References of "Dougados, M"
     in
Bookmark and Share    
Full Text
Peer Reviewed
See detailAssessment of long-term safety and efficacy of etanercept in a 5-year extension study in patients with rheumatoid arthritis.
Klareskog, L.; Gaubitz, M.; Rodriguez-Valverde, V. et al

in Clin Exp Rheumatol. 2011 Mar-Apr (2011)

Detailed reference viewed: 39 (2 ULg)
Full Text
Peer Reviewed
See detailClinical and ultrasonographic predictors of joint replacement for knee osteoarthritis: results from a large, 3-year, prospective EULAR study
Conaghan, P. G.; D'Agostino, M. A.; Le Bars, M. et al

in Annals of the Rheumatic Diseases (2010), 69

OBJECTIVES: To determine clinical and ultrasonographic predictors of joint replacement surgery across Europe in primary osteoarthritis (OA) of the knee. METHODS: This was a 3-year prospective study of a ... [more ▼]

OBJECTIVES: To determine clinical and ultrasonographic predictors of joint replacement surgery across Europe in primary osteoarthritis (OA) of the knee. METHODS: This was a 3-year prospective study of a painful OA knee cohort (from a EULAR-sponsored, multicentre study). All subjects had clinical evaluation, radiographs and ultrasonography (US) at study entry. The rate of knee replacement surgery over the 3-year follow-up period was determined using Kaplan-Meier survival data analyses. Predictive factors for joint replacement were identified by univariate log-rank test then multivariate analysis using a Cox proportional-hazards regression model. Potential baseline predictors included demographic, clinical, radiographic and US features. RESULTS: Of the 600 original patients, 531 (88.5%), mean age 67+/-10 years, mean disease duration 6.1+/-6.9 years, had follow-up data and were analysed. During follow-up (median 3 years; range 0-4 years), knee replacement was done or required for 94 patients (estimated event rate of 17.7%). In the multivariate analysis, predictors of joint replacement were as follows: Kellgren and Lawrence radiographic grade (grade > or =III vs <III, hazards ratio (HR) = 4.08 (95% CI 2.34 to 7.12), p<0.0001); ultrasonographic knee effusion (> or =4 mm vs <4 mm) (HR = 2.63 (95% CI 1.70 to 4.06), p<0.0001); knee pain intensity on a 0-100 mm visual analogue scale (> or =60 vs <60) (HR = 1.81 (95% CI 1.15 to 2.83), p=0.01) and disease duration (> or =5 years vs <5 years) (HR=1.63 (95% CI 1.08 to 2.47), p=0.02). Clinically detected effusion and US synovitis were not associated with joint replacement in the univariate analysis. CONCLUSION: Longitudinal evaluation of this OA cohort demonstrated significant progression to joint replacement. In addition to severity of radiographic damage and pain, US-detected effusion was a predictor of subsequent joint replacement. [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 15 (0 ULg)
Full Text
Peer Reviewed
See detailA long-term, open-label trial of the safety and efficacy of etanercept (Enbrel) in patients with rheumatoid arthritis not treated with other disease-modifying antirheumatic drugs
Klareskog, L.; Gaubitz, M.; Rodriguez-Valverde, V. et al

in Annals of the Rheumatic Diseases (2006), 65(12), 1578-1584

Objective: To evaluate the long-term safety and efficacy of etanercept in patients with rheumatoid arthritis. Methods: 549 patients entered this 5-year, open-label extension study and received etanercept ... [more ▼]

Objective: To evaluate the long-term safety and efficacy of etanercept in patients with rheumatoid arthritis. Methods: 549 patients entered this 5-year, open-label extension study and received etanercept 25 mg twice weekly. All patients showed inadequate responses to disease-modifying antirheumatic drugs before entry into the double-blind studies. Safety assessments were carried out at regular intervals. Primary efficacy end points were the numbers of painful and swollen joints; secondary variables included American College of Rheumatology (ACR) response rate, Disease Activity Score and acute-phase reactants. Efficacy was analysed using the last-observation-carried-forward approach. Results: Of the 549 patients enrolled in the open-label trial, 467 (85%), 414 (75%) and 371 (68%) completed 1, 2 and 3 years, respectively; 363 (66%) remained in the study at the time of this analysis. A total exposure of 1498 patient-years, including the double-blind study, was accrued. In the open-label trial, withdrawals for efficacy-related and safety-related reasons were 11% and 13%, respectively. Frequent adverse events included upper respiratory infections, flu syndrome, rash and injection-site reactions. Rates of serious infections and malignancies remained unchanged over the course of the study; there were no reports of patients with central demyelinating disease or serious blood dyscrasias. After 3 years, ACR20, ACR50 and ACR70 response rates were 78%, 51% and 27%, respectively. The Disease Activity Score score was reduced to 3.0 at 3 months and 2.6 at 3 years from 5.1. A sustained improvement was found in Health Assessment Questionnaire scores throughout the 3-year time period. Conclusion: After 3 years of treatment, etanercept showed sustained efficacy and a favourable safety profile. [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 22 (0 ULg)
Full Text
Peer Reviewed
See detailEULAR report on the use of ultrasonography in painful knee osteoarthritis. Part 1: Prevalence of inflammation in osteoarthritis
D'Agostino, M. A.; Conaghan, P.; Le Bars, M. et al

