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See detailCharacterization of amylolysin, a novel lantibiotic from Bacillus amyloliquefaciens GA1
Arias, A. A.; Ongena, Marc ULg; Devreese, B. et al

in PLoS ONE (2013), 8(12),

Background: Lantibiotics are heat-stable peptides characterized by the presence of thioether amino acid lanthionine and methyllanthionine. They are capable to inhibit the growth of Gram-positive bacteria ... [more ▼]

Background: Lantibiotics are heat-stable peptides characterized by the presence of thioether amino acid lanthionine and methyllanthionine. They are capable to inhibit the growth of Gram-positive bacteria, including Listeria monocytogenes, Staphylococcus aureus or Bacillus cereus, the causative agents of food-borne diseases or nosocomial infections. Lantibiotic biosynthetic machinery is encoded by gene cluster composed by a structural gene that codes for a pre-lantibiotic peptide and other genes involved in pre-lantibiotic modifications, regulation, export and immunity. Methodology/Findings: Bacillus amyloliquefaciens GA1 was found to produce an antimicrobial peptide, named amylolysin, active on an array of Gram-positive bacteria, including methicillin resistant S. aureus. Genome characterization led to the identification of a putative lantibiotic gene cluster that comprises a structural gene (amlA) and genes involved in modification (amlM), transport (amlT), regulation (amlKR) and immunity (amlFE). Disruption of amlA led to loss of biological activity, confirming thus that the identified gene cluster is related to amylolysin synthesis. MALDI-TOF and LC-MS analysis on purified amylolysin demonstrated that this latter corresponds to a novel lantibiotic not described to date. The ability of amylolysin to interact in vitro with the lipid II, the carrier of peptidoglycan monomers across the cytoplasmic membrane and the presence of a unique modification gene suggest that the identified peptide belongs to the group B lantibiotic. Amylolysin immunity seems to be driven by only two AmlF and AmlE proteins, which is uncommon within the Bacillus genus. Conclusion/Significance: Apart from mersacidin produced by Bacillus amyloliquefaciens strains Y2 and HIL Y-85,544728, reports on the synthesis of type B-lantibiotic in this species are scarce. This study reports on a genetic and structural characterization of another representative of the type B lantibiotic in B. amyloliquefaciens. Copyright: © 2013 Arguelles Arias et al. [less ▲]

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See detailIn Chlamydomonas, the Loss of Nd5 Subunit Prevents the Assembly of Whole Mitochondrial Complex I and Leads to the Formation of a Low Abundant 700 Kda Subcomplex
Cardol, Pierre ULg; Boutaffala, Layla ULg; Memmi, S. et al

in Biochimica et Biophysica Acta-Bioenergetics (2008), 1777

In the green alga Chlamydomonas reinhardtii, a mutant deprived of complex I enzyme activity presents a 1T deletion in the mitochondrial nd5 gene. The loss of the ND5 subunit prevents the assembly of the ... [more ▼]

In the green alga Chlamydomonas reinhardtii, a mutant deprived of complex I enzyme activity presents a 1T deletion in the mitochondrial nd5 gene. The loss of the ND5 subunit prevents the assembly of the 950 kDa whole complex I. Instead, a low abundant 700 kDa subcomplex, loosely associated to the inner mitochondrial membrane, is assembled. The resolution of the subcomplex by SDS-PAGE gave rise to 19 individual spots, sixteen having been identified by mass spectrometry analysis. Eleven, mainly associated to the hydrophilic part of the complex, are homologs to subunits of the bovine enzyme whereas five (including gamma-type carbonic anhydrase subunits) are specific to green plants or to plants and fungi. None of the subunits typical of the beta membrane domain of complex I enzyme has been identified in the mutant. This allows us to propose that the truncated enzyme misses the membrane distal domain of complex I but retains the proximal domain associated to the matrix arm of the enzyme. A complex I topology model is presented in the light of our results. Finally, a supercomplex most probably corresponding to complex I-complex III association, was identified in mutant mitochondria, indicating that the missing part of the enzyme is not required for the formation of the supercomplex. [less ▲]

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See detailCharacterization of the bifunctional glycosyltransferase/acyltransferase penicillin-binding protein 4 of Listeria monocytogenes
Zawadzka-Skomial, J.; Markiewicz, Z.; Nguyen-Disteche, M. et al

in Journal of Bacteriology (2006), 188(5), 1875-1881

Multimodular penicillin-binding proteins (PBPs) are essential enzymes responsible for bacterial cell wall peptidoglycan (PG) assembly. Their glycosyltransferase activity catalyzes glycan chain elongation ... [more ▼]

