References of "Druart, Philippe"
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See detailPhenotyping of Brassica napus L. plantlets affected during in vitro growth by the presence of epoxiconazole.
Durenne, Bastien ULg; Blondel, Alodie; Ducat, Nathalie et al

in 7th International Symposium on Brassicas Abstract Book (2017, May 24)

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See detailThe Effect of Nutrients on the Degradation of Hydrocarbons in Mangrove Ecosystems by Microorganisms
Semboung Lang, Firmin ULg; Tarayre, Cédric ULg; Destain, Jacqueline ULg et al

in International Journal of Environmental Research (2016), 10(4), 583-592

Mangrove ecosystems are areas prone to various types of pollution, especially hydrocarbons. These hydrocarbons mostly stem from human activities such as spills coming from offshore oil operations, runoff ... [more ▼]

Mangrove ecosystems are areas prone to various types of pollution, especially hydrocarbons. These hydrocarbons mostly stem from human activities such as spills coming from offshore oil operations, runoff from surrounding urban areas or atmospheric deposition. This pollution causes the decline of mangroves, which results in an imbalance in the functioning of this particular ecosystem with damages to the microbiota. Biodegradation allows to restore these ecosystems. This biodegradation can only be effective in specific environmental conditions. The presence of nutrients, which stimulate bacterial growth and promote biodegradation, is a key parameter to be considered. During this experiment, we achieved biodegradation tests to assess the effect of nitrogen and phosphorus on the process. The results showed that the biodegradation rates were strongly bound to the presence of nutrients. The degradation rates depended on the medium. The treatment that reached the best rate of degradation of diesel after 10 days was the one using 20% of a nutrient solution (MSM) containing nitrogen and phosphorus. This treatment led to a maximal degradation of 84.7% ± 4.7% obtained in the flasks containing 20% of a nutrient solution (MSM) containing nitrogen and phosphorus. [less ▲]

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See detailBiodegradation of Polycyclic Aromatic Hydrocarbons in Mangrove Sediments Under Different Strategies: Natural Attenuation, Biostimulation, and Bioaugmentation with Rhodococcus erythropolis T902.1
Semboung Lang, Firmin ULg; Destain, Jacqueline ULg; Delvigne, Frank ULg et al

in Water, Air & Soil Pollution (2016)

Polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) are pollutants that occur in mangrove sediments. Their removal by bacteria often depends on specific characteristics as the number of benzene rings they possess and ... [more ▼]

Polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) are pollutants that occur in mangrove sediments. Their removal by bacteria often depends on specific characteristics as the number of benzene rings they possess and their solubility. Their removal also depends on environmental factors, such as pH, temperature, oxygen, and the ability of the endogenous or exogenous microflora to metabolize hydrocarbons.With the aim of treating mangrove sediments polluted by hydrocarbons in a biological way, a biodegradation experiment was conducted using mangrove sediments artificially contaminated with a mixture of four PAHs. The study used Rhodococcus erythropolis as an exogenous bacterial strain in order to assess the biodegradation of the PAH mixture by natural attenuation, biostimulation, bioaugmentation, and a combination of biostimulation and bioaugmentation. The results showed that the last three treatments were more efficient than natural attenuation. The biostimulation/bioaugmentation combination proved to be the most effective PAH degradation treatment. [less ▲]

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See detailLeachate and leonardite Humic substances effect on in vitro root initiation and elongation of woody species
Tahiri, Abdelghani ULg; Destain, Jacqueline ULg; Thonart, Philippe ULg et al

Poster (2016, February 05)

Arise from the chemical and biological degradation of plant and animal residues and from the synthetic activities of microorganisms in the soil, humic substances (HS) are natural heterogeneous aromatic ... [more ▼]

