References of "Dewals, Benjamin G"
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See detailReplacement of Glycoprotein B in Alcelaphine Herpesvirus 1 by Its Ovine Herpesvirus 2 Homolog : Implications in Vaccine Development for Sheep-Associated Malignant Catarrhal Fever.
Cunha, Cristina W.; Taus, Naomi S.; Dewals, Benjamin G ULg et al

in mSphere (2016), 1(4), 00108-16

Vaccine development is a top priority in malignant catarrhal fever (MCF) research. In the case of sheep-associated MCF (SA-MCF) caused by ovine herpesvirus 2 (OvHV-2), progress toward this objective has ... [more ▼]

Vaccine development is a top priority in malignant catarrhal fever (MCF) research. In the case of sheep-associated MCF (SA-MCF) caused by ovine herpesvirus 2 (OvHV-2), progress toward this objective has been hindered by the absence of methods to attenuate or modify the virus, since it cannot be propagated in vitro. As an alternative for vaccine development, in this study, we tested the hypothesis that one of the SA-MCF vaccine candidate targets, OvHV-2 glycoprotein B (gB), could be expressed by a nonpathogenic alcelaphine herpesvirus 1 (AlHV-1) and then evaluated the potential of the AlHV-1/OvHV-2 chimera to be used as a vaccine and a diagnostic tool. The construction and characterization of an AlHV-1/OvHV-2 chimeric virus that is nonpathogenic and expresses an OvHV-2 vaccine target are significant steps toward the development of an SA-MCF vaccine and also provide a valuable means to study OvHV-2 biology. [less ▲]

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See detailSelf-inhibition of synthesis reduces antigen presentation of the alcelaphine herpesvirus 1-encoded latency-associated protein, aLANA
Sorel, Océane; Myster, Françoise; Vanderplasschen, Alain et al

Conference (2016, July 23)

Alcelalphine herpesvirus 1 (AlHV-1) persistently infects its natural host, the wildebeest, without inducing any clinical signs. However, cross-transmission to other ruminant species leads to the ... [more ▼]

Alcelalphine herpesvirus 1 (AlHV-1) persistently infects its natural host, the wildebeest, without inducing any clinical signs. However, cross-transmission to other ruminant species leads to the development of a deadly lymphoproliferative disease named malignant catarrhal fever (MCF). AlHV-1 ORF73 encodes the latency-associated nuclear antigen (LANA)-homolog protein termed aLANA. Similarly to other viral genome maintenance proteins encoded by gammaherpesviruses, aLANA has recently been shown to be essential for viral persistence and induction of MCF. Here we have investigated the self-inhibition of antigen presentation by aLANA and the potential role of such mechanism during the development of MCF. We showed that the GE-rich repeat domain of aLANA was sufficient to inhibit the presentation of an epitope linked to it. Though antigen presentation in absence of GE was dependent upon proteasomal degradation of aLANA, a lack of GE did not affect protein turnover. We further found that similarly to EBNA-1 GAr, aLANA GE downregulated protein self-synthesis. Likewise, such mechanism could be associated with reduced antigen presentation in vitro. In addition, in-frame insertion of GE repeat domain in a heterologous eGFP protein significantly down-regulated protein steady-state levels and self-antigen presentation. Next, we modified the AlHV-1 ORF73 gene sequence to reduce the purine bias in GE, without affecting the peptidic sequence. Such codon-modified aLANA GEm construct displayed increased antigen presentation. Finally, we generated an AlHV-1 recombinant strain expressing a GE-deficient aLANA protein and observed that viral growth was not affected in vitro by the absence of aLANA GE domain and MCF could be induced in rabbits irrespective of the expression of full-length aLANA or GE-deficient aLANA protein. [less ▲]

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See detailRELMs in the Realm of Helminths
Horsnell, William G. C.; Dewals, Benjamin G ULg

in Trends in parasitology (2016)

Resistin-like molecule (RELM) proteins are essential for immunity to helminths. Recently, Chen and collaborators identified a dominant role for RELMalpha over RELMbeta in host immunity to Nippostrongylus ... [more ▼]

Resistin-like molecule (RELM) proteins are essential for immunity to helminths. Recently, Chen and collaborators identified a dominant role for RELMalpha over RELMbeta in host immunity to Nippostrongylus brasiliensis using a double knockout system. The study highlighted how important and yet divergent the contributions of these proteins are in the control of helminth infections. [less ▲]

