References of "Finazzi, Giovanni"
     in
Bookmark and Share    
Full Text
Peer Reviewed
See detailThe onset of NPQ and Deltamu(H)+ upon illumination of tobacco plants studied through the influence of mitochondrial electron transport.
Cardol, Pierre ULg; De Paepe, Rosine; Franck, Fabrice ULg et al

in Biochimica et Biophysica Acta (2010), 1797(2), 177-88

The relationship between the development of photoprotective mechanisms (non-photochemical quenching, NPQ), the generation of the electrochemical proton gradient in the chloroplast and the capacity to ... [more ▼]

The relationship between the development of photoprotective mechanisms (non-photochemical quenching, NPQ), the generation of the electrochemical proton gradient in the chloroplast and the capacity to assimilate CO(2) was studied in tobacco dark-adapted leaves at the onset of illumination with low light. These conditions induce the generation of a transient NPQ, which relaxes in the light in parallel with the activation of the Calvin cycle. Wild-type plants were compared with a CMSII mitochondrial mutant, which lacks the respiratory complex I and shows a delayed activation of photosynthesis. In the mutant, a slower onset of photosynthesis was mirrored by a decreased capacity to develop NPQ. This correlates with a reduced efficiency to reroute electrons at the PSI reducing side towards cyclic electron flow around PSI and/or other alternative acceptor pools, and with a smaller ability to generate a proton motive force in the light. Altogether, these data illustrate the tight relationship existing between the capacity to evacuate excess electrons accumulated in the intersystem carriers and the capacity to dissipate excess photons during a dark to light transition. These data also underline the essential role of respiration in modulating the photoprotective response in dark-adapted leaves, by poising the cellular redox state. [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 29 (11 ULg)
Full Text
Peer Reviewed
See detailAn atypical member of the light-harvesting complex stress-related protein family modulates diatom responses to light.
Bailleul, Benjamin; Rogato, Alessandra; de Martino, Alessandra et al

in Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America (2010), 107(42), 18214-9

Diatoms are prominent phytoplanktonic organisms that contribute around 40% of carbon assimilation in the oceans. They grow and perform optimally in variable environments, being able to cope with ... [more ▼]

Diatoms are prominent phytoplanktonic organisms that contribute around 40% of carbon assimilation in the oceans. They grow and perform optimally in variable environments, being able to cope with unpredictable changes in the amount and quality of light. The molecular mechanisms regulating diatom light responses are, however, still obscure. Using knockdown Phaeodactylum tricornutum transgenic lines, we reveal the key function of a member of the light-harvesting complex stress-related (LHCSR) protein family, denoted LHCX1, in modulation of excess light energy dissipation. In contrast to green algae, this gene is already maximally expressed in nonstressful light conditions and encodes a protein required for efficient light responses and growth. LHCX1 also influences natural variability in photoresponse, as evidenced in ecotypes isolated from different latitudes that display different LHCX1 protein levels. We conclude, therefore, that this gene plays a pivotal role in managing light responses in diatoms. [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 27 (3 ULg)
Full Text
Peer Reviewed
See detailElectrochromism: a useful probe to study algal photosynthesis.
Bailleul, Benjamin; Cardol, Pierre ULg; Breyton, Cecile et al

in Photosynthesis Research (2010), 106(1-2), 179-89

In photosynthesis, electron transfer along the photosynthetic chain results in a vectorial transfer of protons from the stroma to the lumenal space of the thylakoids. This promotes the generation of an ... [more ▼]

In photosynthesis, electron transfer along the photosynthetic chain results in a vectorial transfer of protons from the stroma to the lumenal space of the thylakoids. This promotes the generation of an electrochemical proton gradient (Deltamu(H)(+)), which comprises a gradient of electric potential (DeltaPsi) and of proton concentration (DeltapH). The Deltamu(H)(+) has a central role in the photosynthetic process, providing the energy source for ATP synthesis. It is also involved in many regulatory mechanisms. The DeltapH modulates the rate of electron transfer and triggers deexcitation of excess energy within the light harvesting complexes. The DeltaPsi is required for metabolite and protein transport across the membranes. Its presence also induces a shift in the absorption spectra of some photosynthetic pigments, resulting in the so-called ElectroChromic Shift (ECS). In this review, we discuss the characteristic features of the ECS, and illustrate possible applications for the study of photosynthetic processes in vivo. [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 34 (4 ULg)
Full Text
Peer Reviewed
See detailImpaired respiration discloses the physiological significance of state transitions in Chlamydomonas.
Cardol, Pierre ULg; Alric, Jean; Girard-Bascou, Jacqueline et al

in Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America (2009), 106(37), 15979-84