Multimodular penicillin-binding proteins (PBPs) are essential enzymes responsible for bacterial cell wall peptidoglycan (PG) assembly. Their glycosyltransferase activity catalyzes glycan chain elongation from lipid II substrate (undecaprenyl-pyrophosphoryi-N-acetylglucosamine-N-acetylmuramic acid-pentapeptide), and their transpeptidase activity catalyzes cross-linking between peptides carried by two adjacent glycan chains. Listeria monocytogenes is a food-borne pathogen which exerts its virulence through secreted and cell wall PG-associated virulence factors. This bacterium has five PBPs, including two bifunctional glycosyltransferase/transpeptidase class A PBPs, namely, PBP1 and PBP4. We have expressed and purified the latter and have shown that it binds penicillin and catalyzes in vitro glycan chain polymerization with an efficiency of 1,400 M-1 s(-1) from Escherichia coli lipid II substrate. PBP4 also catalyzes the aminolysis (D-Ala as acceptor) and hydrolysis of the thiolester donor substrate benzoyl-Gly-thioglycolate, indicating that PBP4 possesses both transpeptidase and carboxyeptidase activities. Disruption of the gene lmo2229 encoding PBP4 in L. monocytogenes EGD did not. p have any significant effect on growth rate, peptidoglycan composition, cell morphology, or sensitivity to beta-lactam antibiotics but did increase the resistance of the mutant to moenomycin. [less ▲]

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See detailMonitoring the zinc affinity of the metallo-beta-lactamase CphA by automated nanoESI-MS
De Vriendt, K.; Van Driessche, G.; Devreese, B. et al

in Journal of the American Society for Mass Spectrometry (2006), 17(2), 180-188

Metallo-beta-lactamases are zinc containing enzymes that are able to hydrolyze and inactivate beta-lactam antibiotics. The subclass B2 enzyme CphA of Aeromonas hydrophila is a unique metallo-p-lactamase ... [more ▼]

Metallo-beta-lactamases are zinc containing enzymes that are able to hydrolyze and inactivate beta-lactam antibiotics. The subclass B2 enzyme CphA of Aeromonas hydrophila is a unique metallo-p-lactamase because it degrades only carbapenems efficiently and is only active when it has one zinc ion bound. A zinc titration experiment was used to study the zinc affinity of the wild-type and of several mutant CphA enzymes. It shows that a second Zn2+ is also bound at high ion concentrations. All samples were analyzed using mass spectrometry in combination with an automated nanoESI source. The metal-free enzyme has a bimodal charge distribution indicative of two conformational states. A completely folded enzyme is detected when the apo-enzyme has bound the first zinc. Intensity ratios of the different enzyme forms were used to deduce the zinc affinities. CphA enzymes mutated in metal ligands show decreased zinc affinity compared to wild-type, especially D120 mutants. [less ▲]

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See detailDramatic broadening of the substrate profile of the Aeromonas hydrophila CphA metallo-beta-lactamase by site-directed mutagenesis
Bebrone, Carine ULg; Anne, C.; De Vriendt, K. et al

in Journal of Biological Chemistry (2005), 280(31), 28195-28202

Among class B beta-lactamases, the subclass B2 CphA enzyme is characterized by a unique specificity profile. CphA efficiently hydrolyzes only carbapenems. In this work, we generated site-directed mutants ... [more ▼]

Among class B beta-lactamases, the subclass B2 CphA enzyme is characterized by a unique specificity profile. CphA efficiently hydrolyzes only carbapenems. In this work, we generated site-directed mutants that possess a strongly broadened activity spectrum when compared with the WT CphA. Strikingly, the N116H/N220G double mutant exhibits a substrate profile close to that observed for the broad spectrum subclass B1 enzymes. The double mutant is significantly activated by the binding of a second zinc ion under conditions where the WT enzyme is non-competitively inhibited by the same ion. [less ▲]

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See detailHigher plant-like subunit composition of mitochondrial complex I from Chlamydomonas reinhardtii: 31 conserved components among eukaryotes
Cardol, Pierre ULg; Vanrobaeys, F.; Devreese, B. et al

in Biochimica et Biophysica Acta-Bioenergetics (2004), 1658(3), 212-224

The rotenone-sensitive NADH:ubiquinone oxidoreductase (complex I) is the most intricate membrane-bound enzyme of the mitochondrial respiratory chain. Notably the bovine enzyme comprises up to 46 subunits ... [more ▼]

