References of "Dewé, Walthère"
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See detailComparison of rectal and infrared ear temperatures in older hospital inpatients.
Smitz, Simon ULg; Giagoultsis, T; Dewé, Walthère ULg et al

in Journal of the American Geriatrics Society (2000), 48(1), 63-6

OBJECTIVES: To assess the agreement between infrared emission detection (IRED) ear and rectal temperatures and to determine the validity of IRED ear thermometry in detecting rectal fever. DESIGN ... [more ▼]

OBJECTIVES: To assess the agreement between infrared emission detection (IRED) ear and rectal temperatures and to determine the validity of IRED ear thermometry in detecting rectal fever. DESIGN: Prospective, convenience sample, unblinded study. SETTING: An acute geriatric unit (teaching hospital) and a multidisciplinary intensive care unit. PARTICIPANTS: The study included 45 inpatients (26 women and 19 men), aged 78.3+/-6.9 years, admitted over a 4-month period. Twelve of the patients were definitely infected. MEASUREMENTS: Sequential rectal (RT) and ear temperature (ET) measurements were performed using mercury-in-glass and IRED ear thermometers, respectively. IRED ear temperatures were measured at both ears (unadjusted mode), with the highest of six ear temperatures considered the true value. RESULTS: Mean RT (37.39 degrees C +/- 0.52 degrees C) was significantly (P<.001) higher than mean ET (36.89 degrees C +/-0.59 degrees C). A highly significant positive correlation was found between RT and ET (slope = 0.69; 95% CI, 0.52-0.86; P<.001; r = 0.78). The mean bias (mean of the differences) between RT and ET was 0.50 degrees C +/-0.37 degrees C (95% CI, 0.41 degrees C-0.59 degrees C), and the 95% limits of agreement -0.22 degrees C and 1.23 degrees C (95% CI, -0.38 degrees C to 1.39 degrees C). According to the standard criterion (RT > or =37.6 degrees C), 14 patients were febrile. Using an optimum IRED ear fever threshold (37.2 degrees C), the sensitivity and specificity of IRED ear thermometry for predicting rectal fever were 86% and 89%, respectively (positive predictive value, 80%; negative predictive value, 93%). CONCLUSIONS: The degree of agreement between rectal temperature and the highest of six IRED ear temperatures was acceptable. Using an optimal IRED ear fever threshold of 37.2 degrees C (99 degrees F), IRED ear thermometry had acceptable sensitivity and specificity for predicting rectal fever. [less ▲]

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See detailEvaluation of frequency and type of errors detected by a computerized record and verify system during radiation treatment
Barthelemy, Nicole ULg; Sabatier, Jacques; Dewé, Walthère ULg et al

in Radiotherapy & Oncology (1999), 53(2), 149-54

Background: Computerized record and verify systems (RVS) have been introduced to improve the precision of radiation treatment delivery. These systems prevent the delivery of ionizing radiations when the ... [more ▼]

Background: Computerized record and verify systems (RVS) have been introduced to improve the precision of radiation treatment delivery. These systems prevent the delivery of ionizing radiations when the settings of the treatment machine do not match the intended parameters within some maximal authorized deviation. Purpose: To assess the potential alteration of the frequency of errors associated with the use of RVS during radiation treatment delivery. Materials and methods: The software of the RVS was altered in order to record the settings actually used for radiation treatment delivery whereas the verification function was suppressed. At the end of the study period, the settings used during daily administration of radiation treatment were compared to the parameters recorded in the RVS using the computer. They were also compared with the planned ones written in the patient treatment chart. Results: Out of the 147 476 parameters examined during the study period, 678 (0.46%) were set erroneously. At least one error occurred in 628 (3.22%) of the 19 512 treated fields. An erroneous parameter was introduced in the RVS memory in 22 (1.17%) of the 1885 fields. Conclusions: RVS has the potential to improve precision of radiation treatment delivery by detecting a significant number of setting errors. However, excessive confidence in RVS could lead to repeated errors as there is a potential for the entry of erroneous parameters into the RVS memory. [less ▲]

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See detailLimited clinical utility of a self-evaluating risk assessment scale for postmenopausal osteoporosis: lack of predictive value of lifestyle-related factors
Goemaere, S; Zegels, Brigitte ULg; Toye, K et al

in Calcified Tissue International (1999), 65(5), 354-358

The aim of this study was to assess the efficiency of a self-administered questionnaire to identify subjects with postmenopausal osteoporosis in the setting of first line medical care. A sample of 300 ... [more ▼]