State transitions correspond to a major regulation process for photosynthesis, whereby chlorophyll protein complexes responsible for light harvesting migrate between photosystem II and photosystem I in ... [more ▼]

State transitions correspond to a major regulation process for photosynthesis, whereby chlorophyll protein complexes responsible for light harvesting migrate between photosystem II and photosystem I in response to changes in the redox poise of the intersystem electron carriers. Here we disclose their physiological significance in Chlamydomonas reinhardtii using a genetic approach. Using single and double mutants defective for state transitions and/or mitochondrial respiration, we show that photosynthetic growth, and therefore biomass production, critically depends on state transitions in respiratory-defective conditions. When extra ATP cannot be provided by respiration, enhanced photosystem I turnover elicited by transition to state 2 is required for photosynthetic activity. Concomitant impairment of state transitions and respiration decreases the overall yield of photosynthesis, ultimately leading to reduced fitness. We thus provide experimental evidence that the combined energetic contributions of state transitions and respiration are required for efficient carbon assimilation in this alga. [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 34 (10 ULg)
Full Text
Peer Reviewed
See detailAlternative photosynthetic electron flow to oxygen in marine Synechococcus.
Bailey, Shaun; Melis, Anastasios; Mackey, Katherine R M et al

in Biochimica et Biophysica Acta (2008), 1777(3), 269-76

Cyanobacteria dominate the world's oceans where iron is often barely detectable. One manifestation of low iron adaptation in the oligotrophic marine environment is a decrease in levels of iron-rich ... [more ▼]

Cyanobacteria dominate the world's oceans where iron is often barely detectable. One manifestation of low iron adaptation in the oligotrophic marine environment is a decrease in levels of iron-rich photosynthetic components, including the reaction center of photosystem I and the cytochrome b6f complex [R.F. Strzepek and P.J. Harrison, Photosynthetic architecture differs in coastal and oceanic diatoms, Nature 431 (2004) 689-692.]. These thylakoid membrane components have well characterised roles in linear and cyclic photosynthetic electron transport and their low abundance creates potential impediments to photosynthetic function. Here we show that the marine cyanobacterium Synechococcus WH8102 exhibits significant alternative electron flow to O2, a potential adaptation to the low iron environment in oligotrophic oceans. This alternative electron flow appears to extract electrons from the intersystem electron transport chain, prior to photosystem I. Inhibitor studies demonstrate that a propyl gallate-sensitive oxidase mediates this flow of electrons to oxygen, which in turn alleviates excessive photosystem II excitation pressure that can often occur even at relatively low irradiance. These findings are also discussed in the context of satisfying the energetic requirements of the cell when photosystem I abundance is low. [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 11 (0 ULg)
Full Text
Peer Reviewed
See detailAn original adaptation of photosynthesis in the marine green alga Ostreococcus.
Cardol, Pierre ULg; Bailleul, Benjamin; Rappaport, Fabrice et al

in Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America (2008), 105(22), 7881-6

Adaptation of photosynthesis in marine environment has been examined in two strains of the green, picoeukaryote Ostreococcus: OTH95, a surface/high-light strain, and RCC809, a deep-sea/low-light strain ... [more ▼]

Adaptation of photosynthesis in marine environment has been examined in two strains of the green, picoeukaryote Ostreococcus: OTH95, a surface/high-light strain, and RCC809, a deep-sea/low-light strain. Differences between the two strains include changes in the light-harvesting capacity, which is lower in OTH95, and in the photoprotection capacity, which is enhanced in OTH95. Furthermore, RCC809 has a reduced maximum rate of O(2) evolution, which is limited by its decreased photosystem I (PSI) level, a possible adaptation to Fe limitation in the open oceans. This decrease is, however, accompanied by a substantial rerouting of the electron flow to establish an H(2)O-to-H(2)O cycle, involving PSII and a potential plastid plastoquinol terminal oxidase. This pathway bypasses electron transfer through the cytochrome b(6)f complex and allows the pumping of "extra" protons into the thylakoid lumen. By promoting the generation of a large DeltapH, it facilitates ATP synthesis and nonphotochemical quenching when RCC809 cells are exposed to excess excitation energy. We propose that the diversion of electrons to oxygen downstream of PSII, but before PSI, reflects a common and compulsory strategy in marine phytoplankton to bypass the constraints imposed by light and/or nutrient limitation and allow successful colonization of the open-ocean marine environment. [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 46 (4 ULg)