References of "Dickens, Molly"
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See detailRapid control of reproductive behaviour by locally synthesised oestrogens: focus on aromatase.
Cornil, Charlotte ULg; Seredynski, Aurore ULg; de Bournonville, Catherine ULg et al

in Journal of Neuroendocrinology (2013), 25(11), 1070-8

Oestrogens activate nucleus- and membrane-initiated signalling. Nucleus-initiated events control a wide array of physiological and behavioural responses. These effects generally take place within ... [more ▼]

Oestrogens activate nucleus- and membrane-initiated signalling. Nucleus-initiated events control a wide array of physiological and behavioural responses. These effects generally take place within relatively long periods of time (several hours to days). By contrast, membrane-initiated signalling affects a multitude of cellular functions in a much shorter timeframe (seconds to minutes). However, much less is known about their functional significance. Furthermore, the origin of the oestrogens able to trigger these acute effects is rarely examined. Finally, these two distinct types of oestrogenic actions have often been studied independently such that we do not exactly know how they cooperate to control the same response. The present review presents a synthesis of recent work carried out in our laboratory that aimed to address these issues in the context of the study of male sexual behaviour in Japanese quail, which is a considered as a suitable species for tackling these issues. The first section presents data indicating that 17b-oestradiol, or its membrane impermeable analogues, acutely enhances measures of male sexual motivation but does not affect copulatory behaviour. These effects depend on the activation of membrane-initiated events and local oestrogen production. The second part of this review discusses the regulation of brain oestrogen synthesis through post-translational modifications of the enzyme aromatase. Initially discovered in vitro, these rapid and reversible enzymatic modulations occur in vivo following variations in the social and environment context and therefore provide a mechanism of acute regulation of local oestrogen provision with a spatial and time resolution compatible with the rapid effects observed on male sexual behaviour. Finally, we discuss how these distinct modes of oestrogenic action (membrane- versus nucleus-initiated) acting in different time frames (short- versus long-term) interact to control different components (motivation versus performance) of the same behavioural response and improve reproductive fitness. [less ▲]

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See detailNeurochemical control of rapid stress-induced changes in brain aromatase activity
Dickens, Molly; Cornil, Charlotte ULg; Balthazart, Jacques ULg

in Journal of Neuroendocrinology (2013), 25(4), 329-39

In the male brain, the medial preoptic nucleus (POM) is known to be a critical relay for the activation of sexual behaviour, with the aromatisation of testosterone into 17b-oestradiol (E2) playing a key ... [more ▼]

In the male brain, the medial preoptic nucleus (POM) is known to be a critical relay for the activation of sexual behaviour, with the aromatisation of testosterone into 17b-oestradiol (E2) playing a key role. Acute stress has been shown to differentially modulate the aromatase enzyme in this and other brain nuclei in a sex-specific manner. In POM specifically, stress induces increases in aromatase activity (AA) that are both rapid and reversible. How the physiological processes initiated during an acute stress response mediate sex- and nuclei- specific changes in AA and which stress response hormones are involved remains to be determined. By examining the relative effects of corticosterone (CORT), arginine vasotocin (AVT, the avian homologue to arginine vasopressin) and corticotrophin-releasing factor (CRF), the present study aimed to define the hormone profile regulating stress-induced increases in AA in the POM. We found that CORT, AVT and CRF all appear to play some role in these changes in the male brain. In addition, these effects occur in a targeted manner, such that modulation of the enzyme by these hormones only occurs in the POM rather than in all aromatase-expressing nuclei. Similarly, in the female brain, the experimental effects were restricted to the POM but only CRF was capable of inducing the stress-like increases in AA. These data further demonstrate the high degree of specificity (nuclei-, sex- and hormone-specific effects) in this system, highlighting the complexity of the stress–aromatase link and suggesting modes through which the nongenomic modulation of this enzyme can result in targeted, rapid changes in local oestrogen concentrations. [less ▲]

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See detailRapid modulation of aromatase activity by social and environmental stimuli in quail
Cornil, Charlotte ULg; Dickens, Molly; BAll, Gregory et al

in Balthazart, Jacques; Ball, Gregory (Eds.) Brain aromatase, estrogens and behavior (2012)

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See detailSex differences in brain aromatase activity: genomic and non-genomic controls
Balthazart, Jacques ULg; Charlier, Thierry ULg; Cornil, Charlotte ULg et al

in Frontiers in Endocrinology (2011), 2

Aromatization of testosterone into estradiol in the preoptic area plays a critical role in the activation of male copulation in quail and in many other vertebrate species. Aromatase expression in quail ... [more ▼]

Aromatization of testosterone into estradiol in the preoptic area plays a critical role in the activation of male copulation in quail and in many other vertebrate species. Aromatase expression in quail and in other birds is higher than in rodents and other mammals, which has facilitated the study of the controls and functions of this enzyme. Over relatively long time periods (days to months), brain aromatase activity (AA), and transcription are markedly (four- to sixfold) increased by genomic actions of sex steroids. Initial work indicated that the preoptic AA is higher in males than in females and it was hypothesized that this differential production of estrogen could be a critical factor responsible for the lack of behavioral activation in females. Subsequent studies revealed, however, that this enzymatic sex difference might contribute but is not sufficient to explain the sex difference in behavior. Studies of AA, immunoreactivity, and mRNA concentrations revealed that sex differences observed when measuring enzymatic activity are not necessarily observed when one measures mRNA concentrations. Discrepancies potentially reflect post-translational controls of the enzymatic activity. AA in quail brain homogenates is rapidly inhibited by phosphorylation processes. Similar rapid inhibitions occur in hypothalamic explants maintained in vitro and exposed to agents affecting intracellular calcium concentrations or to glutamate agonists. Rapid changes in AA have also been observed in vivo following sexual interactions or exposure to short-term restraint stress and these rapid changes in estrogen production modulate expression of male sexual behaviors. These data suggest that brain estrogens display most if not all characteristics of neuromodulators if not neurotransmitters. Many questions remain however concerning the mechanisms controlling these rapid changes in estrogen production and their behavioral significance. [less ▲]

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See detailRapid regulation of aromatase activity and the role of stress
Dickens, Molly; Charlier, Thierry ULg; Cornil, Charlotte ULg et al

Poster (2010)

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