Pelates quadrilineatus. All sonic mechanisms are built on the same structures. The rostral part of the swimbladder is connected to a pair of large sonic muscles from the head whereas the posterior part is fused with bony widenings of vertebral bodies. Two bladder regions are separated by a stretchable fenestra that allows forward extension of the anterior bladder during muscle contraction. A recoiling apparatus runs between the inner face of the anterior swimbladder and a vertebral body expansion. The elastic nature of the recoiling apparatus supports its role in helping the swimbladder to recover its initial position during sonic muscle relaxation. This system should aid fast contraction (between 100 and 250Hz) of sonic muscles. There are many differences between species in terms of the swimbladder and its attachments to the vertebral column, muscle origins, and morphology of the recoiling apparatus. The recoiling apparatus found in the phylogenetically-related families (Glaucosomatidae, Pempheridae, Terapontidae) could indicate a new character within the Percomorpharia. [less ▲]

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See detailChapter 3- Mechanisms of Fish Sound Production
Fine, Michael; Parmentier, Eric ULg

in Ladich, Friedrich (Ed.) Sound Communication in Fishes (2015)

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See detailA potential intermediate in the evolution of superfast sonic swimbladder muscles in fishes
Fine, Michael; Mok, Hin-Kiu; Tsai, Kai-En et al

Conference (2011)

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See detailConvergent evolution for sound production with a putative slow muscle in a Perciform fish Glaucosoma buergeri (Glaucosomatidae)
Fine, Michael; Mok, Hin-Kiu; Tsai, Kai-En et al

Conference (2011)

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See detailDiversity in the sound production mechanism in Ophidiiformes
Parmentier, Eric ULg; Mann, David; Kever, Loïc ULg et al

Conference (2010)

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See detailConvergent evolution for sound production with a putative slow muscle in a Perciform fish Glaucosoma buergeri (Glaucosomatidae)
Mok, Hin-Kiu; Tsai, Kai-En; Chiu, Pai-Ho et al

Conference (2010)

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See detailCall properties and morphology of the sound-producing organ in Ophidion rochei (Ophidiidae)
Parmentier, Eric ULg; Bouillac, Grégory; Dragicevic, Branko et al

in Journal of Experimental Biology (2010), 213

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See detailSeasonal variation in sonic muscles in the fawn cusk-eel Lepophidium profundorum
Nguyen, Thanh Kim; Lin, Hsung; Parmentier, Eric ULg et al

in Biology Letters (2008), 4

The fawn cusk-eel Lepophidium profundorum (Ophidiidae) has an unusual sound-producing system with sexually dimorphic sets of antagonistic muscles. Outside the mating season, the dorsal and ventral muscles ... [more ▼]

The fawn cusk-eel Lepophidium profundorum (Ophidiidae) has an unusual sound-producing system with sexually dimorphic sets of antagonistic muscles. Outside the mating season, the dorsal and ventral muscles are well developed and larger in males than in females, but the tiny intermediate muscles are smaller, suggesting a minor role, if any, in male advertisement call production. We examined summer individuals with more developed gonads and find a fourfold hypertrophy of the intermediate but not the other muscles. This result suggests androgen dependence and an important role in sound production for the intermediate muscle. Even though both sexes gain weight in the summer, the ventral and dorsal muscles in females lose weight, suggesting that sound production is less important in females and that muscle mass may be used to support egg growth. [less ▲]

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See detailSound production in two carapids (Carapus acus and C-mourlani) and through the sea cucumber tegument
Parmentier, Eric ULg; Fine, Michael; Vandewalle, Pierre ULg et al

in Acta Zoologica (2006), 87(2), 113-119

Carapus acus and Carapus mourlani are able to live inside sea cucumbers and sea stars respectively. Unlike other carapids whose sounds have been recorded (C. boraborensis, C. homei and Encheliophis ... [more ▼]

Carapus acus and Carapus mourlani are able to live inside sea cucumbers and sea stars respectively. Unlike other carapids whose sounds have been recorded (C. boraborensis, C. homei and Encheliophis gracilis), these two species have a central constriction in their swimbladder and are unlikely to encounter heterospecific carapids within their hosts. We evoked sound production in Carapus acus and Carapus mourlani by adding several individuals to a tank with a single host and found that their sounds differ substantially from the sounds emitted by other carapids in pulse length, peak frequency and sharpness of tuning (Q(3 dB)). Unlike the other carapids, C. mourlani and C. acus produce shorter and less repetitive sounds and do not produce sounds when they enter their host. Since sounds produced within a sea cucumber have the potential to be heard by distant carapids and are typically recorded outside the sea cucumber, we examined the effect of the sea cucumber tegument on acoustic transmission. Attenuation by the tegument was negligible at the frequencies within carapid sounds. Therefore, carapids have the potential to call from the relative safety of a sea cucumber without sacrificing the distance over which their transmissions are heard. [less ▲]

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See detailProduction de sons chez les Carapidae: un nouveau type de mécanisme
Parmentier, Eric ULg; Lagardère, Jean-Paul; Braquenier, Jean-Baptiste ULg et al

Conference (2006)

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See detailSound production mechanism in carapid fish: first example with a slow muscle
Parmentier, Eric ULg; Lagardère, Jean-Paul; Vandewalle, Pierre ULg et al

Conference (2006)

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