References of "Drapier, J.-M"
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See detailReverting foundry nickel-base superalloys
Lamberigts, M.; Lecomte-Beckers, Jacqueline ULg; Drapier, J.-M.

in International Conference on High Temperature Alloys for Gas Turbine and Other Applications (1986)

This work was part of a COST 50 project aimed at ways to make revert IN 100 less prone to soundness defects and associated property degradations. It was based on carrots cast from 5 master distinct master ... [more ▼]

This work was part of a COST 50 project aimed at ways to make revert IN 100 less prone to soundness defects and associated property degradations. It was based on carrots cast from 5 master distinct master melts, which were evaluated through metallography and Differential Thermal Analysis. Recycling was shown to affect grain size and morphology, carbide precipitation features, eutectic pool distribution and above all, microporosity level. The experimental evidence strongly suggests that, in revert master melts, carbides grow onto pre—existent nuclei made of TiN. This in turn reduces total heat of solidification, thus making the residual liquid substantially less fluid and consequently less capable of coxnpensating for solidification shrinkage in a dendrite structure which is more “tortuous”, because of its lower maturation rates. The effects of recycling can therefore be better accounted for in terms of bound nitrogen rather than of gas content as such. [less ▲]

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See detailThe investment casting and processing of cobalt-base and cobalt-bearing superalloys
Lamberigts, M.; Lecomte-Beckers, Jacqueline ULg; Walmag, G. et al

in Second Congress Cobalt Metallurgy and Uses (1985)

To cope with the demands of engine manufacturers and other users, superalloys have been brought to work in service at temperatures which represent a very substantial fraction of their melting point. In ... [more ▼]

To cope with the demands of engine manufacturers and other users, superalloys have been brought to work in service at temperatures which represent a very substantial fraction of their melting point. In addition to high temperature capability, they must exhibit mechanical strength, not only under static, but also under cyclic stressing conditions, and offer appropriate oxidation and corrosion resistance. This can only be achieved by tailoring their chemistry and processing conditions to the particular needs of the application under consideration. The evolution of component design and alloy chemistry, and some compositional effects and processing improvements in cast Ni-base superalloys are discussed. [less ▲]

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