in Annals of the Rheumatic Diseases (2005), 64(12), 1703-1709

Objectives: To assess the prevalence of inflammation in subjects with chronic painful knee osteoarthritis (OA), as determined by the presence of synovitis or joint effusion at ultrasonography (US); and to ... [more ▼]

Objectives: To assess the prevalence of inflammation in subjects with chronic painful knee osteoarthritis (OA), as determined by the presence of synovitis or joint effusion at ultrasonography (US); and to evaluate the correlation between synovitis, effusion, and clinical parameters. Methods: A cross sectional, multicentre, European study was conducted under the umbrella of EULAR-ESCISIT. Subjects had primary chronic knee OA (ACR criteria) with pain during physical activity >= 30 mm for at least 48 hours. Clinical parameters were collected by a rheumatologist and an US examination of the painful knee was performed by a radiologist or rheumatologist within 72 hours of the clinical examination. Ultrasonographic synovitis was defined as synovial thickness >= 4 mm and diffuse or nodular appearance, and a joint effusion was defined as effusion depth >= 4 mm. Results: 600 patients with painful knee OA were analysed. At US 16 (2.7%) had synovitis alone, 85 (14.2%) had both synovitis and effusion, 177 (29.5%) had joint effusion alone, and 322 (53.7%) had no inflammation according to the definitions employed. Multivariate analysis showed that inflammation seen by US correlated statistically with advanced radiographic disease (Kellgren-Lawrence grade >= 3; odds ratio (OR) = 2.20 and 1.91 for synovitis and joint effusion, respectively), and with clinical signs and symptoms suggestive of an inflammatory "flare'', such as joint effusion on clinical examination (OR = 1.97 and 2.70 for synovitis and joint effusion, respectively) or sudden aggravation of knee pain (OR = 1.77 for joint effusion). Conclusion: US can detect synovial inflammation and effusion in painful knee OA, which correlate significantly with knee synovitis, effusion, and clinical parameters suggestive of an inflammatory "flare''. [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 19 (0 ULg)
Full Text
Peer Reviewed
See detailEULAR report on the use of ultrasonography in painful knee osteoarthritis. Part 2: exploring decision rules for clinical utility
Conaghan, P.; D'Agostino, M. A.; Ravaud, P. et al

in Annals of the Rheumatic Diseases (2005), 64(12), 1710-1714

BACKGROUND: Synovial inflammation (as defined by hypertrophy and effusion) is common in osteoarthritis (OA) and may be important in both pain and structural progression. OBJECTIVE: To determine if ... [more ▼]

BACKGROUND: Synovial inflammation (as defined by hypertrophy and effusion) is common in osteoarthritis (OA) and may be important in both pain and structural progression. OBJECTIVE: To determine if decision rules can be devised from clinical findings and ultrasonography (US) to allow recognition of synovial inflammation in patients with painful knee OA. METHODS: A EULAR-ESCISIT cross sectional, multicentre study enrolled subjects with painful OA knee who had clinical, radiographic, and US evaluations. A classification and regression tree (CART) analysis was performed to find combinations of predictor variables that would provide high sensitivity and specificity for clinically detecting synovitis and effusion in individual subjects. A range of definitions for the two key US variables, synovitis and effusion (using different combinations of synovial thickness, depth, and appearance), were also included in exploratory analyses. RESULTS: 600 patients with knee OA were included in the analysis. For both knee synovitis and joint effusion, the sensitivity and specificity were poor, yielding unsatisfactory likelihood ratios (75% sensitivity, 45% specificity, and positive LR of 1.36 for knee synovitis; 71.6% sensitivity, 43.2% specificity, and positive LR of 1.26 for joint effusion). The exploratory analyses did not improve the sensitivity and specificity (demonstrating positive LRs of between 1.26 and 1.57). CONCLUSION: Although it is possible to determine clinical and radiological predictors of OA inflammation in populations, CART analysis could not be used to devise useful clinical decision rules for an individual subject. Thus sensitive imaging techniques such as US remain the most useful tool for demonstrating synovial inflammation of the knee at the individual level. [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 10 (0 ULg)
Full Text
Peer Reviewed
See detailEfficacy and safety of adalimumab as monotherapy in patients with rheumatoid arthritis for whom previous disease modifying antirheumatic drug treatment has failed
van de Putte, B. A.; Atkins, C.; Malaise, Michel ULg et al