Arise from the chemical and biological degradation of plant and animal residues and from the synthetic activities of microorganisms in the soil, humic substances (HS) are natural heterogeneous aromatic and organic compounds. These substances are chemically complex with no clearly defined chemical structure, although generalized models have been proposed. Present everywhere in the nature; they take part in basic functionalities in any ecosystems involving soils, sediments, water and landfills. They have long been recognized as plant growth promoting substances, particularly with regard to influencing nutrient uptake, root growth and architecture. They influence plant productivity directly by the stimulation of biochemical and metabolic processes or indirectly through the modification of soil characteristics and microflora activities. All together, these properties mainly affect root architecture by inducing root hairs proliferation, differentiating root cells and enhancing lateral root emergence. Experiments targeting the rooting stages in absence of interferences were conducted in vitro using HS extracted from landfill leachate and a stable commercial formulation (“Humifirst” from TRADECORP company: 12% humic acid and fulvic acid 3%) issued from leonardite. Shoots and leaves explants of silver birch (Betula pendula Roth) and black alder (Alnus glutinosa L. Gaertn) explants were treated with 10 ppm of leachate and leonardite HS for 5 days during the rooting induction/initiation phase or during rooting elongation phase. The results obtained show that treatment with a low concentration (10 ppm) during induction/initiation phase may be slightly unfavorable to the formation of roots in alder but not in birch. While, in root elongation phase, there is an increase in the number of roots per shoot only in birch. The direct effects of leachate and leonardite HS on root development vary from one species to another. [less ▲]

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See detailComparison of explant responses treated with leachate and leonardite sources of humic substances during in vitro rooting of woody plants.
Tahiri, Abdelghani ULg; Destain, Jacqueline ULg; Thonart, Philippe ULg et al

in Communications in Agricultural and Applied Biological Sciences (2016), 81(1), 158-165

As heterogeneous mixtures of compounds resulting from the physical, chemical and microbiological transformations of organic residues, humic substances (HS) are mostly recognized for their biostimulation ... [more ▼]

As heterogeneous mixtures of compounds resulting from the physical, chemical and microbiological transformations of organic residues, humic substances (HS) are mostly recognized for their biostimulation of plant growth that firstly involve the root development and architecture before further putative improvement of nutrients uptakes. To avoid the interferences currently reported from external origins, the successive steps of rooting have been carried out using shoots and isolated leaves of birch and alder vitro-plants. Extracts issued from landfill leachate (LHS) has been compared to a stable formulation from leonardite ("Humifirst" 12% humic acid 3% and fulvic acid) commercialized by TRADECORP company's (HHS). Chemical analysis showed that LHS source typically contain much higher N (mainly as ammonium (93%) and chloride concentration than HHS. Used at low concentration (10 ppm) during root induction/initiation phase, both HS sources may be slightly unfavorable to the root formation (21% of reduction in primary root number) of alder but not of birch. While, in root elongation phase, there is an increase in the primary root length and lateral root number. The direct effects of HS on in vitro root development vary from one species to another depending on the root treatment stage. Results showed that both explants type response are equivalent in the development of a complete rooting system. [less ▲]

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See detailCharacterization and Evaluation of the Potential of a Diesel-Degrading Bacterial Consortium Isolated from Fresh Mangrove Sediment
Semboung Lang, Firmin ULg; Destain, Jacqueline ULg; Delvigne, Frank ULg et al

in Water, Air & Soil Pollution (2016)

Hydrocarbons are ubiquitous and persistent organic pollutants in the environment. In wetlands and marine environments, particularly in mangrove ecosystems, their increase and significant accumulation ... [more ▼]

Hydrocarbons are ubiquitous and persistent organic pollutants in the environment. In wetlands and marine environments, particularly in mangrove ecosystems, their increase and significant accumulation result from human activities such as oil and gas exploration and exploitation operations. Remediation of these ecosystems requires the development of adequate and effective strategies. Natural attenuation, biostimulation, and bioaugmentation are all biological soil treatment techniques that can be adapted to mangroves. Our experiments were performed on samples of fresh mangrove sediments from the Cameroon estuary and mainly from the Wouri River in Cameroon. This study aims to assess the degradation potential of a bacterial consortium isolated from mangrove sediment. The principle of our bioremediation experiments is based on a series of tests designed to evaluate the potential of an active indigenous microflora and three exogenous pure strains, to degrade diesel with/without adding nutrients. The experiments were conducted in laboratory flasks and a greenhouse in microcosms. In one case, as in the other, the endogenous microflora showed that it was able to degrade diesel. Under stress of the pollutant, the endogenous microflora fits well enough in the middle to enable metabolism of the pollutant. However, the Rhodococcus strain was more effective over time. The degradation rate was 77 and 90%in the vials containing the sterile sediments and non-sterile sediments, respectively. The results are comparable with those obtained in the microcosms in a greenhouse where only the endogenous microflora were used. The results of this study show that mangrove sediment contains an active microflora that can metabolize diesel. Indigenous and active microflora show an interesting potential for diesel degradation. [less ▲]

