References of "Dijk, Derk-Jan"
     in
Bookmark and Share    
Full Text
Peer Reviewed
See detailCircadian dynamics in measures of cortical excitation and inhibition balance
Chellappa, Sarah; Gaggioni, Giulia ULg; LY, Julien ULg et al

in Scientific Reports (2016), 6:33661

Detailed reference viewed: 20 (8 ULg)
Full Text
Peer Reviewed
See detailLocal modulation of human brain responses by circadian rhythmicity and sleep debt
Muto, Vincenzo ULg; Jaspar, Mathieu ULg; Meyer, Christelle et al

in Science (2016), 351(6300),

Detailed reference viewed: 39 (7 ULg)
Peer Reviewed
See detailSeasonal variation in human COGNITIVE brain responses
Meyer, Christelle; Muto, Vincenzo ULg; Jaspar, Mathieu ULg et al

Poster (2016, June)

Detailed reference viewed: 15 (3 ULg)
Full Text
Peer Reviewed
See detailSeasonality in human cognitive brain responses
Meyer, Christelle ULg; Muto, Vincenzo ULg; Jaspar, Mathieu ULg et al

in Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America (2016)

Detailed reference viewed: 121 (15 ULg)
Full Text
Peer Reviewed
See detailCircadian regulation of human cortical excitability
LY, Julien ULg; Gaggioni, Giulia ULg; Chellappa, Sarah et al

in Nature Communications (2016)

Detailed reference viewed: 39 (4 ULg)
See detailSeasonality in human cognitive brain responses.
Meyer, Christelle ULg; Muto, Vincenzo ULg; Jaspar, Mathieu ULg et al

Poster (2015, September 04)

Detailed reference viewed: 196 (11 ULg)
Peer Reviewed
See detailHuman cortical excitability depends on time awake and circadian phase
Gaggioni, Giulia ULg; Ly, Julien; Chellappa, Sarah Laxhmi ULg et al

Poster (2015, January 27)

Detailed reference viewed: 54 (16 ULg)
Full Text
See detailHuman cortical excitability depends on time spent awake and circadian phase
Ly, Julien ULg; Gaggioni, Giulia ULg; Chellappa, Sarah Laxhmi ULg et al

Scientific conference (2014, October 04)

At any point in time, human performance results from the interaction of two main factors: a circadian signal varying with the time of the day and the sleep need accrued throughout the preceding waking ... [more ▼]

At any point in time, human performance results from the interaction of two main factors: a circadian signal varying with the time of the day and the sleep need accrued throughout the preceding waking period. But what’s happen at the cortical cerebral level? We used a novel technique coupling transcranial magnetic stimulation with electroencephalography (TMS/EEG) to assess the influence of time spent awake and circadian phasis on human cortical excitability. Twenty-two healthy young men underwent 8 TMS/EEG sessions during a 28 hour sleep deprivation protocole. We found that cortical excitability depends on both time spent awake and circadian phasis. [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 54 (10 ULg)
Full Text
See detailHuman cortical excitability depends on time awake and circadian phase
Ly, Julien ULg; Chellappa, Sarah Laxhmi ULg; Gaggioni, Giulia ULg et al

Conference (2014, September 17)

At any point in time, human performance results from the interaction of two main factors: a circadian signal varying with the time of the day and the sleep need accrued throughout the preceding waking ... [more ▼]

At any point in time, human performance results from the interaction of two main factors: a circadian signal varying with the time of the day and the sleep need accrued throughout the preceding waking period. But what’s happen at the cortical cerebral level? We used a novel technique coupling transcranial magnetic stimulation with electroencephalography (TMS/EEG) to assess the influence of time spent awake and circadian phasis on human cortical excitability. Twenty-two healthy young men underwent 8 TMS/EEG sessions during a 28 hour sleep deprivation protocole. We found that cortical excitability depends on both time spent awake and circadian phasis. [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 74 (14 ULg)
Full Text
Peer Reviewed
See detailHuman cortical excitability depends on time spent awake and circadian phase
Ly, Julien ULg; Chellappa, Sarah Laxhmi ULg; Gaggioni, Giulia ULg et al

Conference (2014, September 17)

At any point in time, human performance results from the interaction of two main factors: a circadian signal varying with the time of the day and the sleep need accrued throughout the preceding waking ... [more ▼]

At any point in time, human performance results from the interaction of two main factors: a circadian signal varying with the time of the day and the sleep need accrued throughout the preceding waking period. But what’s happen at the cortical cerebral level? We used a novel technique coupling transcranial magnetic stimulation with electroencephalography (TMS/EEG) to assess the influence of time spent awake and circadian phasis on human cortical excitability. Twenty-two healthy young men underwent 8 TMS/EEG sessions during a 28 hour sleep deprivation protocole. We found that cortical excitability depends on both time spent awake and circadian phasis. [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 62 (14 ULg)
Full Text
Peer Reviewed
See detailCortical excitability dynamics of during sleep deprivation set PVT performance
Borsu, Chloé; Gaggioni, Giulia ULg; Ly, Julien ULg et al

Poster (2014, September)

Detailed reference viewed: 25 (9 ULg)
Full Text
Peer Reviewed
See detailThe circadian system sets the temporal organization of basic human neuronal function
Chellappa, Sarah Laxhmi ULg; Ly, Julien; Gaggioni, Giulia ULg et al

Conference (2014, June 16)

Detailed reference viewed: 28 (7 ULg)
Full Text
Peer Reviewed
See detailNeuroimaging, cognition, light and circadian rhythms
Gaggioni, Giulia ULg; Maquet, Pierre ULg; Schmidt, Christina ULg et al

in Frontiers in Systems Neuroscience [=FNSYS] (2014)

Detailed reference viewed: 77 (21 ULg)
Peer Reviewed
See detailSleep loss changes executive brain responses in the wake maintenance zone
Jaspar, Mathieu ULg; Meyer, Christelle ULg; Muto, Vincenzo ULg et al

Conference (2014)

Objectives:Brain mechanisms underlying executive processes are regulated by circadian and sleep homeostatic processes. Furthermore, during sleep deprivation (SD), cognitive performance and neural ... [more ▼]

Objectives:Brain mechanisms underlying executive processes are regulated by circadian and sleep homeostatic processes. Furthermore, during sleep deprivation (SD), cognitive performance and neural responses are differentially modulated by a clock gene PERIOD3 polymorphism. Here, we investigated interindividual differences on executive brain responses under SD. Critically, we focused on the circadian evening wake maintenance zone (WMZ), a key time-point for sleep-wake regulation. Methods:Thirty healthy young volunteers, genotyped for the PER3 polymorphism (10 PER3 5/5;20 PER3 4/4 homozygotes), underwent42-h SD under constant routine conditions. They performed a 3-back working memorytask in 13successivefMRI sessions. To compare neural activity in the WMZ before and during SD, sessions were realigned according to individual dim light melatonin onset. Results:We tested for a group (PER3 5/5>PER3 4/4) by session effect (WMZ before vs. during SD). From the first evening WMZ(i.e. during a normal waking day) to the second (i.e. following 40h of continuous waking), PER3 5/5 individuals relative toPER3 4/4 showed significantly larger increase in responsesin the left mid-cingulate, bilateral precuneus and thalamus. Interestingly, these regions are involved in executive processes and arousal regulation (thalamus). Conclusions:These results show that the strong circadian wake-maintenance signal depends on sleep pressure, in a PER3-genotype dependent manner. Interestingly, pronounced genotype differences wereobserved in the thalamus, an area that compensates potential lower cortical activity under SD. [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 71 (6 ULg)