in Annals of the Rheumatic Diseases (2004), 63(5), 508-516

Objective: To evaluate the efficacy and safety of monotherapy with adalimumab in patients with RA for whom previous DMARD treatment has failed. Methods: In a 26 week, double blind, placebo controlled ... [more ▼]

Objective: To evaluate the efficacy and safety of monotherapy with adalimumab in patients with RA for whom previous DMARD treatment has failed. Methods: In a 26 week, double blind, placebo controlled, phase III trial, 544 patients with RA were randomised to monotherapy with adalimumab 20 mg every other week, 20 mg weekly, 40 mg every other week, 40 mg weekly, or placebo. The primary efficacy end point was greater than or equal to 20% improvement in the ACR core criteria (ACR20 response). Secondary efficacy end points included ACR50, ACR70, EULAR responses, and the Disability Index of the Health Assessment Questionnaire (HAQ DI). Results: After 26 weeks, patients treated with adalimumab 20 mg every other week, 20 mg weekly, 40 mg every other week, and 40 mg weekly had significantly better response rates than those treated with placebo: ACR20 (35.8%, 39.3%, 46.0%, 53.4%, respectively v 19.1%; pless than or equal to 0.01); ACR50 (18.9%, 20.5%, 22.1%, 35.0% v 8.2%; pless than or equal to 0.05); ACR70 (8.5%, 9.8%, 12.4%, 18.4% v 1.8%; pless than or equal to 0.05). Moderate EULAR response rates were significantly greater with adalimumab than with placebo (41.5%, 48.2%, 55.8%, 63.1% v 26.4%; pless than or equal to 0.05). Patients treated with adalimumab achieved better improvements in mean HAQ DI than those receiving placebo (-0.29, -0.39, -0.38, -0.49 v -0.07; pless than or equal to 0.01). No significant differences were found between adalimumab and placebo treated patients for serious adverse events, serious infections, or malignancies. Injection site reaction occurred in 10.6% and 0.9% of adalimumab and placebo treated patients, respectively (pless than or equal to 0.05). Conclusion: Among patients with RA for whom previous DMARD treatment had failed, adalimumab monotherapy achieved significant, rapid, and sustained improvements in disease activity and improved physical function and was safe and well tolerated. [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 16 (0 ULg)
Full Text
Peer Reviewed
See detailPrevention of early postmenopausal bone loss by strontium ranelate: The randomized, two-year, double-masked, dose-ranging, placebo-controlled PREVOS trial
Reginster, Jean-Yves ULg; Deroisy, Rita ULg; Dougados, M. et al

in Osteoporosis International (2002), 13(12), 925-931

Early postmenopausal women (n = 160) were randomised to receive placebo or strontium ranelate (SR) 125 mg/day, 500 mg/day or 1 g/day for 2 years (40 participants per group). All participants received ... [more ▼]

Early postmenopausal women (n = 160) were randomised to receive placebo or strontium ranelate (SR) 125 mg/day, 500 mg/day or 1 g/day for 2 years (40 participants per group). All participants received calcium 500 mg/day. The primary efficacy parameter was the percent variation in lumbar bone mineral density (BMD), measured using dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry. Secondary efficacy criteria included hip BMD and biochemical markers of bone turnover. At month 24, SR I g/day significantly increased lumbar BMD compared with placebo [mean (SD) +5.53% (5.12); p < 0.001] for measured values and [mean (SD) + 1.41% (5.33%); p < 0.05] for values adjusted for bone strontium content. The annual increase for adjusted values was +0.66% compared with -0.5% with placebo, with an overall beneficial effect after 2 years of about 2.4% with SR I g/day relative to placebo. There were no other significant between-group differences in adjusted lumbar BMD. Femoral neck and total hip BMD were also significantly increased at month 24 with SR I g/day compared with placebo [mean (SD): +2.46% (4.78) and +3.21% (4.68), respectively; both p < 0.001)]. SR 1 g/day significantly increased bone alkaline phosphatase at all time points (p < 0.05) compared with baseline and between-group analysis showed a significant increase, compared with placebo, at month 18 (p = 0.048). No effect on markers of bone resorption was observed. SR was as well tolerated as placebo. The minimum does at which SR is effective in preventing bone loss in early postmenopausal non-osteoporotic women is therefore 1 g/day. [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 10 (2 ULg)
Full Text
Peer Reviewed
See detailPrévention de la perte osseuse postménopausique par strontium ranelate
Roux, C; Dougados, M; Reginster, Jean-Yves ULg et al

