References of "Elsner, R"
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See detailThe Solar Wind Upstream of Saturn: Cassini Plasma measurements and Saturn's Aurora
Crary, F. J.; Young, D. T.; Barraclough, B. et al

Conference (2004, May 17)

For a full solar rotation in January and early February, 2004, the Cassini spacecraft and Hubble and Chandra Space Telescopes were used to make simultaneous observations of the solar wind and Saturn's ... [more ▼]

For a full solar rotation in January and early February, 2004, the Cassini spacecraft and Hubble and Chandra Space Telescopes were used to make simultaneous observations of the solar wind and Saturn's aurora. We report here on initial results from data taken with the Cassini Plasma Spectrometer's electron and high-resolution ion sensors in the solar wind upstream of Saturn. These measurements, combined with those of other particles and fields instruments on Cassini show two shock and corotating interaction regions, which reached Saturn approximately twelve hours later. An auroral response to each of these events was observed by the Hubble Space Telescope. [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 63 (4 ULg)
See detailAuroral and Non-auroral X-ray Emissions from Jupiter: A Comparative View
Bhardwaj, A.; Elsner, R.; Gladstone, R. et al

Poster (2004)

Jovian X-rays can be broadly classified into two categories: (1) "auroral" emission, which is confined to high-latitudes ( ˜>60° ) at both polar regions, and (2) "dayglow" emission, which originates from ... [more ▼]

Jovian X-rays can be broadly classified into two categories: (1) "auroral" emission, which is confined to high-latitudes ( ˜>60° ) at both polar regions, and (2) "dayglow" emission, which originates from the sunlit low-latitude ( ˜<50° ) regions of the disk (hereafter called "disk" emissions). Recent X-ray observations of Jupiter by Chandra and XMM-Newton have shown that these two types of X-ray emission from Jupiter have different morphological, temporal, and spectral characteristics. In particular: 1) contrary to the auroral X-rays, which are concentrated in a spot in the north and in a band that runs half-way across the planet in the south, the low-latitude X-ray disk is almost uniform; 2) unlike the ˜40±20-min periodic oscillations seen in the auroral X-ray emissions, the disk emissions do not show any periodic oscillations; 3) the disk emission is harder and extends to higher energies than the auroral spectrum; and 4) the disk X-ray emission show time variability similar to that seen in solar X-rays. These differences and features imply that the processes producing X-rays are different at these two latitude regions on Jupiter. We will present the details of these and other features that suggest the differences between these two classes of X-ray emissions from Jupiter, and discuss the current scenario of the production mechanism of them. [less ▲]

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See detailX-Ray Emissions from Jupiter
Gladstone, G.; Waite, J.; Grodent, Denis ULg et al

Conference (2001, May 29)

X-ray emissions from Jupiter have been observed for over 20~years. Jovian x-ray emissions are associated with the high-latitude aurora and with solar fluorescence and/or an energetic particle source at ... [more ▼]

X-ray emissions from Jupiter have been observed for over 20~years. Jovian x-ray emissions are associated with the high-latitude aurora and with solar fluorescence and/or an energetic particle source at low-latitudes as identified by past Einstein and ROSAT observations. Enhanced auroral x-rays were also observed to be associated with the impact of Comet Shoemaker-Levy~9. The high-latitude x-ray emissions are best explained by energetic sulfur and oxygen ion precipitation from the Jovian magnetosphere, a suggestion that has been confirmed by recent Chandra ACIS observations. Exciting new information about Jovian x-ray emissions has been made possible with Chandra's High Resolution Camera. We report here for the first time the detection of a forty minute oscillation associated with the Jovian x-ray aurora. With the help of ultraviolet auroral observations from Hubble Space Telescope, we pinpoint the auroral mapping of the x-rays and provide new information on the x-ray source mechanism. [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 4 (0 ULg)