References of "Dieng, Abdoulaye"
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See detailELEVAGE DES POULETS TRADITIONNELS OU INDIGÈNES AU SÉNÉGAL ET EN AFRIQUE SUBSAHARIENNE : Etat des lieux et contraintes
Ayssiwede, Simplice Bosco; Dieng, Abdoulaye; Houinato, M.R.B. et al

in Annales de Médecine Vétérinaire (2013), 158

Cette synthèse aborde les multiples rôles (sociaux, culturels, économiques, religieux, alimentaires et agricoles) de l’aviculture villageoise dans la lutte contre la pauvreté et l’insécurité alimentaire ... [more ▼]

Cette synthèse aborde les multiples rôles (sociaux, culturels, économiques, religieux, alimentaires et agricoles) de l’aviculture villageoise dans la lutte contre la pauvreté et l’insécurité alimentaire des populations africaines. Elle décrit les caractéristiques des différents systèmes existants (extensif et amélioré) et les pratiques d’alimentation observées dans ce sous-secteur avicole. Après avoir passé en revue les variétés phénotypiques existantes dans la population de poules locales africaines et les performances zootechniques des sujets exploités au Sénégal et dans diverses régions d’Afrique subsaharienne, elle met un accent particulier sur les différentes contraintes (précarité des d’habitats, fortes mortalités, maladies aviaires, prédateurs, irrégularité et déficit d’approvisionnement alimentaire, accès au crédit…) qui freinent le développement de l’aviculture traditionnelle au Sénégal et en Afrique subsaharienne. [less ▲]

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See detailPrincipes toxiques, toxicité et technologie de détoxification de la graine de Jatropha curcas L. (synthèse bibliographique)
Nesseim, Thierry Daniel Tamsir; Fillet, Marianne ULg; Mergeai, Guy ULg et al

in Biotechnologie, Agronomie, Société et Environnement = Biotechnology, Agronomy, Society and Environment [=BASE] (2012), 16(4), 531-540

The use of meal from the crushing of Jatropha curcas seed for livestock feed is limited owing to the variable amounts of seed available. This availability depends on the level and variety of toxic and ... [more ▼]

The use of meal from the crushing of Jatropha curcas seed for livestock feed is limited owing to the variable amounts of seed available. This availability depends on the level and variety of toxic and antinutritional compounds contained in the seed at a given time; the most important of these compounds are phorbol esters and curcin. The phorbol esters present in J. curcas seed are euphorbiaceae diterpenes, known for their inflammatory action resulting in irritation and toxicity to insects, fish and mammals. These compounds are sometimes completely degraded in soil and they may be reduced by physical, chemical or biological processes, with a reduction ratio of between 50 and 95%. Curcin is an irritating toxalbumin with lectin activity; it is inactivated by heat treatment at 121 °C for 30 min. Other antinutritional compounds are also present in J. curcas seed, such as saponins and an inhibitor of trypsin activity. This trypsin-inhibiting compound interferes with the digestion process and its reduction is achieved through thermal, chemical or biological treatments. The elimination of, or at least a reduction in the levels of, these molecules represents a rerequisite for using J. curcas meal in the livestock feed sector. [less ▲]

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See detaileffets de la substitution totale du tourteau d’arachide par la fève de coton glandless sur les performances zootechniques de poulets de chair au sénégal
Diaw, Mamadou; Dieng, Abdoulaye; Mergeai, Guy ULg et al

in Revue d'Elévage et de Médecine Vétérinaire des Pays Tropicaux (2012), 65(1-2), 17-23

The performances of broilers fed a diet in which the groundnut cake was totally replaced by glandless cottonseed kernels (FCG) were compared to those of animals fed an experimental control diet (Tém_E), a ... [more ▼]

The performances of broilers fed a diet in which the groundnut cake was totally replaced by glandless cottonseed kernels (FCG) were compared to those of animals fed an experimental control diet (Tém_E), a commercial diet (Tém_C), and a very simple diet containing only corn, FCG and a mineral and vitamin concentrate. From the start, the Tém_C and FCG animals showed the highest growths. After 43 days of breeding, there were major differences in body weights between the groups, essentially caused by differences in feed intake, so that the best growth rates were not necessarily linked to better feed conversion ratios. Low body weights, low intakes and high mortality levels were observed with the simple diet. [less ▲]

