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See detailA potential intermediate in the evolution of superfast sonic swimbladder muscles in fishes
Fine, Michael; Mok, Hin-Kiu; Tsai, Kai-En et al

Conference (2011)

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See detailConvergent evolution for sound production with a putative slow muscle in a Perciform fish Glaucosoma buergeri (Glaucosomatidae)
Fine, Michael; Mok, Hin-Kiu; Tsai, Kai-En et al

Conference (2011)

Detailed reference viewed: 6 (2 ULg)
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See detailDiversity in the sound production mechanism in Ophidiiformes
Parmentier, Eric ULg; Mann, David; Kever, Loïc ULg et al

Conference (2010)

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See detailConvergent evolution for sound production with a putative slow muscle in a Perciform fish Glaucosoma buergeri (Glaucosomatidae)
Mok, Hin-Kiu; Tsai, Kai-En; Chiu, Pai-Ho et al

Conference (2010)

Detailed reference viewed: 10 (0 ULg)
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See detailCall properties and morphology of the sound-producing organ in Ophidion rochei (Ophidiidae)
Parmentier, Eric ULg; Bouillac, Grégory; Dragicevic, Branko et al

in Journal of Experimental Biology (2010), 213

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See detailSeasonal variation in sonic muscles in the fawn cusk-eel Lepophidium profundorum
Nguyen, Thanh Kim; Lin, Hsung; Parmentier, Eric ULg et al

in Biology Letters (2008), 4

The fawn cusk-eel Lepophidium profundorum (Ophidiidae) has an unusual sound-producing system with sexually dimorphic sets of antagonistic muscles. Outside the mating season, the dorsal and ventral muscles ... [more ▼]

The fawn cusk-eel Lepophidium profundorum (Ophidiidae) has an unusual sound-producing system with sexually dimorphic sets of antagonistic muscles. Outside the mating season, the dorsal and ventral muscles are well developed and larger in males than in females, but the tiny intermediate muscles are smaller, suggesting a minor role, if any, in male advertisement call production. We examined summer individuals with more developed gonads and find a fourfold hypertrophy of the intermediate but not the other muscles. This result suggests androgen dependence and an important role in sound production for the intermediate muscle. Even though both sexes gain weight in the summer, the ventral and dorsal muscles in females lose weight, suggesting that sound production is less important in females and that muscle mass may be used to support egg growth. [less ▲]

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See detailSound production in two carapids (Carapus acus and C-mourlani) and through the sea cucumber tegument
Parmentier, Eric ULg; Fine, Michael; Vandewalle, Pierre ULg et al

in Acta Zoologica (2006), 87(2), 113-119

Carapus acus and Carapus mourlani are able to live inside sea cucumbers and sea stars respectively. Unlike other carapids whose sounds have been recorded (C. boraborensis, C. homei and Encheliophis ... [more ▼]

Carapus acus and Carapus mourlani are able to live inside sea cucumbers and sea stars respectively. Unlike other carapids whose sounds have been recorded (C. boraborensis, C. homei and Encheliophis gracilis), these two species have a central constriction in their swimbladder and are unlikely to encounter heterospecific carapids within their hosts. We evoked sound production in Carapus acus and Carapus mourlani by adding several individuals to a tank with a single host and found that their sounds differ substantially from the sounds emitted by other carapids in pulse length, peak frequency and sharpness of tuning (Q(3 dB)). Unlike the other carapids, C. mourlani and C. acus produce shorter and less repetitive sounds and do not produce sounds when they enter their host. Since sounds produced within a sea cucumber have the potential to be heard by distant carapids and are typically recorded outside the sea cucumber, we examined the effect of the sea cucumber tegument on acoustic transmission. Attenuation by the tegument was negligible at the frequencies within carapid sounds. Therefore, carapids have the potential to call from the relative safety of a sea cucumber without sacrificing the distance over which their transmissions are heard. [less ▲]

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See detailSound production mechanism in carapid fish: first example with a slow muscle
Parmentier, Eric ULg; Lagardère, Jean-Paul; Vandewalle, Pierre ULg et al

Conference (2006)

Detailed reference viewed: 6 (0 ULg)
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See detailProduction de sons chez les Carapidae: un nouveau type de mécanisme
Parmentier, Eric ULg; Lagardère, Jean-Paul; Braquenier, Jean-Baptiste ULg et al

Conference (2006)

Detailed reference viewed: 2 (0 ULg)