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See detailMicroRNAs in large herpesvirus DNA genomes: recent advances.
Sorel, Oceane; Dewals, Benjamin G ULg

in Biomolecular concepts (2016), 7(4), 229-39

MicroRNAs (miRNAs) are small non-coding RNAs (ncRNAs) that regulate gene expression. They alter mRNA translation through base-pair complementarity, leading to regulation of genes during both physiological ... [more ▼]

MicroRNAs (miRNAs) are small non-coding RNAs (ncRNAs) that regulate gene expression. They alter mRNA translation through base-pair complementarity, leading to regulation of genes during both physiological and pathological processes. Viruses have evolved mechanisms to take advantage of the host cells to multiply and/or persist over the lifetime of the host. Herpesviridae are a large family of double-stranded DNA viruses that are associated with a number of important diseases, including lymphoproliferative diseases. Herpesviruses establish lifelong latent infections through modulation of the interface between the virus and its host. A number of reports have identified miRNAs in a very large number of human and animal herpesviruses suggesting that these short non-coding transcripts could play essential roles in herpesvirus biology. This review will specifically focus on the recent advances on the functions of herpesvirus miRNAs in infection and pathogenesis. [less ▲]

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See detailSmall RNA deep sequencing identifies viral microRNAs during malignant catarrhal fever induced by alcelaphine herpesvirus 1
Sorel, Océane ULg; Tuddenham, Lee; Myster, Françoise ULg et al

in Journal of General Virology (The) (2015), 96(11), 3360-3372

Alcelaphine herpesvirus 1 (AlHV-1) is a c-herpesvirus (c-HV) carried asymptomatically by wildebeest. Upon cross-species transmission, AlHV-1 induces a fatal lymphoproliferative disease named malignant ... [more ▼]

Alcelaphine herpesvirus 1 (AlHV-1) is a c-herpesvirus (c-HV) carried asymptomatically by wildebeest. Upon cross-species transmission, AlHV-1 induces a fatal lymphoproliferative disease named malignant catarrhal fever (MCF) in many ruminants, including cattle, and the rabbit model. Latency has been shown to be essential for MCF induction. However, the mechanisms causing the activation and proliferation of infected CD8+T cells are unknown. Many c-HVs express microRNAs (miRNAs). These small non-coding RNAs can regulate expression of host or viral target genes involved in various pathways and are thought to facilitate viral infection and/or mediate activation and proliferation of infected lymphocytes. The AlHV-1 genome has been predicted to encode a large number of miRNAs. However, their precise contribution in viral infection and pathogenesis in vivo remains unknown. Here, using cloning and sequencing of small RNAs we identified 36 potential miRNAs expressed in a lymphoblastoid cell line propagated from a calf infected with AlHV-1 and developing MCF. Among the sequenced candidate miRNAs, 32 were expressed on the reverse strand of the genome in two main clusters. The expression of these 32 viral miRNAs was further validated using Northern blot and quantitative reverse transcription PCR in lymphoid organs of MCF- developing calves or rabbits. To determine the concerted contribution in MCF of 28 viral miRNAs clustered in the non-protein-coding region of the AlHV-1 genome, a recombinant virus was produced. The absence of these 28 miRNAs did not affect viral growth in vitro or MCF induction in rabbits, indicating that the AlHV-1 miRNAs clustered in this non-protein-coding genomic region are dispensable for MCF induction. [less ▲]

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See detailThe genome of a tortoise herpesvirus (testudinid herpesvirus 3) has a novel structure and contains a large region that is not required for replication in vitro or virulence in vivo.
Gandar, Frederic ULg; Wilkie, Gavin S.; Gatherer, Derek et al

in Journal of Virology (2015), 89(22), 11438-11456

Testudinid herpesvirus 3 (TeHV-3) is the causative agent of a lethal disease affecting several tortoise species. The threat that this virus poses to endangered animals is focusing efforts on ... [more ▼]

