References of "Evans, J Scott"
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See detailMartian upper atmosphere response to solar EUV flux and soft X-ray flares
Jain, Sonal; Stewart, Ian; Schneider, Nicholas M. et al

in AAS/Division for Planetary Sciences Meeting Abstracts (2016, October 01)

Planetary upper atmosphere energetics is mainly governed by absorption of solar extreme ultraviolet (EUV) radiation. Understanding the response of planetary upper atmosphere to the daily, long and short ... [more ▼]

Planetary upper atmosphere energetics is mainly governed by absorption of solar extreme ultraviolet (EUV) radiation. Understanding the response of planetary upper atmosphere to the daily, long and short term variation in solar flux is very important to quantify energy budget of upper atmosphere. We report a comprehensive study of Mars dayglow observations made by the IUVS instrument aboard the MAVEN spacecraft, focusing on upper atmospheric response to solar EUV flux. Our analysis shows both short and long term effect of solar EUV flux on Martian thermospheric temperature. We find a significant drop (> 100 K) in thermospheric temperature between Ls = 218° and Ls = 140°, attributed primarily to the decrease in solar activity and increase in heliocentric distance. IUVS has observed response of Martian thermosphere to the 27-day solar flux variation due to solar rotation.We also report effect of two solar flare events (19 Oct. 2014 and 24 March 2015) on Martian dayglow observations. IUVS observed about ~25% increase in observed brightness of major ultraviolet dayglow emissions below 120 km, where most of the high energy photons (< 10 nm) deposit their energy. The results presented in this talk will help us better understand the role of EUV flux in total heat budget of Martian thermosphere. [less ▲]

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See detailStructure and variability of the Martian upper atmosphere: Ultraviolet dayglow observations by MAVEN/IUVS
Deighan, Justin; Jain, Sonal K.; Lo, Daniel Y. et al

in AAS/Division for Planetary Sciences Meeting Abstracts (2015, November 01)

Mars has been studied extensively at ultraviolet wavelengths starting from Mariner 6 and 7, Mariner 9, and more recently by SPICAM aboard Mars Express. The results from these measurements reveal a large ... [more ▼]

Mars has been studied extensively at ultraviolet wavelengths starting from Mariner 6 and 7, Mariner 9, and more recently by SPICAM aboard Mars Express. The results from these measurements reveal a large variability in the composition and structure of the Martian upper atmosphere. However, due to the lack of simultaneous measurements of energy input (such as solar electromagnetic and particle flux), and limitations in the observation geometry and data itself, this variability is still not fully understood.We report a comprehensive study of Mars dayglow observations by the Imaging Ultraviolet Spectrograph (IUVS) aboard the Mars Atmosphere and Volatile EvolutioN (MAVEN) satellite, focusing on vertical and global upper atmospheric structure and seasonal variability. The dayglow emission spectra show features similar to previous UV measurements at Mars. IUVS has detected a second, low-altitude peak in the emission profile of OI 297.2 nm, confirming the prediction that the absorption of solar Lyman alpha emission is an important energy source there. We find a significant drop in thermospheric scale height and temperature between Ls = 218° and Ls = 337 - 352°, attributed primarily to the decrease in solar activity and increase in heliocentric distance. The CO[SUB]2[/SUB][SUP]+[/SUP] UVD peak intensity is well correlated with simultaneous observations of solar 17 - 22 nm irradiance at Mars by Extreme Ultraviolet Monitor (EUVM) aboard MAVEN. Variations of the derived CO[SUB]2[/SUB] density also exhibit significant persistent global structure with longitudinal wavenumbers 1, 2 and 3 in a fixed local solar time frame, pointing to non-migrating atmospheric tides driven by diurnal solar heating. We will present and discuss the variability in Martian UV dayglow, its dependence on solar EUV flux, and the importance of IUVS observations in our current understanding of Mars’ thermosphere. [less ▲]

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See detailThe production of Titan's ultraviolet nitrogen airglow
Stevens, Michael H; Gustin, Jacques ULg; Ajello, Joseph M et al

in Journal of Geophysical Research. Space Physics (2011), 116

The Cassini Ultraviolet Imaging Spectrograph (UVIS) observed Titan's dayside limb in the extreme ultraviolet (EUV) and far ultraviolet (FUV) on 22 June 2009 from a mean distance of 23 Titan radii. These ... [more ▼]

The Cassini Ultraviolet Imaging Spectrograph (UVIS) observed Titan's dayside limb in the extreme ultraviolet (EUV) and far ultraviolet (FUV) on 22 June 2009 from a mean distance of 23 Titan radii. These high-quality observations reveal the same EUV and FUV emissions arising from photoelectron excitation and photofragmentation of molecular nitrogen (N[SUB]2[/SUB]) as found on Earth. We investigate both of these solar driven processes with a terrestrial airglow model adapted to Titan and find that total predicted radiances for the two brightest N[SUB]2[/SUB] band systems agree with the observed peak radiances to within 5%. Using N[SUB]2[/SUB] densities constrained from in situ observations by the Ion Neutral Mass Spectrometer on Cassini, the altitude of the observed limb peak of the EUV and FUV emission bands is between 840 and 1060 km and generally consistent with model predictions. We find no evidence for carbon emissions in Titan's FUV airglow in contrast to previous Titan airglow studies using UVIS data. In their place, we identify several vibrational bands from the N[SUB]2[/SUB] Vegard-Kaplan system arising from photoelectron impact with predicted peak radiances in agreement with observations. These Titan UV airglow observations are therefore comprised of emissions arising only from solar processes on N[SUB]2[/SUB] with no detectable magnetospheric contribution. Weaker EUV Carroll-Yoshino N[SUB]2[/SUB] bands within the v′ = 3, 4, and 6 progressions between 870 and 1020 Å are underpredicted by about a factor of five while the (0,1) band near 980 Å is overpredicted by about a factor of three. [less ▲]

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