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See detailComprehensive comparison of the chemical and structural characterization of landfill leachate and leonardite humic fractions
Tahiri, Abdelghani ULg; Richel, Aurore ULg; Destain, Jacqueline ULg et al

in Analytical and Bioanalytical Chemistry (2016), 408(7), 1917-1928

Humic substances (HS) are complex and heterogeneous mixtures of organic compounds that occur everywhere in the environment. They represent most of the dissolved organic matter in soils, sediments (fossil ... [more ▼]

Humic substances (HS) are complex and heterogeneous mixtures of organic compounds that occur everywhere in the environment. They represent most of the dissolved organic matter in soils, sediments (fossil), water, and landfills. The exact structure of HS macromolecules has not yet been determined because of their complexity and heterogeneity. Various descriptions of HS are used depending on specific environments of origin and research interests. In order to improve the understanding of the structure of HS extracted from landfill leachate (LHS) and commercial HS from leonardite (HHS), this study sought to compare the composition and characterization of the structure of LHS and HHS using elemental composition, chromatographic (high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC)), and spectroscopic techniques (UV–vis, FTIR, NMR, and MALDI-TOF). The results showed that LHS molecules have a lower molecular weight and less aromatic structure than HHS molecules. The characteristics of functional groups of both LHS and HHS, however, were basically similar, but there was some differences in absorbance intensity. There were also less aliphatic and acidic functional groups and more aromatic and polyphenolic compounds in the humic acid (HA) fraction than in the fulvic acid (FA) and other molecules (OM) fractions of both origins. The differences between LHS and HHS might be due to the time course of humification. Combining the results obtained from these analytical techniques cold improve our understanding of the structure of HS of different origins and thus enhance their potential use. [less ▲]

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See detailUSING TDU-GC-MS TO INVESTIGATE THE VOCS EMISSION OF BRASSICA NAPUS L. PLANTLETS CULTIVATED IN VITRO AND EXPOSED TO CADMIUM ABIOTIC STRESS.
Durenne, Bastien ULg; Blondel, Alodie; Druart, Philippe et al

in 40th ISCC and 13th GCxGC Symposium Abstracts book (2016)

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See detailCharacterization and Evaluation of the Potential of a Diesel-Degrading Bacterial Consortium Isolated from Fresh Mangrove Sediment
Lang, Firmin Semboung; Destain, Jacqueline ULg; Delvigne, Frank ULg et al

in Water, Air & Soil Pollution (2016), 227(2), 1-20

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See detailChange in ATP-binding cassette B1/19, glutamine synthetase and alcohol dehydrogenase gene expression during root elongation in Betula pendula Roth and Alnus glutinosa L. Gaertn in response to leachate and leonardite humic substances
Tahiri, Abdelghani ULg; Delporte, Fabienne ULg; Muhovski, Yordan et al

in Plant Physiology & Biochemistry (2015), 98

Humic substances (HS) are complex and heterogeneous compounds of humified organic matter resulting from the chemical and microbiological decomposition of organic residues. HS have a positive effect on ... [more ▼]

Humic substances (HS) are complex and heterogeneous compounds of humified organic matter resulting from the chemical and microbiological decomposition of organic residues. HS have a positive effect on plant growth and development by improving soil structure and fertility. They have long been recognized as plant growth-promoting substances, particularly with regard to influencing nutrient uptake, root growth and architecture. The biochemical and molecular mechanisms through which HS influence plant physiology are not well understood. This study evaluated the bioactivity of landfill leachate and leonardite HS on alder (Alnus glutinosa L. Gaertn) and birch (Betula pendula Roth) during root elongation in vitro. Changes in root development were studied in relation to auxin, carbon and nitrogen metabolisms, as well as to the stress adaptive response. The cDNA fragments of putative genes encoding two ATP-binding cassette (ABC) transporters (ABCB1 and ABCB19) belonging to the B subfamily of plant ABC auxin transporters were cloned and sequenced. Molecular data indicate that HS and their humic acid (HA) fractions induce root growth by influencing polar auxin transport (PAT), as illustrated by the modulation of the ABCB transporter transcript levels (ABCB1 and ABCB19). There were also changes in alcohol dehydrogenase (ADH) and glutamine synthetase (GS) gene transcript levels in response to HS exposure. These findings confirmed that humic matter affects plant growth and development through various metabolic pathways, including hormonal, carbon and nitrogen metabolisms and stress response or signalization. [less ▲]