The aim of this study was to assess the efficiency of a self-administered questionnaire to identify subjects with postmenopausal osteoporosis in the setting of first line medical care. A sample of 300 postmenopausal women completed the questionnaire based on 18 items. Bone mineral density at the lumbar spine (BMD-L), total hip (BMD-H), and femoral neck (BMD-N) was used as objective criterion for evaluation. The mean risk score was 8.2 +/- 3.21. BMD was correlated with total risk score: r = -0.32 for BMD-L, -0.36 for BMD-N, and -0.43 for BMD-H. Cutoff points for the risk score (equal likelihood points) according to a T-score threshold of -2.5 were 8.6 for BMD-L and BMD-N and 9.3 for BMD-H; specificity and sensitivity was 62% and 62%, respectively, for BMD-L, 65% and 62% for BMD-N, and 75% and 63% for BMD-H. Stepwise multiple regression analysis of the questionnaire items in relation to BMD showed higher correlation coefficients for models including individual items rather than the overall risk score. Items concerning low weight, older age, and wrist fracture after 50 years of age were always selected as significant determinants of BMD (R = 0.43-0.55). Hormonal replacement therapy was also an important determinant. Lifestyle-related items did not contribute significantly. In conclusion, the diagnostic performance of the 18-item self-administered questionnaire was poorer than a shortened questionnaire omitting lifestyle factors. The clinical utility of a questionnaire should ultimately be evaluated in the specific optic of a chosen global strategy for prevention of osteoporotic fractures. [less ▲]

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See detailExpression of bone sialoprotein in human prostate cancer is associated with progression
Waltregny, David ULg; Bellahcene, Akeila ULg; Van Riet, Ivan et al

in Acta Clinica Belgica (1998, January), 53(3), 221-240

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See detailReproducibility and diagnostic sensitivity of ultrasonometry of the phalanges to assess osteoporosis.
Reginster, Jean-Yves ULg; Dethor, M; Pirenne, H et al

in International Journal of Gynecology & Obstetrics (1998), 63(1), 21-8

OBJECTIVE: The present study was designed to assess the reproducibility and the diagnostic sensitivity of the amplitude-dependent speed of sound (SoS) at the distal metaphysis of the proximal phalanges ... [more ▼]

OBJECTIVE: The present study was designed to assess the reproducibility and the diagnostic sensitivity of the amplitude-dependent speed of sound (SoS) at the distal metaphysis of the proximal phalanges. METHOD: Fourteen presumably healthy volunteers were repeatedly measured every 6 weeks for approximately 6 months in order to assess the reproducibility of the SoS of the phalanges. We recruited 91 post-menopausal women, aged 55-75 years, who were divided in three groups according to their lumbar bone mineral density (BMD) and the existence of prevalent vertebral fractures. The objective was to evaluate the diagnostic sensitivity of SoS measurements. We used DBM Sonic 1200 equipment, and assessed the velocity at which US cross the phalanx in a lateral-medial direction. In post-menopausal women, BMD was measured by dual energy X-ray absorptiometry (DXA) at the level of the lumbar spine, the total zone of the non-dominant hip and the femoral neck zone of the non-dominant hip. RESULTS: The precision of the SoS measurements was 0.71+/-0.05% (mean+/-S.E.M) whereas the reproducibility was 0.95+/-0.06%. Subjects with low BMD or prevalent fractures had significantly lower values of SoS (P < 0.001) than the controls. ROC curve analysis applied to the study population confirmed that SoS was able to discriminate between the controls and osteoporotic subjects (area under the ROC curves were 0.82 (low bone mineral density) and 0.85 (prevalent fractures), respectively). Hip BMD was found to be the most significant variable when comparing the controls and the low density patients by stepwise discrimination and SoS significantly improved the discrimination between the groups when added to the hip BMD. The hip BMD was again the most discriminant variable when applying the same techniques to controls and patients with prevalent fractures, followed by SoS and lumbar BMD. A cut-off value of 1881 m/s is defined for SoS by logistic discrimination and likelihood ratio function. With this value, the sensitivity and the specificity for SoS used in the diagnosis of established osteoporosis were, 81.5% and 79.3%, respectively. Sensitivity and specificity were significantly improved when combining ultrasonometry and densitometry. CONCLUSION: Measurement of ultrasound velocity at the phalanges appears to be a precise and reproducible technique. SoS discriminates between normal post-menopausal women and patients with either low lumbar BMD or prevalent fractures to the same extent as BMD measurements. [less ▲]

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