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See detailLes co-produits de la graine de coton en alimentation du poulet de chair
Diaw, Mahamadou Tandiang; Dieng, Abdoulaye; Mergeai, Guy ULg et al

in Annales de Médecine Vétérinaire (2011), 155

Cottonseed by-products arevery high in nutrients and theirchemical composition varieshighly according to the varietiesof cotton and the various treatmentsaiming at extracting oil.Their use in animal ... [more ▼]

Cottonseed by-products arevery high in nutrients and theirchemical composition varieshighly according to the varietiesof cotton and the various treatmentsaiming at extracting oil.Their use in animal nutrition, andparticularly in broilers, is especiallylimited by the free gossypolwhich can damage varioustissues and also decreases theperformances of growth and dietefficiency. The incorporation ofcottonseed meal in broilers dietmay be increased following chemicalbinding of free gossypol,but these methods have drawbacks.Ferrous sulfate denaturesfeed and the use of lysine to bindgossypol is limited by the expensivenessof this product while thebiological fermentation is verycomplex and inapplicable, as tonow, on a large way. Glandlessvarieties could be incorporatedat a very high level in diets andtherefore could contribute todecrease the protein feed requirements.Unfortunately, agronomicconstraints associated to thesecrops have limited the research inthis way. The production of varietiesin which gossypol secretionwould be inhibited before theseed germination should alleviatethe limitations associated to cottonby-products. [less ▲]

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See detailGrowth performances, carcass and organs characteristics and economics results of growing indigenous senegal chickens fed diets containing various levels of leuceana leucocephala (Lam.) leaves meal (2011)
Ayssiwede, Simplice; Chrysostome, C.A.A.M.; Zanmenou, J.C. et al

in International Journal of Poultry Sciences (2011), 10(9), 1132-1145

The aim of this study carried out from September to December 2010 was to evaluate the effects of Leuceana leucocephala leaves meal inclusion in the diets on growth performances, carcass and organs ... [more ▼]

The aim of this study carried out from September to December 2010 was to evaluate the effects of Leuceana leucocephala leaves meal inclusion in the diets on growth performances, carcass and organs characteristics and economics results of growing indigenous Senegal chickens. One hundred and four (104) indigenous Senegal chicks of 4 weeks old were randomly allocated into four groups of 26 chicks each with similar body weight. Each group subdivided in two repetitions of 13 birds, corresponded to each of the four (4) dietary treatments LL0, LL7, LL14 and LL21 containing respectively 0, 7, 14 and 21% of Leuceana leaves meal in substitution of groundnut cake meal. During the experiment (5-17th week old), zootechnical parameters of birds and economical data were recorded and analyzed per dietary treatment. At the end of the 13 weeks trial, the final Live Body Weights (LBW) were 864 g, 1166.48 g, 905 g and 887.16 g/bird, the Average Daily Weight Gain (ADWG) were 7.77 g, 10.88 g, 8.15 g and 8.10 g/day, the Daily Feed Intake (DFI) of 39.86 g, 51 g, 40.39 g and 44.75 g/bird and the Feed Conversion Ratio (FCR) of 7.04, 5.54, 6.27 and 6.80 respectively for birds fed LL0, LL7, LL14 and LL21 diets. The Leuceana leaves meal inclusion in the diets up to 21% had not caused any adverse effect on LBW, ADWG, DFI, FCR, mortality, carcass and organs characteristics in birds compared to their controls. Apart from the dark yellowing of abdominal fat of carcasses from birds fed LL21 diet, significantly better growth performances, feed costs and economic margins were recorded in birds fed LL7 and LL14 diets. Thus, these two dietary treatments were the only most economically profitable (respectively 214 and 48 FCFA/kg carcass of additional profit) compared to the control. [less ▲]