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See detailIn vitro model to study the biological properties of humic fractions from landfill leachate and leonardite during root elongation of Alnus glutinosa L. Gaertn and Betula pendula Roth.
Tahiri, Abdelghani ULg; Destain, Jacqueline ULg; Thonart, Philippe ULg et al

in Plant Cell, Tissue & Organ Culture (2015), 122(3), 739-749

Humic substances (HS) are organic compounds resulting from the physical, chemical and microbiological transformations of organic residues. Our study aims to determine the main biological properties of HS ... [more ▼]

Humic substances (HS) are organic compounds resulting from the physical, chemical and microbiological transformations of organic residues. Our study aims to determine the main biological properties of HS comparing landfill leachate (LHS) source to a stable formulation extracted from leonardite (HHS), and using an in vitro system of root development from shoot and leaf explants of silver birch (Betula pendula Roth) and black alder (Alnus glutinosa L. Gaertn). Results showed that both explants of both species rooted closely to 100% when cultivated in absence of HS. The incorporation of HS or their fractions into the culture medium affect root growth, mainly lateral roots formation and primary root length. Applied at low concentration (10 ppm) HS stimulated especially primary root growth. But at high concentration (100 ppm), LHS inhibited root formation of alder, while birch was more tolerant. The application of 100 ppm of HHS, did not affect alder root growth but increased root growth in birch. Humic acids fractions (HA) were favorable and improved root growth while, fulvic acids (FA) and other molecules (OM) decreased significantly root growth, especially those extracted LHS. The root inhibition expressed at high LHS concentration may be due to the presence of different toxic molecules and root growth inhibitors in OM and FA fractions and that some of them remained in the OM fraction from leonardite. [less ▲]

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See detailRecherches de lignées aromatiques d’Abies par hybridation somatique
Fauconnier, Marie-Laure ULg; Druart, Philippe

Report (2015)

L’objectif du projet de recherche est d’associer les caractéristiques de croissance d’A. nordmanniana aux propriétés aromatiques d’autres espèces d’Abies en suivant la voie de la fusion somatique. Les ... [more ▼]

L’objectif du projet de recherche est d’associer les caractéristiques de croissance d’A. nordmanniana aux propriétés aromatiques d’autres espèces d’Abies en suivant la voie de la fusion somatique. Les travaux de recherche en culture "in vitro" sont menés au laboratoire de l’Unité de Génie biologique du Département "Science du Vivant" du CRAW (section 1) tandis que les analyses relatives à la détermination des profils aromatiques sont réalisées dans le laboratoire de l'Unité chimie générale et organique de l'Université de Liège-Gembloux Agro- Bio-Tech (section 2). Les deux Unités de recherche ont poursuivi leurs activités en parfaite collaboration. La première a tenté de restituer ou garder les propriétés embryogènes au travers de protoplastes provenant de lignées embryogènes d’A. nordmanniana, d’induire l’embryogenèse somatique sur des tissus d’embryons zygotiques d’autres Abies aromatiques et de réaliser des fusions somatiques en associant des protoplastes à des cellules de têtes d’embryons. La seconde s’occupait de caractériser les composés aromatiques, de suivre leur évolution selon période de végétation, de distinguer les espèces entre elles selon le profil aromatique de leurs graines tandis qu’en parallèle, elle mettait au point les techniques d’analyses en conditions aseptiques sur des lignées embryogènes d’A. nordmanniana d’origines génétiques différentes et sur les masses issues de fusions potentielles intra ou interspécifiques avec A. balsamea. [less ▲]

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See detailValorisation et propriétés des substances humiques des lixiviats de décharge
Tahiri, Abdelghani ULg; Destain, Jacqueline ULg; Thonart, Philippe ULg et al

in Journal of Materials and Environmental Science (2014), 5 (S2)

Experiments were conducted in the laboratory with humic substances (HS) extracted from Landfill leachate and stable HS formulation called "Humifirst" (12% humic acid 3% and fulvic acid) from TRADECORP ... [more ▼]

Experiments were conducted in the laboratory with humic substances (HS) extracted from Landfill leachate and stable HS formulation called "Humifirst" (12% humic acid 3% and fulvic acid) from TRADECORP company's (Spain), in order to study their effects on root system development of birch and alder vitroplants in absence of interferences. The results obtained show that treatment with a low concentration (10 ppm) during induction/initiation phase may be slightly unfavorable to the formation of roots in alder but not in birch. While, in root elongation phase, there is an increase in the number of roots per shoot only in birch. Applied at 100 ppm during elongation phase, leachate HS inhibit completely rooting in alder and reduce lateral root density in birch. Under these conditions, the birch shoots grow yet more. These observations differ from those of Humifirst, which has no significant effect and no inhibition. The direct effects of leachate HS on root development and shoot growth vary from one species to another depending on the concentration. [less ▲]