Testudinid herpesvirus 3 (TeHV-3) is the causative agent of a lethal disease affecting several tortoise species. The threat that this virus poses to endangered animals is focusing efforts on characterizing its properties, in order to enable the development of prophylactic methods. We have sequenced the genomes of the two most studied TeHV-3 strains (1976 and 4295). TeHV-3 strain 1976 has a novel genome structure and is most closely related to a turtle herpesvirus, thus supporting its classification into genus Scutavirus, subfamily Alphaherpesvirinae, family Herpesviridae. The sequence of strain 1976 also revealed viral counterparts of cellular interleukin-10 and semaphorin, which have not been described previously in members of subfamily Alphaherpesvirinae. TeHV-3 strain 4295 is a mixture of three forms (m1, m2, and M), in which, in comparison to strain 1976, the genomes exhibit large, partially overlapping deletions of 12.5 to 22.4 kb. Viral subclones representing these forms were isolated by limiting dilution assays, and each replicated in cell culture comparably to strain 1976. With the goal of testing the potential of the three forms as attenuated vaccine candidates, strain 4295 was inoculated intranasally into Hermann's tortoises (Testudo hermanni). All inoculated subjects died, and PCR analyses demonstrated the ability of the m2 and M forms to spread and invade the brain. In contrast, the m1 form was detected in none of the organs tested, suggesting its potential as the basis of an attenuated vaccine candidate. Our findings represent a major step toward characterizing TeHV-3 and developing prophylactic methods against it. [less ▲]

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See detailA gammaherpesvirus infection protects against allergic asthma.
Machiels, Bénédicte ULg; Dourcy, Mickael ULg; Sabatel, Catherine ULg et al

Poster (2014, December 12)

The “hygiene hypothesis” proposes that the augmentation of allergic diseases in developed countries could be linked to a reduced exposure to infections during childhood. Surprisingly, the potential ... [more ▼]

The “hygiene hypothesis” proposes that the augmentation of allergic diseases in developed countries could be linked to a reduced exposure to infections during childhood. Surprisingly, the potential protective role of herpesvirus infections against allergy development has never been addressed directly. In this study, we used the Murid herpesvirus 4 (MuHV-4) to study the impact of a persistent gammaherpesvirus infection on the development of House Dust Mites (HDM)-induced allergic asthma. Our results revealed that MuHV-4 infection affects both the sensitization and the challenging phases of HDM-induced airway allergy. In particular, we highlighted that MuHV-4 infection strongly impacts the lung innate immune response. Indeed, while the dendritic cells remained competent to uptake antigens and to migrate to the draining lymph nodes, MuHV-4 infection impaired their ability to trigger HDM sensitization. In the future, these results could allow us to develop strategies to prevent the development of TH2-skewed responses against respiratory allergens. [less ▲]

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See detailSchistosoma mansoni egg-induced inflammation inhibits γ-herpesvirus replication
Dougall, Annette ULg; Rolot, Marion ULg; Vanderplasschen, Alain ULg et al

Poster (2014, December)

Geographically, S. mansoni overlaps with human γ-herpesvirus infections such as Kaposi’s sarcoma-associated herpesvirus. The strongly regulated Th2-type immune response generated during infection by S ... [more ▼]

Geographically, S. mansoni overlaps with human γ-herpesvirus infections such as Kaposi’s sarcoma-associated herpesvirus. The strongly regulated Th2-type immune response generated during infection by S. mansoni may jeopardize or improve the host’s ability to generate effective immunity against co-infecting pathogens, such as viruses. Here, we have trialled two approaches using murine herpesvirus-4 (MuHV-4). The first used a S. mansoni egg model to induce lung granulomas followed by intranasal infection with the MuHV-4-luc+ recombinant virus. Alternatively, we naturally infected mice with S. mansoni cercariae to induce a systemic Th2-type response and granulomas in the liver and intestine before intranasal MuHV-4-luc+ infection. We observed in both models a significant reduction of MuHV-4 replication in the lungs at day 5 and 7 pi associated with reduced weight loss caused by MuHV-4 infection. These results indicate that helminth induce Th2-type responses could inhibit and protect against viral infection. [less ▲]

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See detailThe A2 gene of alcelaphine herpesvirus-1 is a transcriptional regulator affecting cytotoxicity in virus-infected T cells but is not required for malignant catarrhal fever induction in rabbits.
Parameswaran, Nevi; Dewals, Benjamin G ULg; Giles, Tom C. et al

in Virus research (2014)

Alcelaphine herpesvirus-1 (AlHV-1) causes malignant catarrhal fever (MCF). The A2 gene of AlHV-1 is a member of the bZIP transcription factor family. We wished to determine whether A2 is a virulence gene ... [more ▼]