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See detailEffects of Moringa oleifera (Lam.) leaves meal incorporation in diets on growth performances, carcass characteristics and economics results of growing indigenous senegal chicken
Ayssiwede, Simplice; Dieng, Abdoulaye; Bello, H et al

in Pakistan Journal of Nutrition (2011), 10(12), 1132-1145

The purpose of this study carried out from July to October 2010 was to assess the effects of Moringa oleifera leaves meal inclusion in diets on growth performances, carcass and organs characteristics and ... [more ▼]

The purpose of this study carried out from July to October 2010 was to assess the effects of Moringa oleifera leaves meal inclusion in diets on growth performances, carcass and organs characteristics and economics results of growing indigenous Senegal chickens. Ninety six (96) indigenous Senegal chicks of 5 weeks old were randomly allocated into four groups of 24 chicks each with similar body weight. Each group subdivided in two repetitions of 12 birds, corresponded to each of the four (4) dietary treatments MO0, MO8, MO16 and MO24 containing respectively 0, 8, 16 and 24% of Moringa leaves meal in substitution of groundnut cake meal. During the experiment (6-17th week old), zootechnical parameters of birds and economical data were recorded and analyzed per dietary treatment. At the end of the 12 weeks trial, the final Live Body Weights (LBW) were 721.60 g, 911.70 g, 812.85 g and 720.05 g/bird, the average daily weight gain (ADWG) were 6.49 g, 8.77 g, 7.61 g and 6.50 g/day, the Daily Feed Intake (DFI) of 39.10 g, 39.76 g, 36.28 g and 34.24 g/bird and the Feed Conversion Ratio (FCR) of 7.58, 5.75, 6.11 et 7.24 respectively for birds fed MO0, MO8, MO16 and MO24 diets. The Moringa leaves meal inclusion in the diets up to 24% had not caused any adverse impact on LBW, ADWG, FCR, mortality, carcass and organs characteristics in birds compared to their controls. Except the significantly decrease of DFI obtained in birds of MO16 and MO24 treatments, significantly better growth performances, feed costs and economic margins were recorded in birds fed MO8 and MO16 diets. Thus these two dietary treatments were the only most economically profitable (respectively 357 and 206 FCFA/kg carcass of additional profit) compared to the control. [less ▲]

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See detailUtilisation digestive et métabolique et valeur nutritionnelle de la farine de feuilles de Cassia tora (Linn.) incorporée dans la ration alimentaire des poulets indigènes du Sénégal
Ayssiwede, Simplice Bosco; Chrysostome, Christian; Ossebi, W. et al

in Revue de Médecine Vétérinaire (2010), 161(12), 549-558

In the prospect of the Cassia tora leaves meal recovering as a protein ingredient source for diets of Senegal indigenous chickens, a study was carried out to determine their nutrient utilisation and ... [more ▼]

In the prospect of the Cassia tora leaves meal recovering as a protein ingredient source for diets of Senegal indigenous chickens, a study was carried out to determine their nutrient utilisation and nutritional value. Twenty adult Senegal indigenous chickens were housed in metabolic cages and allotted in four groups of five birds each. The groups were corresponding to four dietary treatments (CT0, CT5, CT10 and CT15) containing respectively 0, 5, <br />10 and 15% of cassia leaves meal in substitution of groundnut cake meal. The cassia leaves are relatively rich in protein (27.4% DM), crude fibre (16.8% DM), NDF (25.7% DM) and ash (15.2% DM), particularly in calcium (3.1%) and potassium (1.3% DM). It contained 3.8% DM, 36.8% DM and 2050.47kcal/kg DM of ether extract, nitrogen-free extract and metabolizable <br />energy, respectively. Except for fat, the inclusion of Cassia tora leaves meal in the indigenous poultry diets until 15% has no significant adverse effect on nutrient and energy utilization, feed intake, average daily weight gain and feed conversion of the Senegal indigenous poultry. It significantly improved the crude fibre and ash utilization from 5% dietary treatment (CT5). [less ▲]

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See detailEffect of groundnut cake substitution by glandless cottonseed kernels on broilers production: animal performance, nutrient digestibility, carcass characteristics and fatty acid composition of muscle and fat
Diaw, Mamadou Tandiang; Dieng, Abdoulaye; Mergeai, Guy ULg et al

in International Journal of Poultry Sciences (2010), 9(5), 473-481

A study has been conducted with broilers to assess, during the rainy season, the effects of groundnut cake substitution by glandless Cottonseed Kernel (CSK), at levels of 0, 25, 50 and 75%. The ... [more ▼]

