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See detailESC working group on valvular heart disease position paper-heart valve clinics: organization, structure, and experiences
LANCELLOTTI, Patrizio ULg; Rosenhek, R; Pibarot, P et al

in European Heart Journal (2013)

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See detailLow-Flow, Low-Gradient Severe Aortic Stenosis Despite Normal Ejection Fraction Is Associated With Severe Left Ventricular Dysfunction as Assessed by Speckle-Tracking Echocardiography: A Multicenter Study.
Adda, J.; Mielot, C.; Giorgi, R. et al

in Circulation: cardiovascular imaging (2012)

Background- Low-flow low-gradient (LFLG) is sometimes observed in severe aortic stenosis (AS) despite normal ejection fraction, but its frequency and mechanisms are still debated. We aimed to describe the ... [more ▼]

Background- Low-flow low-gradient (LFLG) is sometimes observed in severe aortic stenosis (AS) despite normal ejection fraction, but its frequency and mechanisms are still debated. We aimed to describe the characteristics of patients with LFLG AS and assess the presence of longitudinal left ventricular dysfunction in these patients. Methods and Results- In a multicenter prospective study, 340 consecutive patients with severe AS and normal ejection fraction were studied. Longitudinal left ventricular function was assessed by 2D-strain and global afterload by valvulo-arterial impedance. Patients were classified according to flow and gradient: low flow was defined as a stroke volume index ≤35 mL/m(2), low gradient as a mean gradient ≤40 mm Hg. Most patients (n=258, 75.9%) presented with high-gradient AS, and 82 patients (24.1%) with low-gradient AS. Among the latter, 52 (15.3%) presented with normal flow and low gradient and 30 (8.8%) with LFLG. As compared with normal flow and low gradient, patients with LFLG had more severe AS (aortic valve area=0.7±0.12 cm(2) versus 0.86±0.14 cm(2)), higher valvulo-arterial impedance (5.5±1.1 versus 4±0.8 mm Hg/mL/m(2)), and worse longitudinal left ventricular function (basal longitudinal strain=-11.6±3.4 versus -14.8±3%; P<0.001 for all). Conclusions- LFLG AS is observed in 9% of patients with severe AS and normal ejection fraction and is associated with high global afterload and reduced longitudinal systolic function. Patients with normal-flow low-gradient AS are more frequent and present with less severe AS, normal afterload, and less severe longitudinal dysfunction. Severe left ventricular longitudinal dysfunction is a new explanation to the concept of LFLG AS. [less ▲]

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See detailClinical outcome in asymptomatic severe aortic stenosis: Insights from the new proposed aortic stenosis grading classification
Lancellotti, Patrizio ULg; Magne, Julien ULg; Donal, E. et al

in Journal of the American College of Cardiology (2012), 59(3), 235-243

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See detailImpact of aortic stenosis on longitudinal myocardial deformation during exercise.
Donal, E.; Thebault, C.; O'Connor, K. et al

in European Journal of Echocardiography (2011)

In aortic stenosis (AS), left ventricular (LV) adaptation to exercise has poorly been examined. Changes in LV ejection fraction may lack accuracy in identifying the presence of intrinsic myocardial ... [more ▼]

In aortic stenosis (AS), left ventricular (LV) adaptation to exercise has poorly been examined. Changes in LV ejection fraction may lack accuracy in identifying the presence of intrinsic myocardial impairment. AIMS: We sought to determine the impact of aortic stenosis (AS) on left ventricular (LV) longitudinal function at exercise in a series of asymptomatic patients with AS and preserved LV ejection fraction. METHODS AND RESULTS: Long-axis function was assessed at rest and at exercise by using 2D speckle tracking of myocardial deformation in 207 AS patients (aortic valve area 0.87 ± 0.19 cm²) and 43 aged-matched control subjects. When compared with control subjects, patients with AS have reduced longitudinal myocardial function at rest (-20.2 ± 2.7 vs. -15.4 ± 4.0%) and at peak exercise (-25.0 ± 3.7 vs. -16.5 ± 4.9%) (P < 0.0001 for both). Exercise changes in global longitudinal strain were correlated with changes in LV ejection in controls but not in patients with AS. Changes in LV global longitudinal strain during test were lower in AS patients with an abnormal response to exercise (-0.5 ± 2.7 vs. -1.5 ± 2.8%, P = 0.001). In multivariate analysis, a lower global longitudinal strain at rest (P = 0.04), a higher increase in mean trans-valvular pressure gradient (P < 0.001) at exercise, and smaller exercise-induced changes in global longitudinal strain (P < 0.001) were associated with an abnormal exercise test. CONCLUSION: In AS, subnormal LV function can be reliably identified by 2D strain imaging at rest and during a sub-maximal exercise. That sensitive measure of LV systolic function is depressed in AS and even more in patients having the most severe AS. [less ▲]

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See detailDeterminant and Impact on Outcome of Exercise Pulmonary Hypertension in Asymptomatic Severe Aortic Stenosis.
Magne, Julien ULg; Donal, E; O'Connor, K et al

Conference (2011)

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See detailExercise Pulmonary Hypertension in Asymptomatic Severe Aortic Stenosis.
Magne, Julien ULg; Donal, E; O'Connor, K et al

Conference (2011)

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See detailExercise echocardiography in severe asymptomatic aortic stenosis.
O'Connor, K.; LANCELLOTTI, Patrizio ULg; Donal, E. et al

in Archives of Cardiovascular Diseases (2010), 103(4), 262-269

The management of asymptomatic patients with severe aortic stenosis is challenging. Unfortunately, evaluation of symptoms such as dyspnoea remains subjective. The use of exercise echocardiography may help ... [more ▼]

The management of asymptomatic patients with severe aortic stenosis is challenging. Unfortunately, evaluation of symptoms such as dyspnoea remains subjective. The use of exercise echocardiography may help to predict major events in patients with asymptomatic severe aortic stenosis. This article explains how to perform the test and discusses which echocardiographic measurements should be obtained, focusing on the diagnostic and prognostic value of these measurements. An increase in mean transaortic pressure gradient >or= 18 mmHg predicts a worse prognosis in patients with severe aortic stenosis. The absence of left ventricular contractile reserve also has an important prognostic impact. Evaluation of filling pressures and looking for a worsening or a new mitral regurgitation are also part of the exam. Further studies are required to determine whether surgery should be recommended in the presence of an abnormal exercise echocardiogram in severe asymptomatic aortic stenosis. [less ▲]

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