Alcelaphine herpesvirus-1 (AlHV-1) causes malignant catarrhal fever (MCF). The A2 gene of AlHV-1 is a member of the bZIP transcription factor family. We wished to determine whether A2 is a virulence gene or not and whether it is involved in pathogenesis by interference with host transcription pathways. An A2 gene knockout (A2DeltaAlHV-1) virus, revertant (A2revAlHV-1) virus, and wild-type virus (wtAlHV-1) were used to infect three groups of rabbits. A2DeltaAlHV-1-infected rabbits succumbed to MCF, albeit with a delayed onset compared to the control groups, so A2 is not a critical virulence factor. Differential gene transcription analysis by RNAseq and qRT-PCR validation of a selection of these was performed in infected large granular lymphocyte (LGL) T cells obtained in culture from the MCF-affected animals. A2 was involved in the transcriptional regulation of immunological, cell cycle and apoptosis pathways. In particular, there was a bias towards gammadelta T cell receptor (TCR) expression and downregulation of alphabeta TCR. TCR signalling, apoptosis, cell cycle, IFN-gamma and NFAT pathways were affected. Of particular interest was partial inhibition of the cytotoxicity-associated pathways involving perforin and the granzymes A and B in the A2DeltaAlHV-1-infected LGLs compared to controls. In functional assays, A2DeltaAlHV-1-infected LGLs were significantly less cytotoxic than wtAlHV-1- and A2revAlHV-1-infected LGLs using rabbit corneal epithelial cells (SIRC) as targets. This implies that A2 is involved in a pathway enhancing the expression of LGL cytotoxicity. This is important as virus-infected T cell cytotoxicity in vivo has been suggested as a potential mechanism of disease induction in MCF. [less ▲]

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See detailWildebeest-virus symbiosis
Dewals, Benjamin G ULg; Vanderplasschen, Alain ULg

in International Innovation (2014), 134

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See detailLung-resident CD4 T cells are sufficient for IL-4Ralpha-dependent recall immunity to Nippostrongylus brasiliensis infection.
Thawer, S. G.; Horsnell, W. Gc; Darby, M. et al

in Mucosal Immunology (2014), 7(2), 239-248

Immunity to Nippostrongylus brasiliensis reinfection requires pulmonary CD4+ T-cell responses. We examined whether secondary lymphoid recruited or pre-existing lung CD4+ T-cell populations coordinated ... [more ▼]

Immunity to Nippostrongylus brasiliensis reinfection requires pulmonary CD4+ T-cell responses. We examined whether secondary lymphoid recruited or pre-existing lung CD4+ T-cell populations coordinated this immunity. To do this, we blocked T-cell egress from lymph nodes using Fingolimod (FTY720). This impaired host ability to resolve a primary infection but did not change effectiveness of recall immunity. Associated with this effective recall immunity was the expansion and T helper type 2 polarization of a pre-existing pulmonary CD4+ T-cell population. LTbetaR-Ig (lymphotoxin beta-receptor fusion protein)-mediated disruption of stromal cell organization of immune cells did not disrupt this recall immunity, suggesting that protection was mediated by a pulmonary interstitial residing CD4+ T-cell population. Adoptive transfer of N. brasiliensis-experienced pulmonary CD4+ T cells from FTY720-treated wild-type or T-cell interleukin (IL)-4Ralpha-deficient mice demonstrated protection to be IL-4Ralpha dependent. These results show that pre-existing CD4+ T cells can drive effective recall immunity to N. brasiliensis infection independently of T-cell recruitment from secondary lymphoid organs.Mucosal Immunology advance online publication 19 June 2013; doi:10.1038/mi.2013.40. [less ▲]

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See detailIL-4Ralpha-associated antigen processing by B cells promotes immunity in Nippostrongylus brasiliensis infection.
Horsnell, William G. C.; Darby, Matthew G.; Hoving, Jennifer C. et al

in PLoS pathogens (2013), 9(10), 1003662

In this study, B cell function in protective T(H)2 immunity against N. brasiliensis infection was investigated. Protection against secondary infection depended on IL-4Ralpha and IL-13; but not IL-4 ... [more ▼]

In this study, B cell function in protective T(H)2 immunity against N. brasiliensis infection was investigated. Protection against secondary infection depended on IL-4Ralpha and IL-13; but not IL-4. Protection did not associate with parasite specific antibody responses. Re-infection of B cell-specific IL-4Ralpha(-)/(-) mice resulted in increased worm burdens compared to control mice, despite their equivalent capacity to control primary infection. Impaired protection correlated with reduced lymphocyte IL-13 production and B cell MHC class II and CD86 surface expression. Adoptive transfer of in vivo N. brasiliensis primed IL-4Ralpha expressing B cells into naive BALB/c mice, but not IL-4Ralpha or IL-13 deficient B cells, conferred protection against primary N. brasiliensis infection. This protection required MHC class II compatibility on B cells suggesting cognate interactions by B cells with CD4(+) T cells were important to co-ordinate immunity. Furthermore, the rapid nature of these protective effects by B cells suggested non-BCR mediated mechanisms, such as via Toll Like Receptors, was involved, and this was supported by transfer experiments using antigen pulsed Myd88(-)/(-) B cells. These data suggest TLR dependent antigen processing by IL-4Ralpha-responsive B cells producing IL-13 contribute significantly to CD4(+) T cell-mediated protective immunity against N. brasiliensis infection. [less ▲]