in Revue du Rhumatisme (1999), 1bis

Detailed reference viewed: 10 (1 ULg)
Full Text
Peer Reviewed
See detailRecommendations for registration of drugs used in the treatment of osteoarthritis
Dougados, M; Devogelaer, JP; Annefeldt, M et al

in Annals of the Rheumatic Diseases (1996), 55

Detailed reference viewed: 5 (1 ULg)
Full Text
Peer Reviewed
See detailComparative double-blind multicenter study of the efficacy of tiludronate and etidronate in Paget's disease of bone
Roux, C; Gennari, C; Farrerons, J et al

in BONE (1995), 16(S1), 503

Detailed reference viewed: 13 (1 ULg)
Full Text
Peer Reviewed
See detailComparative prospective, double-blind, multicenter study of the efficacy of tiludronate and etidronate in the treatment of Paget's disease of bone.
Roux, C.; Gennari, C.; Farrerons, J. et al

in Arthritis and Rheumatism (1995), 38(6), 851-8

OBJECTIVE: To compare the efficacy and safety of tiludronate and etidronate at the same dosage (400 mg/day) for the treatment of active Paget's disease of bone. METHODS: We studied 234 patients with ... [more ▼]

OBJECTIVE: To compare the efficacy and safety of tiludronate and etidronate at the same dosage (400 mg/day) for the treatment of active Paget's disease of bone. METHODS: We studied 234 patients with radiologic lesions characteristic of Paget's disease of bone and serum alkaline phosphatase (AP) concentrations at least twice the upper limit of normal, in a prospective, randomized, double-blind, multicenter clinical trial lasting 6 months. Patients were randomly allocated into 1 of 3 treatment groups: tiludronate for 3 months followed by placebo for 3 months, tiludronate for 6 months, or etidronate for 6 months. Serum AP levels and urinary hydroxyproline excretion were measured at baseline and after 3 months and 6 months. Patients with a reduction of at least 50% in the serum AP concentration were considered to be responders. RESULTS: After 3 months, the proportion of responders was higher in the tiludronate group (57.4%) than in the etidronate group (13.9%) (P < 0.0001). In the etidronate group, this percentage was lower among patients who had received previous treatment with a bisphosphonate (2.3%) than among those who had not (28.6%) (P < 0.01). Previous bisphosphonate treatment was not associated with response in the tiludronate group. After 6 months, the proportion of responders did not differ between the 2 tiludronate groups (60.3% and 70.1%), but was lower in the etidronate group (25.3%) (P < 0.0001). There was a higher proportion of patients with treatment-resistant disease (< 25% reduction of serum AP) in the etidronate group (51.9%) than in the tiludronate 3-month group (17.9%) or the tiludronate 6-month group (19.5%) (P < 0.0001). Gastrointestinal disturbances were more common, and occurred earlier, with tiludronate, but they were mostly mild, requiring no treatment. CONCLUSION: Tiludronate at 400 mg/day for 3 months or 6 months is more effective than the same dosage of etidronate for 6 months in the treatment of Paget's disease. [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 6 (2 ULg)
Full Text
Peer Reviewed
See detailTiludronate et étidronate au cours de la maladie de Paget: étude comparative prospective, multicentrique en double aveugle
Roux, C; Gennari, C; Farrerons, I et al

in Revue du Rhumatisme (1994), 10

Detailed reference viewed: 11 (1 ULg)
Full Text
Peer Reviewed
See detailTiludronate and etidronate in Paget's disease of bone: a comparative prospective double-blind multicenter study
Roux, C; Gennari, C; Farrenons, J et al

in Journal of Bone and Mineral Research (1994), 9(S1), 296

Detailed reference viewed: 7 (1 ULg)
Full Text
Peer Reviewed
See detailEvidence that oral tiludronate is a highly effective therapy of Paget's disease of bone
Reginster, Jean-Yves ULg; Roux, C; Picot, C et al

in Journal of Bone and Mineral Research (1994), 25

Detailed reference viewed: 8 (1 ULg)