References of "Dony, Christophe"
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See detailEntre références et irrévérence : 20 ans de bandes dessinées made in Vertigo
Dony, Christophe ULg

Article for general public (2013)

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See detailAutour du super-héro: Variations et réécritures au sein du label Vertigo
Dony, Christophe ULg

Conference given outside the academic context (2013)

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See detailVertigo's Archival Impulse as Memorious Discourse
Dony, Christophe ULg

in Comics Forum (2013)

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See detailThe Rewriting Ethos of Vertigo Comics, or, Critical Perspectives on Memory-Making, Canonization, and the Logic of Fields
Dony, Christophe ULg

Conference (2013, May 25)

Vertigo, DC’s adult-oriented imprint, is often praised for having “fully joined the fight for adult readers” in the early 1990s (Weiner 2010: 10). Yet, little attention has been devoted to how this ... [more ▼]

Vertigo, DC’s adult-oriented imprint, is often praised for having “fully joined the fight for adult readers” in the early 1990s (Weiner 2010: 10). Yet, little attention has been devoted to how this “fight” has been played out. My contention is that Vertigo may have “redefined” the comics medium in developing a specific poetics which can be subsumed, albeit perhaps reductively, under the idea of “rewriting.” Intertextual strategies indeed pervade the Vertigo catalogue. The core titles that launched the label in the early 1990s (The Sandman, Animal Man, Swamp Thing, Hellblazer, Shade The Changing Man, and Doom Patrol), for example, are all critical transformations of characters from the DC universe. Other series such as Fables and Preacher critically engage with the revision and challenging of certain genres such as the Western or the fairy-tale. Yet other Vertigo narratives such as Uncle Sam, The Nobody, and Greendale rewrite and reinvent existing icons, stories, and cultural artefacts. This “rewriting ethos” seems pivotal to Vertigo’s development of a critical discourse on the history of the medium, to comics’ renewed perception and search for legitimacy. In exploring the specificities and implications of these intro- and retrospective discourses, I would like to show that Vertigo participates in a logic of commemoration and canon-making. More specifically, I would like to argue that Vertigo has used strategies of rewriting to support a distinctive agenda in the field of comics historiography, acquire “symbolic capital” (honor, prestige) and thereby possibly create a canon of its own which 1. undermines the dynamics of power relations structuring the field of American comics and 2. challenges Thierry Groensteen’s claim that comics is an “art without memory” that “gladly cultivates amnesia” (2006: 67, my translation). [less ▲]

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See detail(In)Visible Bodies: Rewriting the Politics of Passing in Incognegro, a Graphic Mystery by Mat Johnson and Warren Pleece
Dony, Christophe ULg

Conference (2013, January 03)

How can passing across racial lines be described and conveyed in the comics form? Can the medium develop specific strategies to comment on the themes of transgression and crossing inherent to the trope of ... [more ▼]

How can passing across racial lines be described and conveyed in the comics form? Can the medium develop specific strategies to comment on the themes of transgression and crossing inherent to the trope of passing? This paper shows how the graphic novel Incognegro (2008) goes beyond the traditional socio-historical analysis of passing and plays thematically, generically, and visually with the politics of the trope. Incognegro, set in the US in the early 1930s, depicts a light-skinned African American reporter who passes for white in order to investigate lynchings of blacks in the deep South. Because white papers do not consider these events to be news, the reporter condemns these dreadful acts in the column titled “Incognegro” that he writes for a New York-based newspaper, The New Holland Herald. Thus he risks his life using his “passing abilities” to protect the rights of the community he is trying to defend from white hegemony. In this way, Incognegro challenges the conventional tragic mulatto figure that passes for white to avoid racism and violence or to improve his/her social status. In addition, it echoes the common black trickster figure who practices “masking” to outwit his enemies or opponents, and calls into question the biological, social, and cultural representations of race as perceived by the white dominant group. Here the racial passer functions as an “outsider from within” who can challenge the black vs. white binary model. Moreover, the text subverts narrative paradigms from superhero comics and detective fiction to point out the arbitrariness of racial ideologies and the fallibility of notions of justice and truth. This subversion is further complicated by the comic’s “color free” art (black and white, sans halftones or gray tones), which defies essentialist representations of race. In sum, Incognegro argues that the ambiguities of racial categorization are best represented through a similarly ambiguous literary genre—one that not only challenges generic norms and traditions but also “writes back” to both the mainstream and alternative wings of American comics production. [less ▲]