The rotenone-sensitive NADH:ubiquinone oxidoreductase (complex I) is the most intricate membrane-bound enzyme of the mitochondrial respiratory chain. Notably the bovine enzyme comprises up to 46 subunits, while 27 subunits could be considered as widely conserved among eukaryotic complex I. By combining proteomic and genomic approaches, we characterized the complex I composition from the unicellular green alga Chlamydomonas reinhardtii. After purification by blue-native polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (BN-PAGE), constitutive subunits were analyzed by SDS-PAGE coupled to tandem mass spectrometry (MS) that allowed the identification of 30 proteins. We compared the known complex I components from higher plants, mammals, nematodes and fungi with this MS data set and the translated sequences from the algal genome project. This revealed that the Chlamydomonas complex I is likely composed of 42 proteins, for a total molecular mass of about 970 kDa. In addition to the 27 typical components, we have identified four new complex I subunit families (bovine ESSS, PFFD, B16.6, B12 homologues), extending the number of widely conserved eukaryote complex I components to 31. In parallel, our analysis showed that a variable number of subunits appears to be specific to each eukaryotic kingdom (animals, fungi or plants). Protein sequence divergence in these kingdom-specific sets is significant and currently we cannot exclude the possibility that homology between them exists, but has not yet been detected. (C) 2004 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved. [less ▲]

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See detailProteomic and genomic analysis of Chlamydomonas reinhardtii complex 1: conserved components in eukaryotes
Cardol, Pierre ULg; Vanrobaeys, F.; Devreese, B. et al

in Biochimica et Biophysica Acta-Bioenergetics (2004), 1657(Suppl. 1), 41-42

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See detailRole of Cys221 and Asn116 in the zinc-binding sites of the Aeromonas hydrophila metallo-beta-lactamase.
Vanhove, Marc; Zakhem, M.; Devreese, B. et al

in Cellular and molecular life sciences : CMLS (2003), 60(11), 2501-9

The CphA metallo-beta-lactamase produced by Aeromonas hydrophila exhibits two zinc-binding sites. Maximum activity is obtained upon binding of one zinc ion, whereas binding of the second zinc ion results ... [more ▼]

The CphA metallo-beta-lactamase produced by Aeromonas hydrophila exhibits two zinc-binding sites. Maximum activity is obtained upon binding of one zinc ion, whereas binding of the second zinc ion results in a drastic decrease in the hydrolytic activity. In this study, we analyzed the role of Asn116 and Cys221, two residues of the active site. These residues were replaced by site-directed mutagenesis and the different mutants were characterized. The C221S and C221A mutants were seriously impaired in their ability to bind the first, catalytic zinc ion and were nearly completely inactive, indicating a major role for Cys221 in the binding of the catalytic metal ion. By contrast, the binding of the second zinc ion was only slightly affected, at least for the C221S mutant. Mutation of Asn116 did not lead to a drastic decrease in the hydrolytic activity, indicating that this residue does not play a key role in the catalytic mechanism. However, the substitution of Asn116 by a Cys or His residue resulted in an approximately fivefold increase in the affinity for the second, inhibitory zinc ion. Together, these data suggested that the first zinc ion is located in the binding site involving the Cys221 and that the second zinc ion binds in the binding site involving Asn116 and, presumably, His118 and His196. [less ▲]

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See detailInfluence of moderate temperatures on myristoyl-CoA metabolism and acyl-CoA thioesterase activity in the psychrophilic antarctic yeast Rhodotorula aurantiaca.
Sabri, Ahmed ULg; Bare, G.; Jacques, P. et al

in Journal of Biological Chemistry (2001), 276(16), 12691-6

The inability of psychrophilic microorganisms to grow at moderate temperatures (>20 degrees C) presently represents an unresolved thermodynamic paradox. Here we report for the psychrophilic yeast ... [more ▼]

The inability of psychrophilic microorganisms to grow at moderate temperatures (>20 degrees C) presently represents an unresolved thermodynamic paradox. Here we report for the psychrophilic yeast Rhodotorula aurantiaca A19, isolated from Antarctic ice, that the inability to grow at temperatures close to 20 degrees C is associated with profound alterations in cell morphology and integrity. High performance liquid chromatography analysis of the intracellular acyl-CoA esters revealed an abnormal accumulation of myristoyl-CoA (C14-CoA) in cells cultivated close to the nonpermissive temperature. Its concentration (500 microm) was found to be 28-fold higher than in cells cultivated at 0 degrees C. If one considers its ability to disrupt membrane bilayers and to inhibit many cellular enzymes and functions, intracellular myristoyl-CoA accumulation in the psychrophile R. aurantiaca represents one of the principal causes of growth arrest at moderate temperatures. Intracellular acyl-CoA concentrations are believed to be regulated by thioesterase activity. Thus in an attempt to explore the mechanism by which temperature disrupts myristoyl-CoA metabolism, we isolated and characterized a long chain acyl-CoA thioesterase. The monomeric 80-kDa thioesterase from the psychrophilic yeast shows a very strong specificity for myristoyl-CoA. The affinity for substrate and the catalytic efficiency of the thioesterase are optimal below 5 degrees C (temperatures habitually experienced by the strain) and dramatically decrease with increasing temperature. The loss of affinity for substrate is related to the intracellular increase of myristoyl-CoA concentration. Our observations reveal one of the probable mechanisms by which temperature fixes the limit of growth for this psychrophilic yeast. [less ▲]