A study has been conducted with broilers to assess, during the rainy season, the effects of groundnut cake substitution by glandless Cottonseed Kernel (CSK), at levels of 0, 25, 50 and 75%. The substitution improved linearly feed intake and animal growth, as well as carcass component weights and allometric parameters. The CSK increased the C18:2 n-6 to C18:1 n-9 ratio, as well in diet as in meat and subcutaneous fat. In order to explain the observed performances, the possibility is considered that broilers used preferentially C18:2 n-6 fatty acids for their metabolism. Complete glandless cottonseed kernels are probably highly valuable for broilers production in warm and wet conditions. [less ▲]

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See detailEffets de la substitution du tourteau d’arachide par la fève de coton conventionnel en production de poulet de chair au Sénégal
Diaw, Mamadou Tandiang; Dieng, Abdoulaye; Mergeai, Guy ULg et al

in Tropicultura (2010), 28(3), 139-147

A study has been conducted on 400 chicks to evaluate conventional cottonseed kernels on broilers production. Groundnut cake has been substituted by cottonseed kernels at 0, 25, 50 and 75% levels ... [more ▼]

A study has been conducted on 400 chicks to evaluate conventional cottonseed kernels on broilers production. Groundnut cake has been substituted by cottonseed kernels at 0, 25, 50 and 75% levels. Cottonseed kernel incorporation decreased significantly (p< 0.001) the growing parameters, feed intake, feed efficiency and nutrients digestibility of the experimental diets. This reduction was proportional to the level of substitution. The study suggests that only the level of gossypol in cottonseed kernels limits their incorporation in broilers diets and that this by-product should be excluded from the formulation in broilers production or that its level of incorporation should be limited to a maximal level of 10% when production duration is not a constraint for breeders. [less ▲]

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See detailDigestibility and Metabolic Utilization and Nutritional Value of Leucaena leucocephala (Lam.) Leaves Meal Incorporated in the Diets of Indigenous Senegal Chickens
Ayssiwede, Simplice Bosco; Dieng, Abdoulaye; Chrysostome, Christophe et al

in International Journal of Poultry Sciences (2010), 9(8), 767-776

In the prospect of the Leuceana leucocephala leaves meal using as a protein ingredient source for indigenous Senegal chickens diets, a study was carried out to determine their nutrient utilization and ... [more ▼]

In the prospect of the Leuceana leucocephala leaves meal using as a protein ingredient source for indigenous Senegal chickens diets, a study was carried out to determine their nutrient utilization and nutritional value when incorporated at various levels in the diets. Twenty adult indigenous chickens with an average body weight of 1.22 kg were conducted in metabolic cages and allocated in four groups of five birds each. The groups were corresponded to four dietary treatments (LL0, LL7, LL14 and LL21) containing respectively 0, 7, 14 and 21% of Leuceana leaves meal. During the trial, birds were weighed at the beginning and at the end. Feed offered and refused, collected fresh excreta were weighed daily and the droppings were oven-dried at 60oC and ground per bird for six days. The ingredients and experimental diets used and collected excreta were subjected to chemical analyses. Results showed that the Leuceana leaves were relatively rich in protein (24.9% DM), ether extract (6.4% DM), crude fiber (14.2% DM) and Neutral detergent fiber (22.4% DM). It contained respectively 43.1% and 11.4% DM of nitrogen free extract and ash, particularly calcium (1.8%) and potassium (1.1% DM) and 2573.8 kcal/kg DM of metabolizable energy. The results of the trial showed that the inclusion of L. leucocephala leaves meal in the diet at 21% level, has no significant adverse effect on feed intake, average daily weight gain, feed conversion ratio and nutrients utilization (except ether extract) of adult indigenous Senegal chickens. It has significantly (p<0.05) improved the crude protein and metabolizable energy utilization in birds fed the 7% level inclusion diet (LL7). [less ▲]

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