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See detailAn essential role for gamma-herpesvirus latency-associated nuclear antigen homolog in an acute lymphoproliferative disease of cattle.
Palmeira, Leonor; Sorel, Océane ULg; Van Campe, Willem et al

in Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America (2013)

Wildebeests carry asymptomatically alcelaphine herpesvirus 1 (AlHV-1), a gamma-herpesvirus inducing malignant catarrhal fever (MCF) to several ruminant species (including cattle). This acute and lethal ... [more ▼]

Wildebeests carry asymptomatically alcelaphine herpesvirus 1 (AlHV-1), a gamma-herpesvirus inducing malignant catarrhal fever (MCF) to several ruminant species (including cattle). This acute and lethal lymphoproliferative disease occurs after a prolonged asymptomatic incubation period after transmission. Our recent findings with the rabbit model indicated that AlHV-1 infection is not productive during MCF. Here, we investigated whether latency establishment could explain this apparent absence of productive infection and sought to determine its role in MCF pathogenesis. First, whole-genome cellular and viral gene expression analyses were performed in lymph nodes of MCF-developing calves. Whereas a severe disruption in cellular genes was observed, only 10% of the entire AlHV-1 genome was expressed, contrasting with the 45% observed during productive infection in vitro. In vivo, the expressed viral genes included the latency-associated nuclear antigen homolog ORF73 but none of the regions known to be essential for productive infection. Next, genomic conformation analyses revealed that AlHV-1 was essentially episomal, further suggesting that MCF might be the consequence of a latent infection rather than abortive lytic infection. This hypothesis was further supported by the high frequencies of infected CD8+ T cells during MCF using immunodetection of ORF73 protein and single-cell RT-PCR approaches. Finally, the role of latency-associated ORF73 was addressed. A lack of ORF73 did not impair initial virus replication in vivo, but it rendered AlHV-1 unable to induce MCF and persist in vivo and conferred protection against a lethal challenge with a WT virus. Together, these findings suggest that a latent infection is essential for MCF induction. [less ▲]

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See detailCis-acting inhibition of MHC class I-restricted epitope presentation by Alcelaphine herpesvirus 1 genome maintenance protein
Sorel, Océane ULg; Myster, Françoise ULg; Vanderplasschen, Alain ULg et al

Poster (2013, January 18)

γ-Herpesviruses persist as latent episomes in actively dividing lymphocytes. Their consequent need to express a viral genome maintenance protein (GMP) during latency presents a potential immune target ... [more ▼]

γ-Herpesviruses persist as latent episomes in actively dividing lymphocytes. Their consequent need to express a viral genome maintenance protein (GMP) during latency presents a potential immune target. However, the GMPs from several γ-herpesviruses have evolved related strategies to limit their own MHC class I epitope presentation to cytotoxic T lymphocytes (CTLs). Alcelaphine herpesvirus 1 (AlHV-1) is a γ-herpesvirus that persists asymptomatically in its natural host, the wildebeest. However, AlHV-1 transmission to a large number of susceptible ruminants, including cattle, results in the development of a lethal lymphoproliferative disease named malignant catarrhal fever (MCF). We recently observed that the AlHV-1 GMP-homologue encoded by ORF73 is highly expressed during MCF and that the impairment of its expression renders AlHV-1 unable to induce MCF. With its 1300 aa, AlHV-1 ORF73 is the largest γ-herpesvirus GMP described to date and contains a large acidic internal repeat region that could be involved in the cis-acting CTL evasion mechanism. Here, we sought to determine the CTL evasion properties of AlHV-1 ORF73. We first performed bioinformatic analyses to characterize the protein domains. Then, we used an in vitro assay to demonstrate that ORF73 severely limits the presentation at the cell surface of an MHC class I-restricted epitope linked to ORF73 in cis. These results suggest that AlHV-1 has developed mechanisms to evade cytotoxic anti-viral response during latency. The exact mechanisms explaining the presentation defect remain to be deciphered as well as the role of the cis-acting CTL evasion mechanism of ORF73 in the pathogenesis of MCF. [less ▲]

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