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See detailPropriétés physico-chimiques et biologiques des substances humiques en relation avec le développement végétal
Tahiri, Abdelghani ULg; Destain, Jacqueline ULg; Druart, Philippe et al

in Biotechnologie, Agronomie, Société et Environnement = Biotechnology, Agronomy, Society and Environment [=BASE] (2014), 18(3), 436-445

Les substances humiques (SH) sont des composés organiques résultant de la transformation physique, chimique et microbiologique des résidus végétaux et animaux. Elles se retrouvent sous forme de ... [more ▼]

Les substances humiques (SH) sont des composés organiques résultant de la transformation physique, chimique et microbiologique des résidus végétaux et animaux. Elles se retrouvent sous forme de macromolécules carbonées hétérogènes et complexes dans tous les écosystèmes au niveau des sols ainsi que des sédiments, des eaux de surface et des lixiviats de décharges. Elles sont issues de processus d’humification déférents, générant ainsi des molécules variables et complexes composées principalement de carbone, d’hydrogène, d’oxygène, d’azote, de soufre et de groupements fonctionnels (COOH, OH, C=O). Ces substances sont connues pour influencer les propriétés du sol et interagir avec la croissance et le développement des plantes ou avec l’activité des microorganismes. L’influence de la croissance des plantes s’exprime généralement de manière directe via la stimulation des processus biochimiques et métaboliques ou indirecte via l’amélioration de la nutrition minérale. Mais, l’intensité de réponse reste dépendante de différents paramètres tels que l’origine, la nature de la matière organique initiale, les processus de transformation et la concentration des SH ainsi que des conditions expérimentales et des plantes traitées. Les mécanismes par lesquels les SH exercent leurs effets favorables sur les végétaux sont imprécis et généralement pas bien compris. [less ▲]

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See detailTest of humic substances on in vitro roots initiation using isolated leaves of woody species
Tahiri, Abdelghani ULg; Destain, Jacqueline ULg; Thonart, Philippe ULg et al

Poster (2014, May 15)

Arise from the chemical and biological degradation of plant and animal residues and from the synthetic activities of microorganisms in the soil, humic substances (HS) are natural heterogeneous aromatic ... [more ▼]

Arise from the chemical and biological degradation of plant and animal residues and from the synthetic activities of microorganisms in the soil, humic substances (HS) are natural heterogeneous aromatic and organic compounds. These substances are chemically complex with no clearly defined chemical structure, although generalized models have been proposed and they can be divided into fractions of humic acids, fulvic acids and humins depending on their solubility in water as a function of the pH. The stimulation of plant growth and development by HS are the activities that have attracted the attention of many scientists. They influence plant productivity directly by the stimulation of biochemical and metabolic processes or indirectly through the modification of soil characteristics and microflora activities. All together, these properties mainly affect root architecture. By inducing root hairs proliferation, differentiating root cells and enhancing lateral root emergence, an increase of the total root biomass is observed. Experiments targeting the rooting stages in absence of interferences were conducted in vitro using HS extracted from landfill leachate and a stable commercial formulation (“Humifirst” from TRADECORP company: 12% humic acid and fulvic acid 3%) issued from leonardite. Shoots and leaves explants of silver birch (Betula pendula Roth) and black alder (Alnus glutinosa L. Gaertn) vitro-plants were treated with 10 ppm leachate HS and 100 ppm Humifirst HS for 5 days during the rooting induction/initiation phase. The treated explants were then transferred into elongation medium containing only nitrate calcium for 4 weeks. The results show that application of HS during the root induction/initiation phase did not significantly influence root growth of both species in comparison with control explants. [less ▲]

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See detailPlants & metals in soil : the concept of phytoremediation
Evlard, Aricia ULg; Colinet, Gilles ULg; Druart, Philippe

Conference (2014, February 26)

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See detailProfiles of the volatile organic compounds emitted by the masses of Abies nordmanniana somatic embryos at maintenance and maturation stages
Druart, Philippe; Michels, Franck ULg; Misson, Jean-Pierre et al

Poster (2014, February 07)

Detailed reference viewed: 61 (9 ULg)