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See detailLe Décalage, Marc-Antoine Matthieu (Delcourt, 2013)
Dony, Christophe ULg

Article for general public (2013)

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See detail"Notes for a War Story"
Dony, Christophe ULg

in Beaty, Bart; Weiner, Stephen (Eds.) Critical Survey of Graphic Novels: Independents and Underground Classics (2012)

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See detailFreedom, Memory, and Identity: The Paradoxical Individual/Collective Dialectic in Steve Darnall and Alex Ross’s Graphic Novel 'Uncle Sam'
Dony, Christophe ULg

Conference (2012, March)

As his star-spangled costume and his usually firm posturing suggest, Uncle Sam impersonates the United States and symbolically reflects the nation’s most cherished values and ideals such as freedom ... [more ▼]

As his star-spangled costume and his usually firm posturing suggest, Uncle Sam impersonates the United States and symbolically reflects the nation’s most cherished values and ideals such as freedom, exceptionalism, and (masculine) strength. As such, he connects the projects of nationalism and patriotism with the scale of the individual. In other words, he embodies the American motto ‘out of many, one.’ Steve Darnall and Alex Ross’s rewriting of the character, however, strongly contrast with this dominant perception of Uncle Sam in their eponymous 1997 graphic novel. Their narrative shows a distressed and lunatic homeless man wandering the streets of an unknown American city. As he roams the streets, he undergoes an identity crisis that coincides with a crisis of memory, both of which complicate the relation between the symbolic individual body and the collective American unconscious. On the one hand, the character represents the values of freedom and democracy that the US government has strived to implement. On the other, he realizes that the paradigm of the nation cannot be understood as a monolithic entity, and that the plurality of voices that inhabit his persona – and, quite paradoxically, the country – cannot uphold this meta-narrative of American unity. In asking whether or not Uncle Sam is one of U.S., Darnall and Ross comment on the paradoxes of freedom and the myth of the melting pot. [less ▲]

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See detailMoving Between Worlds: 'The Arrival'
Dony, Christophe ULg

in The Comics Grid: Journal of Comics Scholarship. Year One (2012), 1

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See detailReview of Françoise Kral's 'Critical Identities in Contemporary Anglophone Diasporic Literature'
Dony, Christophe ULg

in South Asian Diaspora (2012), 4(1), 117-119

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See detailL'Association. Une utopie éditoriale et esthétique
Groupe ACME; Dejasse, Erwin ULg; Habrand, Tanguy ULg et al

Book published by Les Impressions nouvelles (2011)

L’Association, Une utopie éditoriale et esthétique est le premier volume d’histoire et d’analyse consacré à ce projet à tous égards exceptionnel. Richement illustré, interrogeant l’économie globale du ... [more ▼]

L’Association, Une utopie éditoriale et esthétique est le premier volume d’histoire et d’analyse consacré à ce projet à tous égards exceptionnel. Richement illustré, interrogeant l’économie globale du collectif, ses auteurs et ses réalisations, mais aussi ses crises de croissance, L’Association, Une utopie éditoriale et esthétique est aussi l’œuvre de passionnés de bande dessinée. Passant d’un chapitre chronologique à une étude sémiotique, d’un article critique à une analyse esthétique, l’ouvrage forme un ensemble généreux et passionnant. Il offre plus de deux cents pages d’images célèbres et de documents rares qui nous donnent envie de (re)découvrir les auteurs et les albums de L’Association. Bel hommage éditorial, ce superbe album donne à voir et à comprendre vingt ans d’édition et de croisades esthétiques. [less ▲]

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See detailComix 2000
Dony, Christophe ULg

in Groupe ACME (Ed.) L'Association: Une utopie éditoriale et esthétique (2011)

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See detailL’image a la parole: 73304-23-4153-6-96-8
Dony, Christophe ULg

in Groupe Acme (Ed.) L'Association: Une utopie éditoriale et esthétique (2011)

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See detailPortraying 9/11: Essays on Representations in Comics, Literature, Film and Theatre
Bragard, Véronique; Dony, Christophe ULg; Rosenberg, Warren

Book published by McFarland (2011)

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See detailIntroduction
Bragard, Véronique; Dony, Christophe ULg; Rosenberg, Warren

in Bragard, Véronique; Dony, Christophe; Rosenberg, Warren (Eds.) Portraying 9/11: Essays on Representations in Comics, Literature, Film and Theatre (2011)

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See detail(In)visible Bodies: Crossing Racial Lines in the Graphic Novel
Dony, Christophe ULg

Conference (2011)

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