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See detailAn Additional Aromatic Interaction Improves the Thermostability and Thermophilicity of a Mesophilic Family 11 Xylanase: Structural Basis and Molecular Study
Georis, J.; De Lemos Esteves, Frédéric ULg; Lamotte-Brasseur, J. et al

in Protein Science : A Publication of the Protein Society (2000), 9(3), 466-75

In a general approach to the understanding of protein adaptation to high temperature, molecular models of the closely related mesophilic Streptomyces sp. S38 Xyl1 and thermophilic Thermomonospora fusca ... [more ▼]

In a general approach to the understanding of protein adaptation to high temperature, molecular models of the closely related mesophilic Streptomyces sp. S38 Xyl1 and thermophilic Thermomonospora fusca TfxA family 11 xylanases were built and compared with the three-dimensional (3D) structures of homologous enzymes. Some of the structural features identified as potential contributors to the higher thermostability of TfxA were introduced in Xyl1 by site-directed mutagenesis in an attempt to improve its thermostability and thermophilicity. A new Y11-Y16 aromatic interaction, similar to that present in TfxA and created in Xyl1 by the T11Y mutation, improved both the thermophilicity and thermostability. Indeed, the optimum activity temperature (70 vs. 60 degrees C) and the apparent Tm were increased by about 9 degrees C, and the mutant was sixfold more stable at 57 degrees C. The combined mutations A82R/F168H/N169D/delta170 potentially creating a R82-D169 salt bridge homologous to that present in TfxA improved the thermostability but not the thermophilicity. Mutations R82/D170 and S33P seemed to be slightly destabilizing and devoid of influence on the optimal activity temperature of Xyl1. Structural analysis revealed that residues Y11 and Y16 were located on beta-strands B1 and B2, respectively. This interaction should increase the stability of the N-terminal part of Xyl1. Moreover, Y11 and Y16 seem to form an aromatic continuum with five other residues forming putative subsites involved in the binding of xylan (+3, +2, +1, -1, -2). Y11 and Y16 might represent two additional binding subsites (-3, -4) and the T11Y mutation could thus improve substrate binding to the enzyme at higher temperature and thus the thermophilicity of Xyl1. [less ▲]

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See detailThe DmpA aminopeptidase from Ochrobactrum anthropi LMG7991 is the prototype of a new terminal nucleophile hydrolase family.
Fanuel, L; Goffin, Colette ULg; Cheggour, A et al

in Biochemical Journal (1999), 341(Pt 1), 147-55

The DmpA (d-aminopeptidase A) protein produced by Ochrobactrum anthropi hydrolyses p-nitroanilide derivatives of glycine and d-alanine more efficiently than that of l-alanine. When regular peptides are ... [more ▼]

The DmpA (d-aminopeptidase A) protein produced by Ochrobactrum anthropi hydrolyses p-nitroanilide derivatives of glycine and d-alanine more efficiently than that of l-alanine. When regular peptides are utilized as substrates, the enzyme behaves as an aminopeptidase with a preference for N-terminal residues in an l configuration, thus exemplifying an interesting case of stereospecificity reversal. The best-hydrolysed substrate is l-Ala-Gly-Gly, but tetra- and penta-peptides are also efficiently hydrolysed. The gene encodes a 375-residue precursor, but the active enzyme contains two polypeptides corresponding to residues 2-249 (alpha-subunit) and 250-375 (beta-subunit) of the precursor. Residues 249 and 250 are a Gly and a Ser respectively, and various substitutions performed by site-directed mutagenesis result in the production of an uncleaved and inactive protein. The N-terminal Ser residue of the beta-subunit is followed by a hydrophobic peptide, which is predicted to form a beta-strand structure. All these properties strongly suggest that DmpA is an N-terminal amidohydrolase. An exploration of the databases highlights the presence of a number of open reading frames encoding related proteins in various bacterial genomes. Thus DmpA is very probably the prototype of an original family of N-terminal hydrolases. [less ▲]

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